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Types of firewall  | network firewall security | TechTerms
 
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Learn different types of firewall, types of firewall software, types of hardware firewall, different types of firewalls, types of firewalls, types firewall, types of firewalls in network security, different types of hardware firewalls, types of firewall, different types of firewall, firewall configuration types, firewall types, 7 types of firewall, types of firewall in network security, types of firewall with diagram, firewall and types of firewall, types of network firewalls, firewall and its types, what is firewall and types of firewall, types of firewall architecture, types of firewall in networking, different types of firewall in network security, what is firewall and write the types of firewall, types of firewall attacks, firewall and types, firewall types and configuration, different types of firewalls and their functions. Follow us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/DGTechTerms/ Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Technical_Terms Firewalls protect our computers from internet hackers. Internet hackers can steal our bank details from our computers and can reduce our bank balance from 1000s of dollars to 0 in seconds. So, firewall is must in a computer / computer network. Starting with packet filtering firewall. Suppose, I am downloading a file from internet. When the data-packet arrives a packet-filtering firewall, it only checks sender’s and receiver’s IP address and the port number. If the everything is OK, then data packet is allowed to pass through packet-filtering firewall and then to my computer. This checking process is done as per rules written in a list called access control list. The only limitation (caveats) of packet filtering firewall is that it do not checks the data portion, i.e. Payload, of the data packet. So, a hacker could send some malicious data packed in this payload section. The 2nd one is application / proxy firewall: proxy firewall do not let the web server know which computer actually wants to visit the requested website, i.e. proxy firewall hides us from the attackers in internet. Since, the application firewalls also check the data contents of the received data packet so they are generally much slower than packet-filtering firewalls. 3rd is Hybrid firewalls: Hybrid firewalls combines packet filtering firewall and application firewall in series to enhance the security. If they are connected in parallel then the security of the connection will be reduced to the parameters defined by the packet filtering firewall, i.e. application firewall will be of no use if the two firewalls are connected in parallel. For this reason, hybrid firewalls use packet filtering and application firewall in series. -~-~~-~~~-~~-~- Please watch: "Computer Network Administrator – 5 Important Questions and answers" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4mKcQ1_vQjc -~-~~-~~~-~~-~-
Views: 155002 TechTerms
Bitcoin Protocol Explained 1 - Bitcoin paper broken down step by step.
 
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Bitcoin Protocol Paper Playlist: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UieiMU-ImvI&list=PLQVvvaa0QuDcq2QME4pfeh0cE71mkb_qz&feature=share All Bitcoin Videos Playlist: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UieiMU-ImvI&feature=share&list=PLQVvvaa0QuDebbCxrDPCux6SzC1RET4mF In this video miniseries, the original Bitcoin paper is broken down. The paper is extremely condensed and is not very friendly to people who are not very familiar with the field. Since Bitcoin is for everyone, not just computer scientists and cryptologists, it is important than anyone can understand the basics of how Bitcoin and its protocol works as well as the problems it solves. It is my goal to help anyone confused about how the Bitcoin system works, and break it down so it can be understood by anyone. I may eventually cover mining as well specifically, but it is more important that most people understand the protocol and how it works as a system. The original paper: bitcoin.org/bitcoin.pdf http://seaofbtc.com http://sentdex.com http://hkinsley.com https://twitter.com/sentdex Bitcoin donations: 1GV7srgR4NJx4vrk7avCmmVQQrqmv87ty6
Views: 37799 sentdex
Heartbleed bug: How this dangerous computer security vulnerability works
 
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A bug was reported in the OpenSSL protocol, which up to two-thirds of websites rely on, late Monday evening that has serious and wide-ranging ramifications, according to a report by CNN. Internet traffic is typically easy for anyone to view, but using a protocol called SSL, the traffic between servers is encrypted. The newly discovered bug, dubbed "Heartbleed", however, opens a window of opportunity for a hacker to listen in on the traffic between computers. Using the bug, a hacker could randomly fish for data in the hopes of finding something valuable. While this process may seem tedious, hackers have tools at their disposal to sift through all the data files easily. Google, Microsoft and Apple have patched their systems, while Yahoo is said to be halfway through. There are other major tech companies that are still in the process of patching their systems, however. OpenSSL 1.0.1g patches the bug, but it will take some time before all IT departments in the world can apply the fix to their systems. Technology website The Verge reported that most banks, webapps and web hosting companies made the switch immediately and users are unlikely to face any immediate security threats. The reported bug, however, is nearly 2 years old, and there is no way of telling if it has been exploited before. Security experts are recommending that netizens change their passwords anyplace where sensitive data is currently stored.
Views: 1077 News Direct
Ceh V10 released || There is no multiple choice questions..
 
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Ceh v10 released || new modules asserted. || exam type also changed.. Read all the description carefully.. About the Certified Ethical Hacker (Practical) ----------------------- C|EH Practical is a six-hour, rigorous exam that requires you to demonstrate the application of ethical hacking techniques such as threat vector identification, network scanning, OS detection, vulnerability analysis, system hacking, web app hacking, etc. to solve a security audit challenge. his is the next step after you have attained the highly acclaimed Certified Ethical Hacker certification. Professionals that possess the C|EH credential will be able to sit for exam that will test them to their limits in unearthing vulnerabilities across major operating systems, databases, and networks. You will be given limited time, just like in the real world. The exam was developed by a panel of experienced SMEs and includes 20 real-life scenarios with questions designed to validate essential skills required in the ethical hacking domains as outlined in the C|EH program. You will be presented with scenarios and will be asked to demonstrate the application of the knowledge acquired in the C|EH course to find solutions to real-life challenges. CEH (Practical) Credential Holders Are Proven To Be Able To: Demonstrate the understanding of attack vectors Perform network scanning to identify live and vulnerable machines in a network. Perform OS banner grabbing, service, and user enumeration. Perform system hacking, steganography, steganalysis attacks, and cover tracks. Identify and use viruses, computer worms, and malware to exploit systems. Perform packet sniffing. Conduct a variety of web server and web application attacks including directory traversal, parameter tampering, XSS, etc. Perform SQL injection attacks. Perform different types of cryptography attacks. Perform vulnerability analysis to identify security loopholes in the target organization’s network, communication infrastructure, and end systems etc. U want to learn these topics listed above.. ———————————————————————— Training Course For the C|EH (Practical) ----- The preparatory course for this certification is the Certified Ethical Hacker course. While there is no additional course or training required, we strongly recommend that you attempt the C|EH (Practical) exam only if you have attended the current C|EH course/equivalent. The aim of this credential is to help set gifted ethical hacking practitioners apart from the crowd. About the Exam ------ Exam Title: Certified Ethical Hacker (Practical) Number of Practical Challenges: 20 Duration: 6 hours Availability: Aspen – iLabs Test Format: iLabs Cyber Range Passing Score: 70% What about a thumbs up 👍 If u learned something through this video Please hit a like 👍😎 If u want more to learn Consider Subscribing Make sure to hit the bell 🔔 ———————————————————————— My social links Make a personal contact with me Twitter : https://mobile.twitter.com/Ceh7019 Fb page: https://m.facebook.com/deepakceh/?ref=bookmarks ————————————————————————
Views: 797 Deepak Cyber Geeks
Introduction to Cryptoeconomics - Vitalik Buterin
 
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Slides: http://vitalik.ca/files/intro_cryptoeconomics.pdf
Views: 38674 Ethereum Foundation
TLS 1.2 Upgrade Testing - You Can't Sell Online Without TLS 1.2
 
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Grab Your Free 17-Point WordPress Pre-Launch PDF Checklist: http://vid.io/xqRL TLS 1.2 is coming so make sure you're payment processing is compatible with this TLS update. If it's not then you won't be able to process payments through your payment gateway. I show you how to test it in this short tutorial. TLS 1.2 Upgrade Testing - You Can't Sell Online Without TLS 1.2 https://youtu.be/RsQg7ySZ6Po Stop brute force attacks before they happen with this workshop: https://wplearninglab.com/brute-force-eliminator-workshop Grab your free 17-Point WordPress Pre-Launch PDF Checklist: http://vid.io/xqRL Download your exclusive 10-Point WP Security Checklist: http://bit.ly/10point-wordpress-hardening-checklist I hope this information helps you! If you have any questions leave a comment below or ping me @WPLearningLab on Twitter. -------------- If you want more excellent WordPress information check out our website where we post WordPress tutorials daily. https://wplearninglab.com/ Connect with us: WP Learning Lab Channel: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=wplearninglab Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/wplearninglab Twitter: https://twitter.com/WPLearningLab Google Plus: http://google.com/+Wplearninglab Pinterest: http://www.pinterest.com/wplearninglab/
NDSS2018 Removing Secrets from Android’s TLS
 
