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Working at Height (Hindi) HD | Class Room Safety Training | Team OHSE
 
10:20
Work at height is work in any place, including a place at, above or below ground level, where a person could be injured if they fell from that place. Access and egress to a place of work can also be work at height. Examples of work activities that are classified as working at height: Working on trestles Working on a flat roof Erecting falsework or formwork Working on a ladder Working at ground level adjacent to an excavation; Working on formwork within an excavation Working near or adjacent to fragile materials What should we do? Carry out risk assessments for work at height activities and make sure that all work is Planned, Organised and carried out by a competent person Follow the General Principles of Prevention for managing risks from work at height – take steps to avoid, prevent or reduce risks Chose the right work equipment and select collective measures to prevent falls (such as guard rails and working platforms) before other measures which may only reduce the distance and consequences of a fall (such as nets or airbags) or may only provide fall-arrest through personal protection equipment. Control measures First, assess the risks. Factors to weigh up include the height of the task, the duration and frequency, and the condition of the surface being worked on. Before working at height work through these simple steps: avoid work at height where it's reasonably practicable to do so where work at height cannot be easily avoided, prevent falls using either an existing place of work that is already safe or the right type of equipment minimise the distance and consequences of a fall, by using the right type of equipment where the risk cannot be eliminated For each step, always consider measures that protect everyone at risk (collective protection) before measures that only protect the individual (personal protection). Collective protection is equipment that does not require the person working at height to act for it to be effective. Examples are permanent or temporary guardrails, scissor lifts, and tower scaffolds. Personal protection is equipment that requires the individual to act for it to be effective. An example is putting on a safety harness correctly and connecting it, with an energy-absorbing lanyard, to a suitable anchor point. Trainer's Name - Mohd. Syeed Siddiqui https://www.linkedin.com/in/mohdsyeeds/ For any business related queries, please contact - [email protected] Like Us on Facebook www.fb.com/teamohse Follow us on Instagram @teamohse
Views: 12543 Team OHSE
Excavation Safety (Hindi) HD | Class Room Safety Training | Team OHSE
 
16:53
"Excavation" includes any earthwork, trench, well, shaft, tunnel or underground working. Working in excavations is an extremely dangerous operation which can be made safe by an awareness of the hazards and the precautions to be taken and careful management of the process. The hazards and risks are usually: The collapse of the sides of the excavation. Materials falling onto the people working in the excavation. People and vehicles falling into the excavation. The undermining of nearby structures causing their collapse into the excavation. Damage to underground services during excavation work causing electrocution, explosion, gas escape, flooding etc. Ingress of water causing flooding The works should be carefully planned and carried out. Ensure that equipment and materials needed are available on site before work starts. Ensure that the work is directed by a competent supervisor and the works are inspected daily by someone who understands the risks and precautions to be taken. At least once a week the excavation should be thoroughly inspected and also after any event which may affect the temporary support. Such inspections should be documented. The precautions to be taken are: Trench collapse should be avoided by battering the sides to a safe angle or by supporting them with sheeting or proprietary support systems. Support should be installed without delay as the work progresses. Ensure the workers are competent and experienced as far as possible and that they have clear instructions. Excavated spoil, plant or materials should not be stored close to the sides of excavations as a loose material can fall in. The extra loading can make the sides of the excavation more likely to collapse. Prevent people from falling into excavations by substantial barriers around the edges. This must be done if the depth exceeds 2 meters but is recommended for excavations of lesser depths. Prevent vehicles from falling into excavations or surcharging and causing the collapse of the sides of the excavation by keeping them out of the area. Baulks and barriers can be provided for this purpose and should be painted to be easily visible. If vehicles have to tip materials into excavations then they should be prevented from over-running into the excavation by using stop blocks. Provide safe access in and out of the excavation. Hazardous fumes should be considered. Diesel and petrol engined equipment should not be allowed into excavations without arranging for exhausts to be ducted away or forced ventilation to be used. Cable and/or pipe plans and service plans should be used to locate underground services which should be marked on the ground and where practicable digging should take place as far as possible from them. Use cable and pipe locators during the course of the excavation work. Great care should be taken to ensure that mechanical means of digging are not used within 0.5 meters of underground services and spades and shovels should be used instead of picks and forks which are more likely to pierce cables. Once services are located and exposed they should be supported. Both new and existing services should be permanently marked by the use of appropriate tapes over the service and by placing permanent markers above ground indicating the service type, depth, route etc. Precautions should be taken against flooding by installing efficient means of pumping out the excavations ensuring that the outflow from the pump does not cause flooding problems elsewhere. Trainer's Name - Mohd. Syeed Siddiqui https://www.linkedin.com/in/mohdsyeeds/ For any business related queries, please contact - [email protected] Like Us on Facebook www.fb.com/teamohse Follow us on Instagram @teamohse
Views: 8325 Team OHSE
Introduction to Safety Management - Part 1 (Hindi) HD | Class Room Safety Training | Team OHSE
 
