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Iodine Clock Reaction
 
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Views: 16512 Mark Blaser
Kinetics lab - rate law determination of iodination of acetone, determining activation energy
 
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Kinetics experiment where the reaction between iodine and acetone with acid catalyst is tracked for determination of the rate law with respect to iodine, acid and acetone concentrations. The rate constant is determined and then measured at two temperatures to determine the activation energy in J/mol by plotting ln k vs. 1/T to get a slope of -Ea/R.
Views: 15184 Scott Milam
Kinetics Part 1: Iodine Clock Reaction
 
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Discussion and data for kinetics part 1.
Views: 33244 Shau She
Rate determining step
 
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Rate determining step can seem difficult to work out. But with this simple explanation you should have no more problems with this exam favourite. Come complete with a cake method too. Take a look to see what I mean!
Views: 20639 Allery Chemistry
Chemical Kinetics
 
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A video demonstrating the CHEM 1001 experiment on chemical kinetics
Views: 33825 Bob Burk
Iodine Clock Reaction Chemical Experiment!
 
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Hello everyone. Today we will have a very unusual chemical reaction, called "Egyptian night" or the simplified version of the chemical pendulum. First, let's take a beaker and pour there a small amount of potassium iodide and sodium thiosulfate. Next dissolve this mixture into a 100 ml of water. Take a second beaker and dissolve there a little soluble potato starch. First, dissolve starch in a cold water, then pour boiling water into the beaker, to better dissolve starch. The solution becomes slightly cloudy. Next, pour starch solution to the first solution, where we have a mixture of potassium iodide and sodium thiosulfate. We get a little cloudy solution. Next, let's make a second working solution. That solution may be of a various concentrations. For this purpose I poured into each beaker a different amounts of 30% hydrogen peroxide, solution was acidified and the acid solution was diluted to 40 ml. We now carry out the reaction. I set the clock so you can see how the reaction occurs. In the main beaker I poured 20ml of the first working solution, and now I'm pouring the second working solution into the beaker. Time passes and the solution rapidly becomes black. The color change is a reaction between iodine and starch, starch as an indicator of iodine. Now take two beakers of the first working solution. Now, however, the second solution is with different concentrations and the reaction time can change. One, two, three, and mix solutions. The first solution reacts rapidly, but the second one is a bit longer. This reaction is quite beautiful and spectacular. You can play long enough with it. And now let's look at the color change in a slow motion. Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/thoisoi2 Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/Thoisoi?ty=h Music: http://audiomicro.com
Chemistry experiment 28 - Iodine clock reaction
 
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Famous iodine clock reaction: oxidation of potassium iodide by hydrogen peroxide. Mixture A: - 10 mL 2.0 M sulphuric acid - 10 mL 3% hydrogen peroxide - 80 mL water Mixture B: - Solution of 0.04 g sodium thiosulfate pentahydrate in 20 mL water - Solution of 0.9 g potassium iodide in 5 mL water - 4 mL starch solution - 71 mL water
Views: 151102 koen2all
Reaction Kinetics in Blue
 
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Explore the effect of temperature and concentration on the rate of fading of methylene blue. This video is part of the Flinn Scientific Best Practices for Teaching Chemistry Video Series, a collection of over 125 hours of free professional development training for chemistry teachers - http://elearning.flinnsci.com ATTENTION: This demonstration is intended for and should only be performed by certified science instructors in a safe laboratory/classroom setting. Be sure to subscribe and check out more videos! Subscribe: https://www.youtube.com/channel/FlinnScientific/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/FlinnScientific/ Website: https://www.flinnsci.com/
Views: 27898 FlinnScientific
Iodination of Acetone (2011aR)
 
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Description of the first week of the Rate and Activation Energy of the Iodination of Acetone experiment. {re-edited to fix audio/video sync problems.} Some of the technical aspects of the experiment are discussed on my blog (http://msumgenchem.blogspot.com/2012/02/kinetics-experiments-nuts-and-bolts.html)
Views: 8464 drbodwin
Reaction Rate Laws
 
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Watch more videos on http://www.brightstorm.com/science/chemistry SUBSCRIBE FOR All OUR VIDEOS! https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=brightstorm2 VISIT BRIGHTSTORM.com FOR TONS OF VIDEO TUTORIALS AND OTHER FEATURES! http://www.brightstorm.com/ LET'S CONNECT! Facebook ► https://www.facebook.com/brightstorm Pinterest ► https://www.pinterest.com/brightstorm/ Google+ ► https://plus.google.com/+brightstorm/ Twitter ► https://twitter.com/brightstorm_ Brightstorm website ► https://www.brightstorm.com/
Views: 532638 Brightstorm
Initial rates and the iodine clock
 
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Tick tock goes the Iodine clock! Well not quite. Explore this video to find out how we can measure the initial rate from reactions and how we can use clock reactions to do the same too. Find out how we can use this to find out the order of the reaction.
Views: 17319 Allery Chemistry
Chemical Kinetics 3
 
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Chemical Kinetics Lab
Views: 148 doughboi734
Incredible Chemical Reaction!
 