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SESSION 1B: Attacks and Vulnerabilities: 03 Removing Secrets from Android’s TLS. SUMMARY Cryptographic libraries that implement Transport Layer Security (TLS) have a responsibility to delete cryptographic keys once they’re no longer in use. Any key that’s left in memory can potentially be recovered through the actions of an attacker, up to and including the physical capture and forensic analysis of a device’s memory. This paper describes an analysis of the TLS library stack used in recent Android distributions, combining a C language core (BoringSSL) with multiple layers of Java code (Conscrypt, OkHttp, and Java Secure Sockets). We first conducted a black-box analysis of virtual machine images, allowing us to discover keys that might remain recoverable. After identifying several such keys, we subsequently pinpointed undesirable interactions across these layers, where the higherlevel use of BoringSSL’s reference counting features, from Java code, prevented BoringSSL from cleaning up its keys. This interaction poses a threat to all Android applications built on standard HTTPS libraries, exposing master secrets to memory disclosure attacks. We found all versions we investigated from Android 4 to the latest Android 8 are vulnerable, showing that this problem has been long overlooked. The Android Chrome application is proven to be particularly problematic. We suggest modest changes to the Android codebase to mitigate these issues, and have reported these to Google to help them patch the vulnerability in future Android systems. SLIDES http://wp.internetsociety.org/ndss/wp-content/uploads/sites/25/2018/03/NDSS2018_01B-3_Lee_Slides.pdf PAPER https://www.ndss-symposium.org/wp-content/uploads/sites/25/2018/02/ndss2018_01B-3_Lee_paper.pdf AUTHORS Jaeho Lee (Rice University) Dan S. Wallach (Rice University) Network and Distributed System Security (NDSS) Symposium 2018, 18-21 February 2018, Catamaran Resort Hotel & Spa in San Diego, California. https://www.ndss-symposium.org/ndss2018/programme/ ABOUT NDSS The Network and Distributed System Security Symposium (NDSS) fosters information exchange among researchers and practitioners of network and distributed system security. The target audience includes those interested in practical aspects of network and distributed system security, with a focus on actual system design and implementation. A major goal is to encourage and enable the Internet community to apply, deploy, and advance the state of available security technologies. https://www.ndss-symposium.org/ #NDSS #NDSS18 #NDSS2018 #InternetSecurity
Views: 151 NDSS Symposium
Malware Analysis   Quick PDF Analysis
 
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Ring Ø Labs report and sample download here: http://www.ringzerolabs.com/2017/08/we-show-how-to-quickly-analyze.html Ring Ø Labs Analysis Environment Setup: https://www.youtube.com/edit?o=U&video_id=Onqql1Zz3OE Ring Ø Labs is a Reverse Engineering site dedicated to analyzing malware, researching emergent security topics, and hacking the planet. www.RingZeroLabs.com Here are some approaches in reverse engineering a malware sample: Reverse engineer: The most obvious approach is to completely reverse engineer a piece of malware. This obviously takes a great amount of time, so other approaches are more practical. Exploitation techniques: Another approach you can take is to focus on the exploitation techniques of a piece of malware. Occasionally you will see a piece of malware that is using a new exploitation technique, or is exploiting a zero-day vulnerability. In this case you may be interested only in the specific exploitation technique so you can timebox your analysis and only look at the exploitation mechanisms. Obfuscation: Malware will often obfuscate itself and make itself difficult to analyze. You might come across malware that you have seen before without obfuscation. In that case you may only want to focus on reverse engineering the new parts. Encryption methods: A common type of malware these days is ransomware. Ransomware essentially encrypts the victim's files and locks them up so that they can't be accessed or read. Oftentimes the authors of ransomware will make mistakes when they implement the encryption mechanisms. So if you focus your research on the encryption mechanisms you might be able to find weaknesses in their implementation and/or you might be able to find hard-coded keys or weak algorithms. C&C communication: This is something that is pretty commonly done when looking at malware. Analysts often want to figure out what the communication protocol is between a piece of malware on the client's side and the server on the command and control side. The communication protocol can actually give you a lot of hints about the malware’s capabilities. Attribution: Murky area - kind of like a dark art. It usually involves a lot of guesswork, knowledge of malicious hacking teams and looking at more than one piece of malware. Categorization and clustering: You can reverse engineer malware from a broader point of view. This involves looking at malware in bulk and doing a broad-stroke analysis on lots of different malware, rather than doing a deep dive. Techniques Now, let’s look at techniques that can be utilized while analyzing malware. First of all, we use static analysis. This is the process of analyzing malware or binaries without actually running them. It can be as simple as looking at metadata from a file. It can range from doing disassembly or decompilation of malware code to symbolic execution, which is something like virtual execution of a binary without actually executing it in a real environment. Conversely, dynamic analysis is the process of analyzing a piece of malware when you are running it in a live environment. In this case, you are often looking at the behavior of the malware and looking at the side effects of what it is doing. You are running tools like process monitor and sysmon to see what kinds of artifacts a piece of malware produces after it is run. We also use automated analysis. Oftentimes if you are looking at malware you want to automate things just to speed up the process to save time. However, use caution, as with automated analysis sometimes things get missed because you are trying to do things generically. If a piece of malware contains things like anti-debugging routines or anti-analysis mechanisms, you may want to perform a manual analysis. You need to pick the right tools for the job. DISCLAIMER: Our videos are strictly for documentary, educational, and entertainment purposes only. Imitation or the use of any acts depicted in these videos is solely AT YOUR OWN RISK. We (including YouTube) will not be held liable for any injury to yourself or damage to others resulting from attempting anything shown in any our videos. We do not endorse any specific product and this video is not an attempt to sell you a good or service. These videos are free to watch and if anyone attempts to charge for this video notify us immediately. By viewing or flagging this video you are acknowledging the above.
Views: 469 H4rM0n1cH4cK
How the Krack Hack Breaks Wi-Fi Security
 
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To support SciShow and learn more about Brilliant, go to https://brilliant.org/Scishow. After 14 years of going unnoticed, a vulnerability in Wi-Fi security was published last week. It's a serious problem, but it's already in the process of being fixed. We're conducting a survey of our viewers! If you have time, please give us feedback: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/SciShowSurvey2017 Hosted by: Stefan Chin ---------- Support SciShow by becoming a patron on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/scishow ---------- Dooblydoo thanks go to the following Patreon supporters: Kevin Bealer, Mark Terrio-Cameron, KatieMarie Magnone, Inerri, D.A. Noe, Charles Southerland, Fatima Iqbal, سلطان الخليفي, Nicholas Smith, Tim Curwick, Scott Satovsky Jr, Philippe von Bergen, Bella Nash, Chris Peters, Patrick D. Ashmore, Piya Shedden, Charles George ---------- Looking for SciShow elsewhere on the internet? Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/scishow Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/scishow Tumblr: http://scishow.tumblr.com Instagram: http://instagram.com/thescishow ---------- Sources: https://www.krackattacks.com/?_ga=2.191235242.1088205245.1508159331-752582413.1498767319 https://papers.mathyvanhoef.com/ccs2017.pdf https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9M8kVYFhMDw https://www.wired.com/story/krack-wi-fi-wpa2-vulnerability/ https://www.lifewire.com/what-is-wpa2-818352 https://www.techopedia.com/definition/27188/four-way-handshake https://www.wired.com/story/krack-wi-fi-iot-security-broken/ http://smallbusiness.chron.com/s-https-stand-for-64240.html
Views: 359246 SciShow
SSL Certificate Explained
 
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Views: 785740 dtommy1979
KRACK Attacks: Bypassing WPA2 against Android and Linux
 
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This video explains some of the academic research performed in the ACM CCS 2017 paper "Key Reinstallation Attacks: Forcing Nonce Reuse in WPA2". It's not a guide or tutorial on how to hack people. Instead, the video was made to make people aware of potential risks, and to motivate everyone to update their smartphone and laptop. By updating your devices you (normally) avoid the risks mentioned in the video! For additional information visit https://www.krackattacks.com Note that devices different from Android and Linux are less affected by the attack. That's because only Android and Linux (re)install an all-zero encryption key.
Views: 1043629 Mathy Vanhoef
Blackhat 2012 EUROPE  - HDMI - Hacking Displays Made Interesting
 
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This video is part of the Infosec Video Collection at SecurityTube.net: http://www.securitytube.net Blackhat 2012 EUROPE - HDMI - Hacking Displays Made Interesting https://media.blackhat.com/bh-eu-12/Davis/bh-eu-12-Davis-HDMI-WP.pdf https://media.blackhat.com/bh-eu-12/Davis/bh-eu-12-Davis-HDMI-Slides.pdf Picture this scene, which happens thousands of times every day all around the world: Someone walks into a meeting room, sees a video cable and plugs it into their laptop. The other end of the cable is out of sight . it just disappears through a hole in the table. What is it connected to? Presumably the video projector bolted to the ceiling, but can it be trusted to just display their PowerPoint presentation?... This presentation discusses the security of video drivers which interpret and process data supplied to them by external displays, projectors and KVM switches. It covers all the main video standards, including VGA, DVI, HDMI and DisplayPort. It also details the construction of a hardware-based EDID fuzzer using an Arduino Microcontroller and a discussion of some of its findings.
Views: 2881 SecurityTubeCons
Critical .zip vulnerabilities? - Zip Slip and ZipperDown
 
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What is going on with .zip files. What is this new critical vulnerability that seems to affect everything? ... old is new again. Resources: - ZipperDown: https://zipperdown.org/ - Zip Slip: https://snyk.io/research/zip-slip-vulnerability - Zip Specification: https://pkware.cachefly.net/webdocs/casestudies/APPNOTE.TXT - The Complete Guide to Hacking WWIV: http://phrack.org/issues/34/5.html#article - Go library Fix Bypass: https://github.com/mholt/archiver/pull/65#issuecomment-395988244 Gynvael: - Hacking Livestream #53: The ZIP file format https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X7j2sisMKzk - Ten thousand security pitfalls: the ZIP file format http://gynvael.coldwind.pl/?id=682 - GynvaelEN Channel: https://www.youtube.com/GynvaelEN - Twitter: https://twitter.com/gynvael Ange Albertini / Corkami - Funky Fileformats Talk: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hdCs6bPM4is - Funky Fileformats Slides: https://events.ccc.de/congress/2014/Fahrplan/system/attachments/2562/original/Funky_File_Formats.pdf - Twitter: https://twitter.com/angealbertini / https://twitter.com/corkami -------------------------------------- Twitter: https://twitter.com/LiveOverflow Website: http://liveoverflow.com/ Subreddit: https://www.reddit.com/r/LiveOverflow/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/LiveOverflow/
Views: 35735 LiveOverflow
Will Quantum Computers break encryption?
 