16:48
Introduction to Safety Management Safety: the condition of being safe from undergoing or causing hurt, injury, or loss Health: a state of complete physical, mental, and social well-being and not merely the absence of disease or infirmity. Environment: the surroundings or conditions in which a person, animal, or plant lives or operates. Hazard: Any source or situation that has the potential to bring harm. Harm in terms of loss or damage property, person or environment. Risk: In probability of the realization of the potential for loss or damage or injury. Accident: It is an unexpected or unplanned event which may or may not result in injury or damage or property loss or death. Incident: It is an unexpected or unplanned event which may or may not result in injury or damage or property loss or death. Dangerous occurrence: is an unplanned and undesired occurrence (incident) which has the potential to cause injury and which may or may not cause damage to property, equipment or the environment. Trainer's Name - Mohd. Syeed Siddiqui https://www.linkedin.com/in/mohdsyeeds/ For any business related queries, please contact - [email protected] Like Us on Facebook www.fb.com/teamohse Follow us on Instagram @teamohse
Views: 13634 Team OHSE
Hazard Identification and Risk Assessment (HIRA) Part-1/3 (Hindi) HD | Safety Training | Team OHSE
 
27:40
Hazard: Anything (e.g. condition, situation, practice, behavior) that has the potential to cause harm, including injury, disease, death, environmental, property and equipment damage. A hazard can be a thing or a situation. Hazard Identification: This is the process of examining each work area and work task for the purpose of identifying all the hazards which are “inherent in the job”. Work areas include but are not limited to machine workshops, laboratories, office areas, agricultural and horticultural environments, stores and transport, maintenance and grounds, reprographics, and lecture theatres and teaching spaces. Tasks can include (but may not be limited to) using screen-based equipment, audio and visual equipment, industrial equipment, hazardous substances and/or teaching/dealing with people, driving a vehicle, dealing with emergency situations, construction. This process is about finding what could cause harm in work task or area. Risk: The likelihood, or possibility, that harm (injury, illness, death, damage etc) may occur from exposure to a hazard. Risk Assessment: Is defined as the process of assessing the risks associated with each of the hazards identified so the nature of the risk can be understood. This includes the nature of the harm that may result from the hazard, the severity of that harm and the likelihood of this occurring. Please Be SAFE & ALERT. Trainer's Name - Mohd. Syeed Siddiqui https://www.linkedin.com/in/mohdsyeeds/ For any business related queries, please contact - [email protected] Like Us on Facebook www.fb.com/teamohse Follow us on Instagram @teamohse
Views: 33185 Team OHSE
Introduction to Safety Management - Part 2 (Hindi) HD | Class Room Safety Training | Team OHSE
 