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Add me on Facebook. (click LIKE on Facebook to add me) http://www.facebook.com/brusspup Download the song in this video: Song name: Monolith iTunes https://itunes.apple.com/us/album/monolith-single/id596457486 Amazon http://www.amazon.com/Monolith/dp/B00B60NGFY/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1378343773&sr=8-1&keywords=monolith+brusspup There are no editing tricks in the video. All of the reactions that you see are uncut and play at the original speed. This is a classic chemical reaction. It's called the iodine clock reaction. There are several variations of how this chemical reaction can be performed using different chemicals than the ones I used in the video. You can order clock reaction kits from several science related websites. You can also use simple store bought chemicals like vitamin C, iodine, hydrogen peroxide and starch. A quick internet search will turn up multiple ways of performing the experiment. Even though I've played around with the clock reaction experiment before I've always wanted to capture the reaction as the liquid was being poured. To me, this is the most stunning way of demonstrating the reaction. Here's the other version of the clock reaction I made several years ago http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qeDhaWEEvfg
Views: 6349486 brusspup
Rate of Reaction of Sodium Thiosulfate and Hydrochloric Acid
 
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Vary the concentrations of reactants and measure the time it takes for product to appear. This video is part of the Flinn Scientific Best Practices for Teaching Chemistry Video Series, a collection of over 125 hours of free professional development training for chemistry teachers - http://elearning.flinnsci.com ATTENTION: This demonstration is intended for and should only be performed by certified science instructors in a safe laboratory/classroom setting. Be sure to subscribe and check out more videos! Subscribe: https://www.youtube.com/channel/FlinnScientific/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/FlinnScientific/ Website: https://www.flinnsci.com/
Views: 180981 FlinnScientific
Iodine clock reaction year 13 A-Level Chemistry
 
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An explanation of one of the iodine clock reactions. Part of the rates topic in A-Level Chemistry.
Views: 6240 Mr C Dunkley
Kinetics Clock Rxn Lab-3 Trials
 
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Sample data for chemistry students to use for determining the rate order of [H2O2] in the iodine clock reaction. Created on March 9, 2012
Views: 170 eknispel
Lab Experiment #19: Effect of Concentration on the Reaction Rate.
 
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This video is about the AP Chemistry Laboratory – Experiment #19: Effect of Concentration on the Rate of a Chemical Reaction. In this video you will learn how to determine the initial rate of a reaction by monitoring the amount of a product produced. In this case will be the hydrogen produced from the reaction between magnesium and hydrochloric acid. Moreover, you will be able to study the effect of concentration on the reaction rate.
Views: 10910 Ali Hayek
Calculating Reaction Rate from Your Lab Quest Data
 
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How to calculate reaction rate from your absorbance data!
Views: 22669 kirk kawagoe
2 CHM590Demo 2014 06 16 Iodine Clock
 
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2. Iodine Clock Iodine (I2) when added to starch produces a dark blue complex. Classic test for starch, Here we control the formation of iodine by varying the starting amount of potassium iodate (KIO3). Reaction i. Iodate and bisulfite reaction slowly produces iodide ion: This is the rate determining step. IO3- + 3 HSO3-  I- + 3 HSO4- ii. iodate in excess will oxidize the iodide generated above to form iodine, IO3- + 5 I- + 6 H+  3 I2 + 3 H2O iii. bisulfite reduces immediately back to iodide I2 + HSO3- + H2O  2 I- + HSO4- + 2 H+ When Bisulfite is consumed iodine will survive to form dark blue complex with starch.
Views: 116 Arb Anu
Experiment 20 Introduction and Sample Calculations
 
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In this video, I give an introduction to Experiment 20, which uses the method of initial rates to determine the rate law for the acid catalyzed iodination of acetone.
Views: 1731 Patrick Fleming
Iodine Clock Analysis
 
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This video describes how to analyze and graph the data for our Iodine Clock Reaction experiment in Grade 12 chemistry.
Views: 2744 chempatenaude
iodine propanone rate1
 
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Views: 256 Tine Willis
Experimental determination of rate laws | Knetics | Chemistry | Khan Academy
 