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How do you secure messages over the internet? How do quantum computers break it? How do you fix it? Why don't you watch the video to find out? Why does this description have so many questions? Why are you still reading? What is the meaning of life? Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/frameofessence Twitter: https://twitter.com/frameofessence YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/user/frameofessence CLARIFICATIONS: You don't actually need a quantum computer to do quantum-safe encryption. As briefly mentioned at 7:04 , there are encryption schemes that can be run on regular computers that can't be broken by quantum computers. CORRECTIONS: [2:18] Technically, you can use any key to encrypt or decrypt whatever you want. But there's a specific way to use them that's useful, which is what's shown in the video. [5:36] In RSA, depending on exactly what you mean by "private key", neither key is actually derivable from the other. When they are created, they are generated together from a common base (not just the public key from the private key). But typically, the file that stores the "private key" actually contains a bit more information than just the private key. For example, in PKCS #1 RSA private key format ( https://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc3447#appendix-A.1.2 ), the file technically contains the entire public key too. So in short, you technically can't get the public key from the private key or vice versa, but the file that contains the private key can hold more than just the private key alone, making it possible to retrieve the public key from it. Video links: Encryption and HUGE numbers - Numberphile https://youtu.be/M7kEpw1tn50 The No Cloning Theorem - minutephysics https://youtu.be/owPC60Ue0BE Quantum Entanglement & Spooky Action at a Distance - Veritasium https://youtu.be/ZuvK-od647c Sources: Quantum Computing for Computer Scientists http://books.google.ca/books/about/Quantum_Computing_for_Computer_Scientist.html?id=eTT0FsHA5DAC Random person talking about Quantum MITM attacks http://crypto.stackexchange.com/questions/2719/is-quantum-key-distribution-safe-against-mitm-attacks-too The Ekert Protocol (i.e. E91) http://www.ux1.eiu.edu/~nilic/Nina's-article.pdf Annealing vs. Universal Quantum Computers https://medium.com/quantum-bits/what-s-the-difference-between-quantum-annealing-and-universal-gate-quantum-computers-c5e5099175a1 Images, Documents, and Screenshots: Post-Quantum Cryptography initiatives http://csrc.nist.gov/groups/ST/post-quantum-crypto/cfp-announce-dec2016.html http://pqcrypto.eu.org/docs/initial-recommendations.pdf Internet map (Carna Botnet) http://census2012.sourceforge.net/ Quantum network maps https://www.slideshare.net/ADVAOpticalNetworking/how-to-quantumsecure-optical-networks http://www.secoqc.net/html/press/pressmedia.html IBM Quantum http://research.ibm.com/ibm-q/ Music: YouTube audio library: Blue Skies Incompetech: Jay Jay Pamgaea The House of Leaves Premium Beat: Cutting Edge Technology Second Time Around Swoosh 1 sound effect came from here: http://soundbible.com/682-Swoosh-1.html ...and is under this license: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/sampling+/1.0/
Views: 365136 Frame of Essence
Grid+ ICO Review - Blockchain Lowering Energy Costs? Grid PLUS
 
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Grid+ or Grid Plus is a energy platform ICO taking place on Oct 30th. It is the brain child of several Consensys developers. Grid + aims to revolutionize the energy industry anywhere it is deregulated by bringing blockchain technology and security in to replace the retailers that are currently marking up prices by as much as 100% Tell us what you think of Grid + in the comments below.! Big Thanks to all viewers, subscribers, those who have hit like! You all have been superb. ▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬ 🔒 Secure your cryptocurrency🔒 https://www.ledgerwallet.com/r/30d7?path=/products/ledger-nano-s&tracker=MY_TRACKER ▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬ ⚡Connect with me: ⚡ https://twitter.com/CryptoTrill https://steemit.com/@trillinair ▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬ 💬 Talk about Crypto💬 https://discordapp.com/invite/GRTFXK6 ▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬ ⭐Buy anything on Amazon, and you help the channel get equipment that will amazeeee you at no additional cost to you!⭐ https://goo.gl/xFrtJC ▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬ 💰Buy Bitcoin or Ethereum safely with💰 Coinbase: https://www.coinbase.com/join/58b933a9b877036605f6ec35 ▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬ 🌎Help the channel get a quality shotgun microphone for outdoor adventuring without all the nooooiseee🌎 Bitcoin: 1GiS6mWGsJEchvuHSQ9tLL97Yg2oqhR3bW Ethereum: 0xd64ce2db1139b4e149709ca5b9cfb9d9134e09a0 Litecoin: LhcggKbgH7sNpnmi1CTqGZuSAJ8wWHLiDJ ▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬ Important links https://youtu.be/aIR8IOpT_fg Interview with Crypt0 https://blog.gridplus.io/pre-sale-recap-v2-5c46702e5bf3 pre sale detailed http://www.gridplus.io/ main page http://www.gridplus.io/assets/GRID-token-purchase-guide-v4.pdf Purchase guide https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Iw6rOY7LT88 Video tutorial if you’d like to purchase GRID+ ● Twitter: https://twitter.com/gridplus_energy ● Contact Email: [email protected]
Views: 1558 Trillinair
[ 2018 Cracked Version ] H12-722 HCNP-Security-CSSN V3.0 Real Dumps Questions | DumpsBase
 
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Dumpsbase just cracked the newest H12-722 HCNP-Security-CSSN version questions and answers for HCNP-Security candidates. H12-722 HCNP-Security-CSSN exam covers content security filtering technology, Web security, intrusion detection and prevention technology, anti-virus technology, network attack prevention technology, big data and cloud security technology. After you view all the free questions in the above H12-722 video you also could Free to test the following questions one by one. We hope H12-722 HCNP-Security-CSSN real questions could help you a lot. When misuse detection techniques are used, false positives are reported if the normal user behavior matches the intrusion signature repository successfully. A. True B. False Answer: A Which of the following options does not belong to the defense against HTTP flood attacks? A. HTTP Flood Source Authentication B. HTTP source statistics C. URI source fingerprint learning function D. Baseline learning Answer: D The status code in the HTTP response message describes the type of response message. There are many possible values. Which of the following status codes indicates that the resource requested by the client does not exist? A. 400 B. 404 C. 200 D. 503 Answer: B What are the three aspects that need to be considered when designing a cloud platform security solution? (Multiple choices) A. Infrastructure security B. Tenant security C. How to manage the operation and maintenance D. Hardware Maintenance Answer: ABC Regarding the local black and white list of anti-spam messages, which of the following statements is wrong? A. The black and white list is matched by extracting the destination IP address of the SMTP connection B. The black and white list is matched by the sender's dns suffix C. Black and white lists are matched by extracting the source IP address of the SMTP connection D. Block the connection if the source IP address of the SMTP connection matches the blacklist Answer: B Which of the following options does not belong to the characteristics of Trojans? A. Not self-replicating but parasitic B. Trojans replicate themselves C. Actively Infectious D. The ultimate intent is to steal information and implement remote monitoring Answer: C The security management system is optional, and anti-virus software or anti-hacking technology can be very good against network threats. A. True B. False Answer: B Which of the following protocols can be used to construct attack packets for special control packet attacks? (Multiple choices) A. ICMP protocol B. UDP protocol C. IP protocol D. FTP protocol Answer: ABC To protect the security of data transmission, more and more websites or companies choose to encrypt traffic through SSL. Which of the following statements is true about the threat detection of SSL traffic using Huawei NIP6000? A. NIP000 does not support SSL traffic threat detection. B. Threat-detected traffic is sent directly to the server without encryption. C. NIP can directly crack and detect SSL encryption. D. Processes such as "decryption," "threat detection," and "encryption." Answer: D Which of the following categories of sandbox can be used by a company to detect image files, shellcode code files, and PDF files? (Multiple choices) A. PDF inspired sandbox B. PE Heuristic Sandbox C. Web inspired sandbox D. Heavyweight sandbox (virtual execution) Answer: ACD If you still need to get more H12-722 HCNP-Security-CSSN (Constructing Service Security Network) exam questions you could view https://www.dumpsbase.com/h12-722.html
Views: 15 Huawei Dumpsbase
Lecture 8: Advanced Encryption Standard (AES) by Christof Paar
 