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Introduction to Safety Management Importance of Safety management Fundamentals of Safety management Principles of Safety management Objectives of Safety management Safety: the condition of being safe from undergoing or causing hurt, injury, or loss Health: a state of complete physical, mental, and social well-being and not merely the absence of disease or infirmity. Environment: the surroundings or conditions in which a person, animal, or plant lives or operates. Hazard: Any source or situation that has the potential to bring harm. Harm in terms of loss or damage property, person or environment. Risk: In probability of the realization of the potential for loss or damage or injury. Accident: It is an unexpected or unplanned event which may or may not result in injury or damage or property loss or death. Incident: It is an unexpected or unplanned event which may or may not result in injury or damage or property loss or death. Dangerous occurrence: is an unplanned and undesired occurrence (incident) which has the potential to cause injury and which may or may not cause damage to property, equipment or the environment. Trainer's Name - Mohd. Syeed Siddiqui https://www.linkedin.com/in/mohdsyeeds/ For any business related queries, please contact - [email protected] Like Us on Facebook www.fb.com/teamohse Follow us on Instagram @teamohse
Views: 4593 Team OHSE
Introduction To Fire Safety in HSE (Hindi) HD | Class Room Safety Training | Team OHSE
 
11:21
Fire safety refers to precautions that are taken to prevent or reduce the likelihood of a fire that may result in death, injury or property damage, alert those in a structure to the presence of an uncontrolled fire in the event one occurs, better enable those threatened by fire to survive in and evacuate from affected areas, or to reduce the damage caused by a fire. Fire safety measures include those that are planned during the construction of a building or implemented in structures that are already standing and those that are taught to occupants of the building. Threats to fire safety are referred to as fire hazards. A fire hazard may include a situation that increases the likelihood a fire may start or may impede escape in the event a fire occurs. Trainer's Name - Mohd. Syeed Siddiqui https://www.linkedin.com/in/mohdsyeeds/ For any business related queries, please contact - [email protected] Like Us on Facebook www.fb.com/teamohse Follow us on Instagram @teamohse
Views: 13273 Team OHSE
Workplace Housekeeping & Safety (Hindi) HD | Class Room Safety Training | Team OHSE
 
20:01
Effective housekeeping can eliminate some workplace hazards and help get a job done safely and properly. Poor housekeeping can frequently contribute to accidents by hiding hazards that cause injuries. If the sight of paper, debris, clutter, and spills is accepted as normal, then other more serious health and safety hazards may be taken for granted. Housekeeping is not just cleanliness. It includes keeping work areas neat and orderly; maintaining halls and floors free of slip and trip hazards; and removing of waste materials (e.g., paper, cardboard) and other fire hazards from work areas. It also requires paying attention to important details such as the layout of the whole workplace, aisle marking, the adequacy of storage facilities, and maintenance. Good housekeeping is also a basic part of accident and fire prevention. Effective housekeeping is an ongoing operation: it is not a hit-and-miss cleanup done occasionally. Periodic "panic" cleanups are costly and ineffective in reducing accidents. Poor housekeeping can be a cause of accidents, such as: tripping over loose objects on floors, stairs, and platforms being hit by falling objects slipping on greasy, wet or dirty surfaces striking against projecting, poorly stacked items or misplaced material cutting, puncturing or tearing the skin of hands or other parts of the body on projecting nails, wire or steel strapping To avoid these hazards, a workplace must "maintain" order throughout a workday. Although this effort requires a great deal of management and planning, the benefits are many. The 5S method : 5S Seiri; Sorting out. 5S Seiton; Systematic arrangement. 5S Seiso; Sweeping. 5S Seiketsu; Sanitizing. 5S Shitsuke; Self-discipline. Trainer's Name - Mohd. Syeed Siddiqui https://www.linkedin.com/in/mohdsyeeds/ For any business related queries, please contact - [email protected] Like Us on Facebook www.fb.com/teamohse Follow us on Instagram @teamohse
Views: 15731 Team OHSE
Ladder Safety (Hindi) HD | Class Room Safety Training | Team OHSE
 