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Example using initial rates to find the order in each reactant, the overall order, and the rate constant k. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/science/chemistry/chem-kinetics/copy-of-kinetics/v/plotting-data-for-a-first-order-reaction?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=chemistry Missed the previous lesson? https://www.khanacademy.org/science/chemistry/chem-kinetics/reaction-rates/v/finding-units-of-rate-constant-k?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=chemistry Chemistry on Khan Academy: Did you know that everything is made out of chemicals? Chemistry is the study of matter: its composition, properties, and reactivity. This material roughly covers a first-year high school or college course, and a good understanding of algebra is helpful. About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s Chemistry channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCyEot66LrwWFEMONvrIBh3A?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Iodine Clock Teamwork
 
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Student groups were assigned varying molarities (0.046M to 0.018M) of potassium iodate to vary the reaction rate of the iodine clock. The other solution was a mix of water, starch, sulfuric acid and sodium bisulfite. Solution B is a complex solution of water, 10 seconds of liquid starch, 2.0 mL of 18M concentrated H2SO4 with 0.80 g of sodium bisulfite (NaHSO3) in 2000.0 mL of total solution volume. When the bisulfite ion is consumed, the reaction suddenly changes color because of the build up of triiodide Ion in the starch complex. When Solutions A and B are mixed, the chemicals start reacting immediately but the reaction to produce the dark bluish-black iodine complex seems to take time and hence this is called a clock reaction. In the first step, the iodate ion from the potassium iodate solution reacts with the bisulfite ion to produce colorless iodide and colorless bisulfate ions. This is the slowest or rate determining step of the reaction: IO3- (aq) + 3HSO3- (aq) → I- (aq) + 3HSO4-(aq) The second step is when the iodate in excess will oxidize the iodide generated above to form iodine (I2). IO3- (aq) + 5I- (aq) + 6H+ (aq) → 3I2 + 3H2O (l) Iodine is usually yellow-orange in color but in the presence of starch and excess iodide ion, the tri-iodine ion starch complex is formed which is bluish-black in color. The third reaction step are shown here and in the diagram in the top right: 3I2 + I-1 → I3-1 The reason there is a delay in color change in this chemical reaction is a fourth step occurs where the iodine is reduced immediately back to colorless iodide (I-1) by the bisulfite: I2 (aq) + HSO3- (aq) + H2O (l) → 2I- (aq) + HSO4-(aq) + 2H+ (aq) Only a small amount of bisulfite was used in this reaction so when the bisulphite is fully consumed, the iodine no longer reduced to colorless iodide so in an instant the dark blue complex with starch is formed producing the sudden color change but with a delayed reaction from the initial mixing. For other cool iodine clock reactions, check out these YouTube vidoes: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zTakExx4Buw https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UJV04umAb6w&t=12s https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Tv6_IsdnaGg
Views: 35 Loran Krysl
Speed up a chemical reaction
 
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Speed up a chemical reaction by using warmer water.
Views: 4786 Science Sparks
Iodine Clock.
 
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It is amazing how the change is so dramatic and has no warning. The first solution is Potassium Iodate. The second solution is vinegar, starch, and sodium bisulfite. This video has no special effects and is done in real time. When Solutions A and B are mixed, the chemicals start reacting immediately but the reaction to produce the dark bluish-black iodine complex seems to take time and hence this is called a clock reaction. In the first step, the iodate ion from the potassium iodate solution reacts with the bisulfite ion to produce colorless iodide and colorless bisulfate ions. This is the slowest or rate determining step of the reaction: IO3- (aq) + 3HSO3- (aq) → I- (aq) + 3HSO4-(aq) The second step is when the iodate in excess will oxidize the iodide generated above to form iodine (I2). IO3- (aq) + 5I- (aq) + 6H+ (aq) → 3I2 + 3H2O (l) Iodine is usually yellow-orange in color but in the presence of starch and excess iodide ion, the tri-iodine ion starch complex is formed which is bluish-black in color. The third reaction step are shown here and in the diagram in the top right: 3I2 + I-1 → I3-1 The reason there is a delay in color change in this chemical reaction is a fourth step occurs where the iodine is reduced immediately back to colorless iodide (I-1) by the bisulfite: I2 (aq) + HSO3- (aq) + H2O (l) → 2I- (aq) + HSO4-(aq) + 2H+ (aq) Only a small amount of bisulfite was used in this reaction so when the bisulphite is fully consumed, the iodine no longer reduced to colorless iodide so in an instant the dark blue complex with starch is formed producing the sudden color change but with a delayed reaction from the initial mixing.
Views: 18 Loran Krysl
Hydrolysis of t-ButylChloride. Kinetics. Experiment #5. SN1 Reaction.
 