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For slides, a problem set and more on learning cryptography, visit www.crypto-textbook.com. The AES book chapter for this video is also available at the web site (click Sample Chapter).
KRACK - Key Reinstallation Attacks: Forcing Nonce Reuse in WPA2
 
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KRACK: https://www.krackattacks.com Read the paper! https://papers.mathyvanhoef.com/ccs2017.pdf Some interesting discussion about the formal protocol verification: https://blog.cryptographyengineering.com/2017/10/16/falling-through-the-kracks/ -------------------------------------- Twitter: https://twitter.com/LiveOverflow Website: http://liveoverflow.com/ Subreddit: https://www.reddit.com/r/LiveOverflow/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/LiveOverflow/
Views: 47868 LiveOverflow
Learn how to Digitally Sign Files, Documents, Emails and how to Authenticate Digital Signatures
 
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Quick and easy tutorial how to digitally sign and authenticate files and documents using Act On File. Learn how to send digiatlly signed emails, how to authenticate digiatlly signed emails, and how to generate public/private keys. http://www.mbbsoftware.com/Products/Act-On-File/2012/Download.aspx The Act on File Authenticator module is used to confirm or deny the identity, authenticity and integrity of files, data and entities (people, companies, etc). When receiving any important information, data or executable file, it should be authenticated and established that it is original (not produced by an imposter) and it has not been altered (intentionally or otherwise). An example when authentication is necessary is when receiving important data via email. If the content of the email does not raise immediate doubts, most people authenticate the message and data implicitly by comparing the email address of the sender with the email address that they expect to see. However, this is flawed since one can easily place whatever sender address they like by manipulating their email server. Such attacks are called Phishing and Spoofing and can be directed to exploit the recipient, the supposed sender, entirely unrelated third parties, or all of them. The Authenticator module of Act On File can be used to protect from such attacks, by digitally signing the data by the sender and authenticating it by the recipient. Another common example for authentication is to digitally sign the testimonials placed on a website. This allows the visitors of the website to automatically verify the testimonials and be sure that they are genuine and not made up. There are multiple other cases when it is important to establish the authenticity of data or document for which the Authenticator module can be used. Sometimes the authentication process may deal with establishing the integrity of a file, rather than its origin. For example, that a file has not been corrupted by errors during storage or transmission. A step-by-step technique on how to exchange information online safely is described in the Exact Steps to Exchange Emails Safely protocol here: http://www.mbbsoftware.com/Learning/Safe-Online-Communication.aspx. The mechanism for authenticated website testimonials is explained step-by-step in the How to Make Your Website Trusted protocol here: http://www.mbbsoftware.com/Learning/Make-Website-Trusted-Testimonial-Protocol/Default.aspx
Views: 5996 MBBSoftware
Movie Line Monday - Poodle Attack: 1,632 Cloud Apps Vulnerable
 
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http://www.netskope.com - As most of you have read, there’s another SSL exploit out there. As announced by OpenSSL.org (https://www.openssl.org/~bodo/ssl-poodle.pdf), the Poodle attack has been designed to take advantage of a vulnerability in the SSL V 3.0 protocol using the CBC mode encryption. Though a few other vulnerabilities were disclosed (https://www.openssl.org/news/secadv_20141015.txt), the Poodle attack seems to have gained much more attention. To be more specific about the vulnerability, the attack exploits the vulnerability found in the implementation of the CBC mode in SSL V 3.0 where in the padding bytes are not checked against any value nor covered by the message digest (MAC). The attack itself is complicated to carry out as it involves a client downgrade dance along with the attacker being the man-in-middle and having the ability to control/modify the traffic from the client to a server. Though the attack involves intricacy in execution, it is easy to carry out given today’s computing resources. - See more at: https://www.netskope.com/blog/poodle-attack-vulnerable-cloud-app-count/#sthash.BNPpGKM8.dpuf
Views: 3209 Netskope
How to Steer Clear of the 5 Biggest VoIP Security Threats - The VoIP Report
 
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Created by The VoIP Report http://thevoipreport.com Learn about the top VoIP security threats and how to prevent them from occurring at your company. Top 5 VoIP security threats: 1. Denial of service 2. Privacy threats 3. Service threats 4. Vishing 5. Spamming over Internet telephony This video was created from one of The VoIP Report's original infographics. View the infographic PDF on The VoIP Report: http://thevoipreport.com/how-to-steer-clear-of-the-5-biggest-voip-security-threats-infographic/ Transcript: The VoIP Report presents... How to Steer Clear of the Five Biggest VoIP Security Threats VoIP security threats are often overlooked and under-estimated, but the consequences are certainly real and can be costly. Consider the impact a security breach would have on your company, if your or your customers’ confidential data was leaked or hacked. Here are the Top 5 VoIP security threats: 1. During a Denial of Service attack, hackers flood bandwidth with spam or viruses to disrupt service and gain access. 2. A privacy threat is a form of eavesdropping – the unauthorized real-time interception of private communications. 3. During service threats, hackers steal your IP address to make calls – at your expense. 4. VoIP Fishing, or Vishing, is when a hacker poses as a trusted organization to gain access to confidential information – such as credit card or social security numbers. 5. Spamming over Internet Telephony, or “Spit”, congests the phone system with voicemail, causing the VoIP service to malfunction. While these 5 security threats sound scary, you CAN protect your system. First, secure your network with firewalls. Second, prevent data packet thefts by encrypting your data and connections. Third, create call controls and authentication. Request required credentials for every user. Taking these simple preventative steps and you'll be on your way to a secure VoIP system. For more information and resources on VoIP security practices, visit thevoipreport.com.
Views: 449 The VoIP Report
DEF CON 23 - Chris Sistrunk - NSM 101 for ICS - 101 Track
 
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Materials Available here: https://media.defcon.org/DEF%20CON%2023/DEF%20CON%2023%20presentations/DEFCON-23-Chris-Sistrunk-NSM-101-for-ICS.pdf NSM 101 for ICS Chris Sistrunk Sr. ICS Security Consultant, FireEye Is your ICS breached? Are you sure? How do you know? The current state of security in Industrial Control Systems is a widely publicized issue, but fixes to ICS security issues are long cycle, with some systems and devices that will unfortunately never have patches available. In this environment, visibility into security threats to ICS is critical, and almost all of ICS monitoring has been focused on compliance, rather than looking for indicators/evidence of compromise. The non-intrusive nature of Network Security Monitoring (NSM) is a perfect fit for ICS. This presentation will show how NSM should be part of ICS defense and response strategy, various options for implementing NSM, and some of the capabilities that NSM can bring to an ICS security program. Free tools such as Security Onion, Snort IDS, Bro IDS, NetworkMiner, and Wireshark will be used to look at the ICS environment for anomalies. It will be helpful if attendees have read these books (but they aren't required): The Cuckoo's Egg by Cliff Stoll, The Practice of Network Security Monitoring by Richard Bejtlich, and Applied Network Security Monitoring by Chris Sanders and Jason Smith. Chris Sistrunk is a Senior Consultant at Mandiant, focusing on cyber security for industrial control systems (ICS) and critical infrastructure. Prior to joining Mandiant, Chris was a Senior Engineer at Entergy (over 11 years) where he was the Subject Matter Expert (SME) for SCADA systems. He has 10 years of experience in SCADA systems with tasks such as standards development, system design, database configuration, testing, commissioning, troubleshooting, and training. He was the co-overseer of the SCADA, relay, and cyber security labs at Entergy for 6 years. Chris has been working with Adam Crain of Automatak on Project Robus, an ICS protocol fuzzing project that has found and helped fix many implementation vulnerabilities in DNP3, Modbus, and Telegyr 8979. Chris helped organize the first ICS Village, which debuted at DEF CON 22. He is a Senior Member of IEEE, Mississippi Infragard President, member of the DNP Users Group, and also is a registered PE in Louisiana. He holds a BS in Electrical Engineering and MS in Engineering and Technology Management from Louisiana Tech University. Chris also founded and organizes BSidesJackson, Mississippi's only cyber security conference. Twitter: @chrissistrunk https://www.facebook.com/chrissistrunk
Views: 3188 DEFCONConference
DTNS 3138 - Just say no to KRACK
 