13:31
Ladders are tools. Many of the basic safety rules that apply to most tools also apply to the safe use of a ladder: If you feel tired or dizzy or are prone to losing your balance, stay off the ladder. Do not use ladders in high winds or storms. Wear clean slip-resistant shoes. Shoes with leather soles are not appropriate for ladder use since they are not considered sufficiently slip resistant. Before using a ladder, inspect it to confirm it is in good working condition. Ladders with loose or missing parts must be rejected. Rickety ladders that sway or lean to the side must be rejected. The ladder you select must be the right size for the job. The Duty Rating of the ladder must be greater than the total weight of the climber, tools, supplies, and other objects placed upon the ladder. The length of the ladder must be sufficient so that the climber does not have to stand on the top rung or step. When the ladder is set-up for use, it must be placed on the firm level ground and without any type of slippery condition present at either the base or top support points. Only one person at a time is permitted on a ladder unless the ladder is specifically designed for more than one climber (such as a Trestle Ladder). Ladders must not be placed in front of closed doors that can open towards the ladder. The door must be blocked open, locked, or guarded. Read the safety information labels on the ladder. The on-product safety information is specific to the particular type of ladder on which it appears. The climber is not considered qualified or adequately trained to use the ladder until familiar with this information. Factors contributing to falls from ladders include haste, sudden movement, lack of attention, the condition of the ladder (worn or damaged), the user's age or physical condition, or both, and the user's footwear. Although the user's weight or size typically does not increase the likelihood of a fall, improper climbing posture creates user clumsiness and may cause falls. Reduce your chances of falling during the climb by: wearing slip-resistant shoes with heavy soles to prevent foot fatigue; cleaning the soles of shoes to maximize traction; using towlines, a tool belt or an assistant to convey materials so that the climbers hands are free when climbing; climbing slowly and deliberately while avoiding sudden movements; never attempting to move a ladder while standing on it; keeping the center of your belt buckle (stomach) between the ladder side rails when climbing and while working. Do not overreach or lean while working so that you don't fall off the ladder sideways or pull the ladder over sideways while standing on it. Trainer's Name - Mohd. Syeed Siddiqui https://www.linkedin.com/in/mohdsyeeds/ For any business related queries, please contact - [email protected] Like Us on Facebook www.fb.com/teamohse Follow us on Instagram @teamohse
Views: 9369 Team OHSE
Hazard Identification and Risk Assessment (HIRA) Part-2/3 (Hindi) HD | Safety Training | Team OHSE
 
29:42
Hazard: Anything (e.g. condition, situation, practice, behavior) that has the potential to cause harm, including injury, disease, death, environmental, property and equipment damage. A hazard can be a thing or a situation. Hazard Identification: This is the process of examining each work area and work task for the purpose of identifying all the hazards which are “inherent in the job”. Work areas include but are not limited to machine workshops, laboratories, office areas, agricultural and horticultural environments, stores and transport, maintenance and grounds, reprographics, and lecture theatres and teaching spaces. Tasks can include (but may not be limited to) using screen-based equipment, audio and visual equipment, industrial equipment, hazardous substances and/or teaching/dealing with people, driving a vehicle, dealing with emergency situations, construction. This process is about finding what could cause harm in work task or area. Risk: The likelihood, or possibility, that harm (injury, illness, death, damage etc) may occur from exposure to a hazard. Risk Assessment: Is defined as the process of assessing the risks associated with each of the hazards identified so the nature of the risk can be understood. This includes the nature of the harm that may result from the hazard, the severity of that harm and the likelihood of this occurring. Please Be SAFE & ALERT. Trainer's Name - Mohd. Syeed Siddiqui https://www.linkedin.com/in/mohdsyeeds/ For any business related queries, please contact - [email protected] Like Us on Facebook www.fb.com/teamohse Follow us on Instagram @teamohse
Views: 8091 Team OHSE
Safety Oath at Construction Site  (Hindi) HD | Team OHSE
 
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Oath to be Safe at Work. With workplace fatalities on the rise, it is extremely important to put safety first on the job. Safety is everyone's responsibility, and you can show your commitment by taking our Safe At Work pledge. By Sr. HSE Engineer - Mohd. Syeed Siddiqui https://www.linkedin.com/in/mohdsyeeds/ For any business related queries, please contact - [email protected] Like Us on Facebook www.fb.com/teamohse Follow us on Instagram @teamohse
Views: 885 Team OHSE
Fire Extinguisher (Hindi) | Corporate Safety Training | Team OHSE
 