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Chem 2700. Organic Chemistry I, University of Guelph.
Views: 6932 uofgchem2700
#UTeachARScholarship - Multi Step Iodine Clock Reaction
 
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Today, I demonstrate the Multi-Step Iodine Clock Reaction. With Meta-Sulfate and Iodate w/ starch mixed together, there are reactions taking place as the liquid is blank. The final reaction is noticed by when the liquid changes into a different color. #UTeachARScholarship
Reaction Rates! Determination of Rate Law with Sodium Thiosulfate and Hydrochloric Acid
 
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This video highlights methods in which the rate law and reaction orders for a chemical reaction can be determined using colorimetry. This is a collaborative project between Nicole Langlois, Nadine Hudson, and Stephanie Virgulto - students enrolled in the Spring 2015 CHEM 1117 Honors Lab course at the University of New Haven. Screen captures were made possible through the Screencast-O-Matic program. The background music was taken from the Marvel Cinematic Theme Song Universe at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Dnik1H_8cbg, all rights reserved to their respective owners.
Views: 5366 Nicole Langlois
Chemical Kinetics: Experiment 5
 
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Lab Experiment
Views: 1450 Travis Cervantez
Clock Reaction Part 3
 
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Describes the procedures for each part in the Clock Reaction Lab
Views: 1930 Sehat Nauli
clock reaction kinetic demo
 
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clock reaction kinetic demo
Views: Randy Mcclay
Iodination of Propanone | A-level Chemistry | OCR, AQA, Edexcel
 
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https://goo.gl/n2rnsu to unlock the full series of AS, A2 & A-level Chemistry videos created by A* students for the new OCR, AQA and Edexcel specification. This video will focus on: Rate experiments, Mechanism, Summary.
Views: 470 SnapRevise
Chem Demo:  Reaction Mechanism and Rate
 
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This is a video that depicts what happens when catalysts and inhibitors are added to a reaction.
Views: 1460 Mark Rosengarten
Sudsy Kinetics
 
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Take advantage of the overflowing fun in the "Old Foamy" reaction of hydrogen peroxide to teach students about the effect of concentration and the role of a catalyst on the rate of a chemical reaction. This video is part of the Flinn Scientific Best Practices for Teaching Chemistry Video Series, a collection of over 125 hours of free professional development training for chemistry teachers - http://elearning.flinnsci.com ATTENTION: This demonstration is intended for and should only be performed by certified science instructors in a safe laboratory/classroom setting. Be sure to subscribe and check out more videos! Subscribe: https://www.youtube.com/channel/FlinnScientific/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/FlinnScientific/ Website: https://www.flinnsci.com/
Views: 1621 FlinnScientific
Chemical Kinetics
 
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Iodine Clock Reaction
Views: 110 kineticsRIT
Fast reaction in slow
 
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Views: 131 Gaston Rings
Iodine and Starch Experiment | Iodine Experiment | Starch Experiment | Science experiments for kids
 
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Iodine and Starch Experiment | Iodine Experiment | Starch Experiment | Science experiments for kids Simple and easy experiment to demonstrate the iodine with starch reaction! For this test you will need: • Two test tubes • Soluble starch powder • Iodine solution • Water • Dropper Procedure: • Put some starch powder into a test tube and fill the test tube with water. • Mix the starch in the test tube well until the starch dissolves in the water. • Fill the other test tube with normal water. • Place both the test tubes in a test tube stand. • Using a dropper take iodine solution. • Put some drops in each test tube. • Observe that the test tube with starch solution turns to purple black color. • The other test tube with normal water retains the color of iodine i.e orange or yellow. Explanation: Starch is a mixture of amylose and amylopectin, which are different forms of glucose/starch. Amylose in starch is responsible for the formation of a deep blue black color. Amylase is long polymer chains of glucose units connected by an alpha acetal linkage and looks much like a coiled spring. However iodine is a potassium iodide reagent and it is not very soluble in water. So, iodine is prepared by dissolving it in water in an aqueous solution of potassium iodide. This results in a linear tri-iodide ion (I3−) complex in iodine which is soluble. This tri-iodide ion (I3−) slips into the coil of the starch causing an intense or deep blue-black color.
Views: 158998 Elearnin
iodine clock video
 
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30 seconds of a successful clock reaction preceded by 15 minutes of preparation - in this case worth it. Looks good from above - compares favourably with other clock reaction videos already on YouTube - at a high school in wester Adelaide, South Australia. you could actually time all the colour changes (they are in real time) and do rate calculations and graphing - almost painless!
Views: 82 Eddie Chem
Rates of reaction - Lesson 3 Measuring Rates of Reaction
 
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iGCSE - Rates of Reaction - Measuring Rates of Reaction
Views: 233 Chris Clay
Chemical Kinetics - Reaction rates
 
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Reaction rates with change in temperature
Views: 6769 Yuriy Yagud
Kinetics Demo
 
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Views: 59 Shaw Rast
IB Chemistry on iodine clock kinetics reaction using light sensor
 
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IB Chemistry on iodine clock kinetics reaction using light sensor
Views: 723 wkkok1957