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What you need to know about the KRACK WiFi vulnerability plus the RSA key debacle and progress on a virtual pancreas. With Tom Merritt, Sarah Lane, Roger Chang, Veronica Belmont and Patrick Norton Support the show at http://dailytechnewsshow.com/support/ Introduction: https://arstechnica.com/information-technology/2017/10/severe-flaw-in-wpa2-protocol-leaves-wi-fi-traffic-open-to-eavesdropping/ https://techcrunch.com/2017/10/16/apple-denied-motions-in-virnetx-patent-infringement-case-slapped-with-a-440m-final-judgement/ https://www.androidheadlines.com/2017/10/htc-holding-a-november-2-event-u11-plus-reportedly-coming.html Top Stories: https://www.theverge.com/circuitbreaker/2017/10/16/16481242/huawei-mate-10-pro-announcement-specs-price-ai-features http://fortune.com/2017/10/16/ibm-blockchain-stellar/ https://arstechnica.com/information-technology/2017/10/crypto-failure-cripples-millions-of-high-security-keys-750k-estonian-ids/ http://fortune.com/2017/10/16/microsoft-trump-administration-doj-supreme-court/ https://www.engadget.com/2017/10/16/artificial-pancreas-uses-your-phone-to-counter-diabetes/ http://dailytechheadlines.com http://anchor.fm Discussion Story: https://arstechnica.com/information-technology/2017/10/severe-flaw-in-wpa2-protocol-leaves-wi-fi-traffic-open-to-eavesdropping/ https://www.theverge.com/2017/10/16/16481136/wpa2-wi-fi-krack-vulnerability https://papers.mathyvanhoef.com/ccs2017.pdf https://www.theverge.com/2017/10/16/16481252/wi-fi-hack-attack-android-wpa-2-details http://fortune.com/2017/10/16/wifi-security-has-been-breached/ https://techcrunch.com/2017/10/16/wpa2-shown-to-be-vulnerable-to-key-reinstallation-attacks/?ncid=rss https://www.theverge.com/2017/10/16/16481818/wi-fi-attack-response-security-patches https://www.krackattacks.com https://arstechnica.com/information-technology/2017/10/how-the-krack-attack-destroys-nearly-all-wi-fi-security/ https://techcrunch.com/2017/10/16/heres-what-you-can-do-to-protect-yourself-from-the-krack-wifi-vulnerability/ News from you: http://dailytechnewsshow.reddit.com Pick of the day: http://www.dailytechnewsshow.com/picks Today’s guest: https://www.avexcel.com http://patreon.com/tekthing http://hak5.org @patricknorton https://irlpodcast.org http://www.growbot.io http://veronicabelmont.com http://botzine.org https://botwiki.org https://botmakers.org https://about.me/veronica http://swordandlaser.com @Veronica Next guest: http://www.patreon.com/ThePhileasClub http://frenchspin.com http://patreon.com/RDVtech @NotPatrick https://lenperaltastore.com/products/daily-tech-news-show-year-2-commemorative-poster-limited-edition-naming-rights http://dtns.bigcartel.com http://www.dailytechnewsshow.com/support http://www.technology.fm/dtns http://dtns.tv/wiki http://sarahlane.com https://twitter.com/sarahlane http://tommerrittbooks.com/blog/2016/4/9/pilot-x http://swordandlaser.com/store http://frogpants.com/currentgeek http://www.cordkillers.com http://www.damnfinepodcast.com
Views: 3543 Daily Tech News Show
New Directions in Cryptography - Papers We Love
 
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Speaker: Vishnu Prem "New Directions in Cryptography" also known as Diffie–Hellman–Merkle key exchange (https://www-ee.stanford.edu/~hellman/publications/24.pdf) Event Page: https://www.facebook.com/events/223807567956217/ Produced by Engineers.SG Help us caption & translate this video! http://amara.org/v/IHJf/
Views: 220 Engineers.SG
Cloning 3G/4G SIM Cards With A PC And An Oscilloscope: Lessons Learned In Physical Security
 
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by Yu Yu Recently, documents leaked from Edward Snowden alleged that NSA and GCHQ had stolen millions of SIM card encryption keys from one of the world's largest chip manufacturers. This incident draws the public attention to the longstanding concern for the mobile network security. Despite that various attacks against 2G (GSM) algorithms (COMP-128, A5) were found in literature, no practical attacks were known against 3G/4G (UMTS/LTE) SIM cards. 3G/4G SIM cards adopt a mutual authentication algorithm called MILENAGE, which is in turn based on AES-128, a mathematically secure block cipher standardized by NIST. In addition to the encryption key, MILENAGE also uses nearly a dozen of 128-bit secrets to further obfuscate the algorithm. In this presentation, we show how to amount differential power analysis that recovers encryption key and other secrets in a divide-and-conquer manner within a few (10 to 40) minutes, allowing for SIM cards cloning. Our experiments succeeded on eight 3G/4G SIM cards from a variety of operators and manufacturers. The measurement setup of our experiment mainly consists of an oscilloscope (for power acquisition), an MP300-SC2 protocol analyzer (for interception of the messages), a self-made SIM card reader, and a PC (for signal processing and cryptanalysis). We finish the presentation by showing what happens to a 3G/4G SIM card and its duplicate when receiving texts/calls at the same time.
Views: 21906 Black Hat
DEF CON 23 - Eijah - Crypto for Hackers
 
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Hacking is hard. It takes passion, dedication, and an unwavering attention to detail. Hacking requires a breadth of knowledge spread across many domains. We need to have experience with different platforms, operating systems, software packages, tools, programming languages, and technology trends. Being overly deficient in any one of these areas can add hours to our hack, or even worse, bring us total failure. And while all of these things are important for a well-rounded hacker, one of the key areas that is often overlooked is cryptography. In an era dominated by security breaches, an understanding of encryption and hashing algorithms provides a tremendous advantage. We can better hone our attack vectors, especially when looking for security holes. A few years ago I released the first Blu-Ray device key, AA856A1BA814AB99FFDEBA6AEFBE1C04, by exploiting a vulnerability in an implementation of the AACS protocol. As hacks go, it was a simple one. But it was the knowledge of crypto that made it all possible. This presentation is an overview of the most common crypto routines helpful to hackers. We'll review the strengths and weaknesses of each algorithm, which ones to embrace, and which ones to avoid. You'll get C++ code examples, high-level wrapper classes, and an open-source library that implements all the algorithms. We'll even talk about creative ways to merge algorithms to further increase entropy and key strength. If you've ever wanted to learn how crypto can give you an advantage as a hacker, then this talk is for you. With this information you'll be able to maximize your hacks and better protect your personal data. Speaker Bio: Eijah is the founder of demonsaw, a secure and anonymous content sharing platform, and a Senior Programmer at a world-renowned game development studio. He has over 15 years of software development and IT Security experience. His career has covered a broad range of Internet and mid-range technologies, core security, and system architecture. Eijah has been a faculty member at multiple colleges, has spoken about security and development at conferences, and holds a master’s degree in Computer Science. Eijah is an active member of the hacking community and is an avid proponent of Internet freedom.
Views: 47178 DEFCONConference
ICO Review: Sentinel Protocol (UPP)  - Security Intelligence Platform For Blockchain
 
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Sentinel Protocol aims to create a secure ecosystem for cryptocurrency by utilizing a collective intelligence system. Learn more: https://crushcrypto.com/sentinel-protocol-ico-review/ Project website: https://sentinelprotocol.io White paper: https://sentinelprotocol.io/Sentinel%20Protocol%20Whitepaper%20English.pdf Download the PDF version of the presentation: https://crushcrypto.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/04/CrushCrypto-ICO-Review-Sentinel-Protocol-UPP.pdf Download the free ICO Guide which contains 6 simple steps for analyzing any ICOs to find the winning projects: https://crushcrypto.com/youtube/ Note: This is not a paid review. We do not offer promotional or advertising services. Our content is based on our own research, analysis and personal opinion. _______________________________________ What does the company/project do? Sentinel Protocol aims to create a secure ecosystem for cryptocurrency by utilizing a collective intelligence system to perform threat analysis. Currently, the most popular type of hacking is phishing – users entering the wrong website or are approached by a fake admin and send the cryptocurrency to a scam address. Blockchain is a system that shares information transparently. Through careful analysis, it is possible to track down illegal use of cryptocurrencies. The flow of cryptocurrency transactions that has been hijacked by cybercrime is actually easily traceable. Eventually, in order to monetize the hijacked assets, hackers need to send such assets to exchanges. This applies even to coins with anonymity features, such as Monero, Dash, and Zcash. Sentinel Protocol has three security features: threat reputation database, machine learning engine integrated security wallet, and distributed malware analysis sandbox. _______________________________________ What are the tokens used for and how can token holders make money? UPP tokens are used as a currency for goods and services provided by Sentinel Protocol, including the advanced security features of the security wallet. It can also be used for detailed cyber forensic service, consultancy, vulnerability assessment, and/or other activities requiring The Sentinel Protocols’ help. To incentivize the early participants or early Sentinels, the initial inflation ratio will be set between 3 to 7% per year, decreasing gradually each year. Similarly, the rewards of UPP tokens for performing similar contributions will gradually reduce. 30% of UPP revenues will go towards community contributors. _______________________________________ Opportunities - Security is one of the most important issues concerning the growth of cryptocurrencies. There are countless scam attempts on Telegram, Twitter, Slack, and so on. If successful, the potential for the project can be huge. - Most people focus on how not to get scammed/hacked in the first place, whereas Sentinel Protocol focuses on tracing the transactions/wallets of hackers. There is no competing project that we know of, therefore the project has a first mover advantage. - The project plans to partner up with exchanges to prevent hackers converting their stolen coins back to fiat. This provides a clear go-to-market strategy for quick adoption of the project. _______________________________________ Concerns - The project relies on network effect to create a rich database of threats. The protocol’s usefulness is limited if not a lot of people report scam addresses/transactions. - Because the project requires manual and real-time verification of fraudulent addresses/transactions, we believe the system would be fairly labor intensive. _______________________________________ Disclaimer The information in this video is for educational purposes only and is not investment advice. Please do your own research before making any investment decisions. Cryptocurrency investments are volatile and high risk in nature. Don't invest more than what you can afford to lose. Crush Crypto makes no representations, warranties, or assurances as to the accuracy, currency or completeness of the content contained in this video or any sites linked to or from this video.
Views: 3735 Crush Crypto
How To Break XML Encryption - Automatically
 