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This video provides all the information about the Fire Extinguisher and how to use it properly. (Corporate Training) Please Like, Share & Subscribe. For any business related queries, please contact - [email protected] Like Us on Facebook www.fb.com/teamohse Follow us on Instagram @teamohse
Views: 61411 Team OHSE
Working In Confined Space (Hindi) HD | Class Room Safety Training | Team OHSE
 
37:58
Confined Space refers to any place, including any vessel, tank, container, pit, bund, chamber, cellar or any other similar space which, by virtue of its enclosed nature, creates conditions that give rise to a likelihood of an accident, harm or injury of such a nature as to require emergency action due to the presence or reasonably foreseeable presence of: - flammable or explosive atmospheres - harmful gas, fume or vapor - free-flowing solid or an increased level of liquid - excess of oxygen - excessively high temperature the lack or reasonably foreseeable lack of oxygen The key characteristics of a confined space are: Space must be substantially enclosed there must be a risk of at least one of the hazards listed above occurring within the space the risk of serious injury from the hazard must be created by virtue of the enclosed nature of the space the potential injury must be serious and be such as to require emergency action to rescue the person involved. The hazards associated confined spaces include: Toxic Atmosphere A toxic atmosphere may cause various acute effects, including impairment of judgment, unconsciousness, and death. A toxic atmosphere may occur due to the presence or ingress of hazardous substances. These substances may be present in the Confined Space for various reasons such as: - remaining from previous processing or storage - arising from the disturbance of sludge and other deposits - the presence of a fire or flames within the space - seepage from improperly isolated adjoining plant - formation during the work processes carried out in the space - being released from under scale and in brickwork as a result of the work process Oxygen Deficiency Oxygen can be lacking a confined space for the following reasons: - displacement of air by another gas - various biological processes or chemical reactions (such as rotting of organic matter, rusting of metals, burning, etc) - absorption of air onto steel surfaces, especially where these are damp Oxygen Enrichment An excess of oxygen, in the presence of combustible materials, results in an increased risk of fire and explosion. Some materials, which do not burn in air, may burn vigorously or even spontaneously in an enriched oxygen atmosphere. Flammable or Explosive Atmospheres A flammable atmosphere presents a risk of fire or explosion. Such an atmosphere can arise from the presence in the confined space of flammable liquids or gases or of a suspension of combustible dust in the air. If a flammable atmosphere inside a confined space ignites, an explosion may occur, resulting in the expulsion of hot gases and the disintegration of the structure. Flowing Liquid or Free Flowing Solids Liquids or solids can flow into the confined space causing drowning, suffocation, burns and other injuries. Solids in powder form may also be disturbed in a confined space resulting in an asphyxiating atmosphere. Excessive Heat The enclosed nature of a confined space can increase the risk of heat stroke or collapse from heat stress if conditions are excessively hot. The risk may be exacerbated by the wearing of personal protective equipment or by lack of ventilation. Trainer's Name - Mohd. Syeed Siddiqui https://www.linkedin.com/in/mohdsyeeds/ For any business related queries, please contact - [email protected] Like Us on Facebook www.fb.com/teamohse Follow us on Instagram @teamohse
Views: 7546 Team OHSE
How to Use a Fire Extinguisher- Drill (Hindi) | Corporate Safety Training | Team OHSE
 