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by Juraj Somorovsky In recent years, XML Encryption has become a target of several new attacks. These attacks belong to the family of adaptive chosen-ciphertext attacks, and allow an adversary to decrypt symmetric and asymmetric XML ciphertexts, without knowing the secret keys. In order to protect XML Encryption implementations, the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) published an updated version of the standard. Unfortunately, most of the current XML Encryption implementations do not support the newest XML Encryption specification and offer different XML Security configurations to protect confidentiality of the exchanged messages. Resulting from the attack complexity, evaluation of the security configuration correctness becomes tedious and error prone. Validation of the applied countermeasures can only be made with numerous XML messages provoking incorrect behavior by decrypting XML content. Up to now, this validation was only manually possible. In this talk, we give an overview on the analysis of chosen-ciphertext attacks on XML Encryption and design an algorithm to perform a vulnerability scan on arbitrary encrypted XML messages. The algorithm can automatically detect a vulnerability and exploit it to retrieve the plaintext of a message protected by XML Encryption. To assess practicability of our approach, we implemented an open source attack plugin for Web Service attacking tool called WS-Attacker. With the plugin, we discovered new vulnerabilities in four out of five analyzed Web Service implementations, including IBM Datapower or Apache CXF.
Views: 2530 Black Hat
The Bitcoin Revolution (Documentary) Hidden Secrets Of Money Episode 8
 
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Bonus Features: http://www.hiddensecretsofmoney.com Today, mankind stands at a crossroads, and the path that humanity chooses may have a greater impact on our freedom and prosperity than any event in history. In 2008 a new technology was introduced that is so important that its destiny, and the destiny of mankind are inextricably linked. It is so powerful that if captured and controlled, it could enslave all of humanity. But if allowed to remain free and flourish - it could foster unimaginable levels of peace and prosperity. It has the power to replace all financial systems globally, to supplant ninety percent of Wall St, and to provide some functions of government. It has no agenda. It's always fair and impartial. It can not be manipulated, subverted, corrupted or cheated. And - it inverts the power structure and places control of one's destiny in the hands of the individual. In the future, when we look back at the 2.6 million-year timeline of human development and the major turning points that led to modern civilization - the creation of farming, the domestication of animals, the invention of the wheel, the harnessing of electricity and the splitting of the atom - the sixty year development of computers, the internet and this new technology will be looked upon as a single event...a turning point that will change the course of human history. It's called Full Consensus Distibuted Ledger Technology, and so far its major use has been for cryptocurrencies such as Bitcoin....but its potential goes far, far beyond that. The Crypto Revolution: From Bitcoin to Hashgraph is our latest episode of Hidden Secrets of Money. It’s about the evolution of cryptocurrencies and full consensus distributed ledger technology, and how they will change our world. I believe that this video is by far the easiest way for the average person to gain an understanding of what cryptocurrencies are and how they work, but more importantly, the immense power of full consensus distributed ledger technology and the impact it will have on our daily lives. I have an absolute passion for monetary history and economics, and I love teaching them. Cryptocurrencies are our future, and there is no escaping it… this is the way everything will be done from now on. But, we now stand at a crucial turning point in history. Full consensus ledgers such as Blockchain and Hashgraph have the power to enslave us, or free us… it all depends on how we choose to use them. If we choose to support centralized versions issued by governments and the financial sector we will be granting them more control over our daily lives. Politicians and bureaucrats will be able raise taxes instantly, whenever they want, on every dollar you make as you make them, and every dollar you spend as you spend them. If they think the economy needs stimulating they'll be able to enforce huge negative interest rates, effectively punishing you for not spending everything you earn before you earn it. They'll be able to decide where you can go and where you can’t, what you can buy and what you can’t, and what you can do and whatever they decide you can’t do… and if they don't like you, they can just disconnect you from the monetary system. So, will the monetary system become fully distributed and help to free mankind, or will it be centralized and enslave us? The choice is in front of us right now, and our decisions will create our future. I believe that this will be a binary outcome, there is no middle ground, it will either be one future or the other. The question is, will it be the future we want? Or the future they want? I’m a precious metals dealer and one thing I’ve learned is that gold, silver, and now free market decentralized cryptocurrencies, represent freedom. Because of this knowledge I started investing in crypto currencies long ago and also became one of the first precious metals dealers to accept bitcoin as payment for gold and silver. I would really appreciate it if you could share this video with everyone you know. I think it’s very important that as many people as possible find out about the changes to the global monetary system that are happening right now… nothing will affect us more, and everyone’s future depends on it. Thanks, Mike If you enjoyed watching this video, be sure to pick up a free copy of Mike's bestselling book, Guide to Investing in Gold & Silver: https://goldsilver.com/buy-online/investing-in-gold-and-silver/ (Want to contribute closed captions in your language for our videos? Visit this link: http://www.youtube.com/timedtext_cs_panel?tab=2&c=UCThv5tYUVaG4ZPA3p6EXZbQ)
Why cryptography and information Security course
 
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www.hiteshChoudhary.com www.newdemy.com Cryptography What is cryptography? Cryptography (or cryptology; from Greek κρυπτός, "hidden, secret"; and γράφειν, graphein, "writing", or -λογία, -logia, "study", respectively) is the practice and study of techniques for secure communication in the presence of third parties (called adversaries).More generally, it is about constructing and analyzing protocols that overcome the influence of adversaries and which are related to various aspects in information security such as data confidentiality, data integrity, authentication, and non-repudiation. Modern cryptography intersects the disciplines of mathematics, computer science, and electrical engineering. Applications of cryptography include ATM cards, computer passwords, and electronic commerce. Yeah, I know that you have read the above lines many times. These are perfectly true jargons. It’s just something like our brain is made of 80% of water, technically true but it doesn’t explain things much. When I tried to study Cryptography, it was tough. When anyone wants to learn HTML, he can find a lots of resources on internet but when things come to Cryptography you need to buy a lots of books and watch a lots of youtube videos which contains an annoying background music. A lots of blog are also helpful but all are fragmented. So, I decided that it is a good time to put Cryptography course. The course will be beginners friendly and will teach you a lot of things about Information Security. This series is not meant for 2 communities of people over the internet. 1. Not bothered about Computer Security 2. True Computer professional [Advanced programmers and crypto masters] The category one does not fit into any computer security course as information security comes at very last in their priority list. Hence, most of the time they are the practice playgrounds for most of the hackers. The category two has moved into the immense knowledge of information security. And they know all the stuff or most of the present stuff about it. So, they will feel bore in this series because they are the inventor of most of the stuff. Rest of the people are going to love this cryptography online video series. The candidates for which I am looking to take this cryptography course are: 1. University Students 2. Hackers a. Fretos : The freshers b. Practos: The practical ones University Students will be interested in this course as most of the Universities have curriculum of Cryptography. The second category is of hackers but I have divided them into 2 major categories. First one is Fretos, these are fresher in information security and are trying to learn stuff. It is a good time for them to start this series because you will understand terms like MITM, RSA, MD5 and DSA. Second category is hackers who have learned most of the things practically. Personally, I am very impressed that you have gained so much of knowledge. You might have knowledge about hacking into various accounts and systems or even knowledge of creating exploits. But ask a simple question to yourself, you are a pro in hacking skills but have no idea about RSA or Block ciphers. You know to break WEP in wireless but no idea of WEP encryption or cryptic flaw in algorithm. I hope that you have got my point. So, let’s get started.
Views: 2857 Hitesh Choudhary
Blackhat 2012 EUROPE  - The Heavy Metal That Poisoned the Droid
 