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Properly using a fire extinguisher in the workplace A simple fire extinguisher training technique to use with employees is the PASS method: Pull the pin on the extinguisher. Aim the hose nozzle low toward the base of the fire. Squeeze the handle to release the extinguishing agent. Sweep the nozzle from side to side at the base of the flames until extinguished. Knowing how to operate the extinguisher is not the end of training. Employee responders to a fire also should be trained to adhere to the following protocol: If appropriate, sound the fire alarm or call the fire department immediately. Before approaching the fire, determine an evacuation route safe of flames, excessive heat, and smoke. Do not allow this evacuation route to become blocked. Use the PASS technique for discharging an extinguisher and back away from the area if the fire flares up again. If the extinguisher is empty and the fire is not out, evacuate immediately. If the fire grows beyond what can be safely handled, evacuate immediately. Fire extinguishers are meant to handle only small fires. If a fire becomes too large or the environment becomes too dangerous, employees should know when and how to evacuate the area. Please Like, Share & Subscribe. For any business related queries, please contact - [email protected] Like Us on Facebook www.fb.com/teamohse Follow us on Instagram @teamohse
Views: 1557 Team OHSE
Hazard Identification and Risk Assessment (HIRA) Part-3/3 (Hindi) HD | Safety Training | Team OHSE
 
23:32
Hazard: Anything (e.g. condition, situation, practice, behavior) that has the potential to cause harm, including injury, disease, death, environmental, property and equipment damage. A hazard can be a thing or a situation. Hazard Identification: This is the process of examining each work area and work task for the purpose of identifying all the hazards which are “inherent in the job”. Work areas include but are not limited to machine workshops, laboratories, office areas, agricultural and horticultural environments, stores and transport, maintenance and grounds, reprographics, and lecture theatres and teaching spaces. Tasks can include (but may not be limited to) using screen-based equipment, audio and visual equipment, industrial equipment, hazardous substances and/or teaching/dealing with people, driving a vehicle, dealing with emergency situations, construction. This process is about finding what could cause harm in work task or area. Risk: The likelihood, or possibility, that harm (injury, illness, death, damage etc) may occur from exposure to a hazard. Risk Assessment: Is defined as the process of assessing the risks associated with each of the hazards identified so the nature of the risk can be understood. This includes the nature of the harm that may result from the hazard, the severity of that harm and the likelihood of this occurring. Please Be SAFE & ALERT. Trainer's Name - Mohd. Syeed Siddiqui https://www.linkedin.com/in/mohdsyeeds/ For any business related queries, please contact - [email protected] Like Us on Facebook www.fb.com/teamohse Follow us on Instagram @teamohse
Views: 5129 Team OHSE
Responsibilities at Workplace regarding H & S (Hindi) HD | Class Room Safety Training | Team OHSE
 
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Employer's responsibilities It is an employer's duty to protect the health, safety, and welfare of their employees and other people who might be affected by their business. Employers must do whatever is reasonably practicable to achieve this. This means making sure that workers and others are protected from anything that may cause harm, effectively controlling any risks to injury or health that could arise in the workplace. Employers have duties under health and safety law to assess risks in the workplace. Risk assessments should be carried out that address all risks that might cause harm in your workplace. Employers must give you information about the risks in your workplace and how you are protected, also instruct and train you on how to deal with the risks. Employers must consult employees on health and safety issues. Consultation must be either direct or through a safety representative that is either elected by the workforce or appointed by a trade union. Employees' health and safety responsibilities Employers have legal responsibilities to ensure a safe and healthy workplace. As an employee you have rights and you have responsibilities for your own wellbeing and that of your colleagues. This article explains what these responsibilities are, and how you can meet them. Your rights Your rights as an employee to work in a safe and healthy environment are given to you by law and generally can't be changed or removed by your employer. The most important of these rights are: as far as possible, to have any risks to your health and safety properly controlled to be provided with any personal protective and safety equipment free of charge to stop work and leave your work area, without being disciplined if you have reasonable concerns about your safety to tell your employer about any health and safety concerns you have Your responsibilities Your most important responsibilities as an employee are: to take reasonable care of your own health and safety if possible to avoid wearing jewellery or loose clothing if operating machinery if you have long hair, or wear a headscarf, make sure it's tucked out of the way as it could get caught in machinery to take reasonable care not to put other people - fellow employees and members of the public - at risk by what you do or don't do in the course of your work to co-operate with your employer, making sure you get proper training and you understand and follow the company's health and safety policies not to interfere with or misuse anything that's been provided for your health, safety or welfare to report any injuries, strains or illnesses you suffer as a result of doing your job, your employer may need to change the way you work to tell your employer if something happens that might affect your ability to work, like becoming pregnant or suffering an injury - because your employer has a legal responsibility for your health and safety, they may need to suspend you while they find a solution to the issue or problem, but you will normally be paid if this happens if you drive or operate machinery, you have a responsibility to tell your employer if you take medication that makes you drowsy - if you have, they should temporarily move you to another job if they have one for you to do Trainer's Name - Mohd. Syeed Siddiqui https://www.linkedin.com/in/mohdsyeeds/ For any business related queries, please contact - [email protected] Like Us on Facebook www.fb.com/teamohse Follow us on Instagram @teamohse
Views: 2102 Team OHSE
How To (Safely) Demolish A Building (Hindi) HD | Class Room Safety Training | Team OHSE
 