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This video is part of the Infosec Video Collection at SecurityTube.net: http://www.securitytube.net Blackhat 2012 EUROPE - The Heavy Metal That Poisoned the Droid https://media.blackhat.com/bh-eu-12/Erasmus/bh-eu-12-Erasmus-Heavy-Metal_Poisoned_Droid-WP.pdf https://media.blackhat.com/bh-eu-12/Erasmus/bh-eu-12-Erasmus-Heavy-Metal_Poisoned_Droid-Slides.pdf The widely publicised malware on the Android Marketplace relies on the fact that users do not review permissions when installing applications. A lesser known fact is that an installed application with no special permissions will often be able to access a user's most sensitive data regardless. Upon reviewing multiple Android handsets and applications, the sheer number of information disclosure vulnerabilities found was alarming. A live demonstration will be conducted on well-known Android phones, showing how a person's most sensitive data can be compromised by an attacker. After discovering many vulnerabilities in Android applications that allows information to be leaked and privileges to be escalated, it was clear that there was a need for a tool that allows security specialists to view the attack surface of applications from an unprivileged context and interact with them in an intuitive manner. Mercury is a tool that allows its user to dynamically examine the attack surface of applications that reside on a device and exploit them. It is split into two parts, using a client/server model in order to meet its goals. The design of the system works by placing a low-privileged server application that is deployed on the Android device which interacts with a command-line interface on the user's computer. This model provides users with a rich experience that will not disappoint. This class of tool is very different from source code analysis is as it is aimed to be a practical interactive platform for Android bug hunters. The main objective of Mercury is to be an auditing tool that can be used for many purposes. Some features which make this possible are the following: The ease with which a user can find relevant information about exposed application attack vectors Command-line interaction with applications on the device in order to find vulnerabilities The ability to write proof-of-concept exploits for vulnerabilities using a range of pre-defined commands. This effectively removes the need for custom application writing in order to perform tests against the target vulnerability. MWR Labs research that allows the exploitation of debuggable applications, SQL injection on content providers and various other privilege escalation techniques The exploitation wing of Mercury is currently under heavy development, finding innovative ways of escalating privileges from an unprivileged context. It is the hope that this tool will be released to the public as part of Tyrone's talk at BlackHat EU 2012. This talk would present multiple vulnerabilities found in Android handsets and techniques for exploiting different applications using Mercury.
Views: 2980 SecurityTubeCons
Nano | $NANO | In Block Lattice We Trust!
 
09:00
Nano is a third generation, trustless, low-latency cryptocurrency that utilizes a block-lattice architecture instead of your traditional blockchain that you see with other cryptocurrencies. Nano’s focus is for fast, fee-less, peer to peer transactions and that is what separates it the most from it’s similar competitor IOTA. Links: https://nano.org/en https://twitter.com/nanocurrency https://www.reddit.com/r/nanocurrency/ https://raiblocks.net/page/representatives.php Sources: https://github.com/clemahieu/raiblocks/wiki/Distribution,-Mining-and-Units https://raiblocks.net/media/RaiBlocks_FAQ.pdf https://coincentral.com/raiblocks-beginners-guide/ https://www.mycryptopedia.com/raiblocks-explained/ https://raiblocks.net/media/RaiBlocks_Whitepaper__English.pdf https://hackernoon.com/iota-vs-raiblocks-413679bb4c3e $NANO/$XRB: xrb_1hhxprummog35d45rb4sdc9rw9gm1bp3w9y5hbhzydx9jhgfedn9jqdqkokh EDIT: I would like to mention I am aware I stated the circulating supply incorrectly as the market cap, I apologize for the mistake! Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/cryptocandor ******************************************************************** Join my discord!: https://discord.gg/CpQy99C ******************************************************************** Follow me: My other vlog: https://www.youtube.com/awproductions Twitter: https://twitter.com/cryptocandor Steemit: https://steemit.com/@brandneweyes Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/cryptocandor/ Cryptex Discord: https://discordapp.com/invite/GyPcXQd Website: https://www.cryptocandor.com ******************************************************************** If you're feeling generous- Tip Jars: ETH: 0x3b97C664a9DAf6c79d6d577E0048a412BaAe68dE BTC: 1K2Qjrf5KUxMpLqfmXLWJxwBnPzayoiGGL Bitcoincash: 1ECdtoqg3RcWkt4JY9bb1BrvBpLsm7h3ho LTC: LhimSAApQPY68EzXzLU1YVw4hndLfjEcXw VTC: Vdd9P644T3eLrkwKWy5eTTXTCEipiot7Y4 LSK: 1894536853028791512L PIVX: DFWUCjXZcedi6Upbf1u4BW753nj2aU5eAG BLOCK: BoCdcCLtyzxQ5ggMq3nD8j6wZ8XsYKUjyD DASH: Xx8CXP1kX3kafwyEZmismSm1UFmAQdHYuz ADA: DdzFFzCqrhtCK3FGLqHmUpuyQaUk4pADjHJyMxg3CnM7LQiKaTsqTvBa4haDJ8Rvw68SFUjKyWKy1f9XJhihXKeVonksR6qvCRSJe3vo My cold wallet: https://www.ledgerwallet.com/r/1f08 Sign up with Coinbase: https://www.coinbase.com/join/588e722eee8dc54497106433 ******************************************************************** DISCLAIMER: The information provided is not to be considered as a recommendation to buy or invest in certain assets or currencies and is provided solely as an educational and information resource to help traders make their own decisions. Past performance is no guarantee of future success. It is important to note that no system or methodology has ever been developed that can guarantee profits or ensure freedom from losses. No representation or implication is being made that using the attached material will guarantee profits or ensures freedom from losses. CryptoCandor shall not be liable to the participant for any damages, claims, expenses or losses of any kind (whether direct or indirect) suffered by the participant arising from or in connection with the information obtained this website or directly from the website owner. Help us caption & translate this video! https://amara.org/v/eS9O/
Views: 13874 CryptoCandor
NDSS 2018 OBLIVIATE: A Data Oblivious Filesystem for Intel SGX
 
17:58
NDSS 2018 Session 6A: Cloud 02 OBLIVIATE: A Data Oblivious Filesystem for Intel SGX SUMMARY Intel SGX provides con dentiality and integrity of a program running within the con nes of an enclave, and is expected to enable valuable security applications such as private information retrieval. This paper is concerned with the security aspects of SGX in accessing a key system resource, les. Through concrete attack scenarios, we show that all existing SGX lesystems are vulnerable to either system call snooping, page fault, or cache based side-channel attacks. To address this security limitations in current SGX lesystems, we present OBLIVIATE, a data oblivious lesystem for Intel SGX. The key idea behind OBLIVIATE is in adapting the ORAM protocol to read and write data from a le within an SGX enclave. OBLIVIATE redesigns the conceptual components of ORAM for SGX environments, and it seamlessly supports an SGX program without requiring any changes in the application layer. OBLIVIATE also employs SGX-speci c defenses and optimizations in order to ensure complete security with acceptable overhead. The evaluation of the prototype of OBLIVIATE demonstrated its practical effectiveness in running popular server applications such as SQLite and Lighttpd, while also achieving a throughput improvement of 2×- 8× over a baseline ORAM-based solution, and less than 2× overhead over an in-memory SGX lesystem. SLIDES http://wp.internetsociety.org/ndss/wp-content/uploads/sites/25/2018/03/ndss2018_06A-2_Ahmad_Slides.pdf PAPER http://wp.internetsociety.org/ndss/wp-content/uploads/sites/25/2018/02/ndss2018_06A-2_Ahmad_paper.pdf AUTHORS Adil Ahmad (Purdue University) Kyungtae Kim (Purdue University) Muhammad Ihsanulhaq Sarfaraz (Purdue University) Byoungyoung Lee (Purdue University) Network and Distributed System Security (NDSS) Symposium 2018, 18-21 February 2018, Catamaran Resort Hotel & Spa in San Diego, California. https://www.ndss-symposium.org/ndss2018/programme/ ABOUT NDSS The Network and Distributed System Security Symposium (NDSS) fosters information exchange among researchers and practitioners of network and distributed system security. The target audience includes those interested in practical aspects of network and distributed system security, with a focus on actual system design and implementation. A major goal is to encourage and enable the Internet community to apply, deploy, and advance the state of available security technologies. https://www.ndss-symposium.org/ #NDSS #NDSS18 #NDSS2018 #InternetSecurity
Views: 80 NDSS Symposium
EB116 – Eli Ben-Sasson: Zero Knowledge Proofs
 
01:08:06
Support the show, consider donating: 1HegW9VsiMn9BUWdcV6kNS1eTAWjKPKtYe (http://bit.ly/1SWCP5T) Zero Knowledge Proofs are methods of providing cryptographic proofs to another party while keeping some information secret. The simple concept of ZKP offer tantalizing possibilities: Banks could prove solvency without revealing depositors. Governments could prove the fairness of an election without compromising privacy. Computer science professor Eli Ben-Sasson joined us to discuss where blockchains and cryptocurrencies intersect with Zero Knowledge Proofs and related technologies such as zkSNARKs. It offered a fascinating view into what will surely become a core part of blockchain tech in the future. Topics covered included: - What are proof systems? - Zero Knowledge Proofs (ZKP) and other terminology such as SNARKs and zkSNARKs - The mechanics of Zero Knowledge Proofs - The role of performance in Zero Knowledge Proofs - Applications of ZKPs - The widespread potential impact of ZKP to verify processes Links mentioned in this episode: - Eli Ben-Sasson's Website http://bit.ly/1PbbK9O - SNARKs for C talk by Madars Virza http://bit.ly/1PQFoah - Stackexchange: What are SNARKs http://bit.ly/1UEcqbq - SNARKs for C paper [PDF] http://bit.ly/20Cse26 - Zerocash Talk http://bit.ly/1Puy2He Sponsors: - Hide.me: Protect your privacy and personal data with a free VPN account at Hide.me/epicenter Show notes: http://epicenterbitcoin.com/podcast/116 SoundCloud: http://soundcloud.com/epicenterbitcoin/eb-116 Epicenter Bitcoin is hosted by Brian Fabian Crain, Sébastien Couture & Meher Roy. - Visit our website: http://epicenterbitcoin.com - Subscribe to our newsletter: http://epicenterbitcoin.com/newsletter - Twitter: http://twitter.com/epicenterbtc
Views: 5751 Epicenter
Lecture -3 TCP/IP - Part-1
 