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All demolition, dismantling, and structural alteration must be carefully planned and carried out in a way that prevents danger by practitioners with the relevant skills, knowledge, and experience. Key issues are: Falls from height Injury from falling materials Uncontrolled collapse Risks from connected services Traffic management Hazardous materials Noise and vibration Fire Worker involvement Falls from height During demolition and dismantling, workers can be injured falling from edges, through openings, fragile surfaces and partially demolished floors. Dutyholders have a responsibility to assess, eliminate and control the risks of falls from height. Find out more about falls from height. Injury from falling materials Workers and passers-by can be injured by the premature and uncontrolled collapse of structures, and by flying debris. A safe system of work is one that keeps people as far as possible from the risks. This may include: Establishing exclusion zones and hard-hat areas Clearly marked and with barriers or hoardings if necessarily covered walkways using high-reach machines reinforcing machine cabs so that drivers are not injured. Training and supervising site workers Uncontrolled collapse The structural survey should consider: The age of the structure Its previous use The type of construction Nearby buildings or structures The weight of removed material or machinery on floors above ground level The method statement for the demolition should identify the sequence required to prevent accidental collapse of the structure. Risks from connected services Gas, electricity, water and telecommunications services need to be isolated or disconnected before demolition work begins. If this is not possible, pipes and cables must be labelled clearly, to make sure they are not disturbed. Traffic management Effective traffic management systems are essential on site, to avoid putting workers at risk of being hit by vehicles turning, slewing, or reversing. Where possible, vision aids and zero tail swing machines should be used. Find out more about traffic management Hazardous materials Hazardous materials that should be considered include dust, asbestos and respirable crystalline silica (RCS).There may also be material or contamination on site that has not been cleared, for example: Acids from industrial processes Paints Flammable liquids Unidentified drums Microbiological hazards (especially in old hospital buildings). Find out more about the control of substances hazardous to health (COSHH) Noise and vibration Frequent exposure to loud noise can permanently damage a persons hearing. Noise can also create a safety risk if it makes it difficult for workers to communicate effectively or stops them hearing warning signals. More information on noise at work Vibrating hand tools used in demolition can cause hand-arm vibration syndrome (HAVS).Workers exposure to vibration must be managed and reduced as far as possible. Fire Fire is a risk where hot work (using any tools that generate spark, flame or heat) is being done. During structural alteration, the fire plan must be kept up to date as the escape routes and fire points may alter. There must be an effective way to raise the alarm. Worker involvement Everyone involved must know what precautions are to be taken on site. Workplaces where employees are involved in taking decisions about health and safety are safer and healthier. Your employees are often the best people to understand the risks in their workplace. Find out more about involving your workers in health and safety. Trainer's Name - Mohd. Syeed Siddiqui https://www.linkedin.com/in/mohdsyeeds/ For any business related queries, please contact - [email protected] Like Us on Facebook www.fb.com/teamohse Follow us on Instagram @teamohse
Views: 1961 Team OHSE
Health & Safety Management System - POLICY (Hindi) | Class Room Safety Training | Team OHSE
 
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Explaining Health & Safety Management System - POLICY Objective, Purpose, and Targets of H&S Policy Key elements of H & S Policy General Statement of Intent Organization section Arrangement Section. For any business related queries, please contact - [email protected] Like Us on Facebook www.fb.com/teamohse Follow us on Instagram @teamohse
Views: 4650 Team OHSE
Leadership in Health, Safety & Environment (Hindi) | Class Room Safety Training | Team OHSE
 
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Leadership In Managing HSE. Leadership Styles in managing people in the workplace for health, safety & environment (HSE). For any business related queries, please contact - [email protected] Like Us on Facebook www.fb.com/teamohse Follow us on Instagram @teamohse
Views: 1247 Team OHSE
Fire Hydrant Drill -  Part 1 (Hindi) | Corporate Safety Training | Team OHSE
 
02:00
This video will teach you how to use a fire hydrant. Everything you need to know about operating a fire hydrant. Please Like, Share & Subscribe For any business related queries, please contact - [email protected] Like Us on Facebook www.fb.com/teamohse Follow us on Instagram @teamohse
Views: 1621 Team OHSE
Foundation Health & Safety - ORGANIZING (Hindi) | Class Room Safety Training | Team OHSE
 
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Explaining Foundation of Health & Safety Objective, Purpose, and Targets of H&S Key elements in foundation of Health and Safety Responsibilities Employee and Employees Senior Managers and Directors Health and safety specialist. Contractors and Sub Contractors. For any business related queries, please contact - [email protected] Like Us on Facebook www.fb.com/teamohse Follow us on Instagram @teamohse
Views: 804 Team OHSE
The Beauty of Moon with Canon PowerShot SX 60HS
 
01:27
Moon zoom test with the Canon PowerShot SX60 HS. Stay tuned for more HSE training videos. For any business related queries, please contact - [email protected] Like Us on Facebook www.fb.com/teamohse Follow us on Instagram @teamohse
Views: 143 Team OHSE
Failure of Fire Extinguisher Due to Non Maintenance (Hindi) | Corporate Safety Training | Team OHSE
 
01:16
Properly using a fire extinguisher in the workplace A simple fire extinguisher training technique to use with employees is the PASS method: Pull the pin on the extinguisher. Aim the hose nozzle low toward the base of the fire. Squeeze the handle to release the extinguishing agent. Sweep the nozzle from side to side at the base of the flames until extinguished. Knowing how to operate the extinguisher is not the end of training. Employee responders to a fire also should be trained to adhere to the following protocol: If appropriate, sound the fire alarm or call the fire department immediately. Before approaching the fire, determine an evacuation route safe from flames, excessive heat, and smoke. Do not allow this evacuation route to become blocked. Use the PASS technique for discharging an extinguisher and back away from the area if the fire flares up again. If the extinguisher is empty and the fire is not out, evacuate immediately. If the fire grows beyond what can be safely handled, evacuate immediately. Fire extinguishers are meant to handle only small fires. If a fire becomes too large or the environment becomes too dangerous, employees should know when and how to evacuate the area. Please Like, Share & Subscribe. For any business related queries, please contact - [email protected] Like Us on Facebook www.fb.com/teamohse Follow us on Instagram @teamohse
Views: 242 Team OHSE
Motivation & Communication in HSE (Hindi) | Class Room Safety Training | Team OHSE
 
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Motivation & Communication In Managing HSE. Motivation & Communication in managing people at a workplace for health, safety & environment (HSE). For any business related queries, please contact - [email protected] Like Us on Facebook www.fb.com/teamohse Follow us on Instagram @teamohse
Views: 3000 Team OHSE
Fire Hydrant Drill - Part 2 (Hindi) | Corporate Safety Training | Team OHSE
 
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This video will teach you how to use a fire hydrant. Everything you need to know about operating a fire hydrant. Please Like, Share & Subscribe Like Us on Facebook www.fb.com/teamohse Follow us on Instagram @teamohse
Views: 528 Team OHSE