59:59
Lecture Series on Internet Technologies by Prof.I.Sengupta, Department of Computer Science & Engineering ,IIT Kharagpur. For more details on NPTEL visit http://nptel.iitm.ac.in
Views: 286646 nptelhrd
Cryptographic Hash Functions
 
49:38
Cryptography and Network Security by Prof. D. Mukhopadhyay, Department of Computer Science and Engineering, IIT Kharagpur. For more details on NPTEL visit http://nptel.iitm.ac.in
Views: 11943 nptelhrd
CompTIA A+ PracticeTest 220-901.   1198 questions.  Exam Simulator. Free
 
04:48
If you are not prepared for COMPTIA certification 220-901 exam questions and want to get some help so, now you do not need to take tension. You can pass CompTIA A+ certification exam very simply and easily with our free 220-901 dumps. =================================================== ► BlueStacks Download Link: https://www.bluestacks.com/download.h... ► A+VCE Player 5.7.4 Cracked Download link: https://drive.google.com/file/d/1BL4drGfc8AzAEYuhKuoK-S9qRRH7fnHx/view?usp=sharing ► EXAM TEST CompTIA A+ http://gratisexam.com/ ====================================================== ► How to install BlueStacks: https://youtu.be/NXO5vPj515Y ====================================================== CompTIA. BrainDumps. CompTIA A+ Certification Exam CompTIA A+ Practical Application CompTIA A+ Essentials A+ Depot Technician Designation A+ Remote Support Technician Designation How To Open VCE Files Online - Best VCE File Viewer or Opener How to install BlueStacks How to open VCE file in bluestack and android device NEW QUESTION 1 Which of the following BEST describes the offensive participants in a tabletop exercise? A. Red team B. Blue team C. System administrators D. Security analysts E. Operations team Answer: A NEW QUESTION 2 After analyzing and correlating activity from multiple sensors, the security analyst has determined a group from a high-risk country is responsible for a sophisticated breach of the company network and continuous administration of targeted attacks for the past three months. Until now, the attacks went unnoticed. This is an example of ____. A. privilege escalation B. advanced persistent threat C. malicious insider threat D. spear phishing Answer: B NEW QUESTION 3 A system administrator who was using an account with elevated privileges deleted a large amount of log files generated by a virtual hypervisor in order to free up disk space. These log files are needed by the security team to analyze the health of the virtual machines. Which of the following compensating controls would help prevent this from reoccurring? (Select two.) A. Succession planning B. Separation of duties C. Mandatory vacation D. Personnel training E. Job rotation Answer: BD NEW QUESTION 4 A security analyst received a compromised workstation. The workstation's hard drive may contain evidence of criminal activities. Which of the following is the FIRST thing the analyst must do to ensure the integrity of the hard drive while performing the analysis? A. Make a copy of the hard drive. B. Use write blockers. C. Runrm -Rcommand to create a hash. D. Install it on a different machine and explore the content. Answer: B NEW QUESTION 5 File integrity monitoring states the following files have been changed without a written request or approved change. The following change has been made: chmod 777 -Rv /usr Which of the following may be occurring? A. The ownership pf /usr has been changed to the current user. B. Administrative functions have been locked from users. C. Administrative commands have been made world readable/writable. D. The ownership of/usr has been changed to the root user. Answer: C NEW QUESTION 6 A security analyst has created an image of a drive from an incident. Which of the following describes what the analyst should do NEXT? A. The analyst should create a backup of the drive and then hash the drive. B. The analyst should begin analyzing the image and begin to report findings. C. The analyst should create a hash of the image and compare it to the original drive's hash. D. The analyst should create a chain of custody document and notify stakeholders. Answer: C NEW QUESTION 7 An organization is requesting the development of a disaster recovery plan. The organization has grown and so has its infrastructure. Documentation, policies, and procedures do not exist. Which of the following steps should be taken to assist in the development of the disaster recovery plan? A. Conduct a risk assessment. B. Develop a data retention policy. C. Execute vulnerability scanning. D. Identify assets. Answer: D NEW QUESTION 8 ...... NEW QUESTION 9 An analyst was tasked with providing recommendations of technologies that are PKI X.509 compliant for a variety of secure functions. Which of the following technologies meet the compatibility requirement? (Select three.) A. 3DES B. AES C. IDEA D. PKCS E. PGP F. SSL/TLS G. TEMPEST Answer: BDF NEW QUESTION 10 After completing a vulnerability scan, the following output was noted: CVE-2011-3389 QID 42366 – SSLv3.0 / TLSv1.0 Protocol weak CBC mode Server side vulnerability Check with: openssl s_client -connect qualys.jive.mobile.com:443 – tlsl -cipher “AES:CAMELLIA:SEED:3DES:DES” Which of the following vulnerabilities has been identified? A. PKI transfer vulnerability. B. Active Directory encryption vulnerability. C. Web application cryptography vulnerability. D. VPN tunnel vulnerability. Answer: A
What is SUPPLEMENTAL ACCESS CONTROL? What does SUPPLEMENTAL ACCESS CONTROL mean?
 
03:12
What is SUPPLEMENTAL ACCESS CONTROL? What does SUPPLEMENTAL ACCESS CONTROL mean? SUPPLEMENTAL ACCESS CONTROL meaning - SUPPLEMENTAL ACCESS CONTROL definition - SUPPLEMENTAL ACCESS CONTROL explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6UuCPh7GrXznZi0Hz2YQnQ Supplemental Access Control (SAC) is a set of security features defined by ICAO for protecting data contained in electronic travel documents (e.g. electronic passports). SAC specifies the Password Authenticated Connection Establishment (PACE) protocol, which supplements and improves ICAO's Basic Access Control (BAC). PACE, like BAC, prevents two types of attacks: Skimming (online attack that consists in reading the RFID chip without physical access to the document and without the holder's approval). Prior to reading the chip, the inspection system needs to know some data that is printed on the document (e.g. the MRZ) or a key that is known only to the holder (personal identification number (PIN)), which means he has willingly handed the document for inspection. While BAC works only with the MRZ, PACE allows using card access numbers (short keys printed on the document) and PINs. Eavesdropping (offline attack that starts by recording the data exchanged between the reader and the chip, to be analyzed later). The inspection system uses PACE for establishing a secure communication channel with the contactless chip, but using stronger cryptography than BAC. PACE offers an excellent protection against offline attacks, raising the security of documents containing contactless chips to the level of documents using contact chips. With the implementation of PACE begins the third generation of electronic passports. EU members must implement PACE in electronic passports by the end of 2014. States, for the sake of global interoperability, must not implement PACE without implementing BAC, and inspection systems should implement PACE and use it if supported by the MRTD chip. Thus, it is important that global interoperability is achieved, to make the enhancement reliable for the document verification process. To achieve interoperability, there are so called Interoperability Tests. The results of the last test focusing on SAC describe the current state of implementation in the field. Version 1.1 (April 2014) of ICAO's "Supplemental Access Control" Technical Report introduces the Chip Authentication protocol as an alternative to Active Authentication and integrates it with PACE, achieving a new protocol (Chip Authentication Mapping, PACE-CAM ) which allows faster execution than the separate protocols.
Views: 32 The Audiopedia
27c3: Chip and PIN is Broken (en)
 
57:43
Speaker: Steven J. Murdoch Vulnerabilities in the EMV Protocol EMV is the dominant protocol used for smart card payments worldwide, with over 730 million cards in circulation. Known to bank customers as "Chip and PIN", it is used in Europe; it is being introduced in Canada; and there is pressure from banks to introduce it in the USA too. EMV secures credit and debit card transactions by authenticating both the card and the customer presenting it through a combination of cryptographic authentication codes, digital signatures, and the entry of a PIN. In this paper we describe and demonstrate a protocol flaw which allows criminals to use a genuine card to make a payment without knowing the card's PIN, and to remain undetected even when the merchant has an online connection to the banking network. The fraudster performs a man-in-the-middle attack to trick the terminal into believing the PIN verified correctly, while telling the issuing bank that no PIN was entered at all. The paper considers how the flaws arose, why they remained unknown despite EMV's wide deployment for the best part of a decade, and how they might be fixed. Because we have found and validated a practical attack against the core functionality of EMV, we conclude that the protocol is broken. This failure is significant in the field of protocol design, and also has important public policy implications, in light of growing reports of fraud on stolen EMV cards. Frequently, banks deny such fraud victims a refund, asserting that a card cannot be used without the correct PIN, and concluding that the customer must be grossly negligent or lying. Our attack can explain a number of these cases, and exposes the need for further research to bridge the gap between the theoretical and practical security of bank payment systems. Smart cards have gradually replaced magnetic strip cards for point-of-sale and ATM transactions in many countries. The leading system, EMV (named after Europay, MasterCard, and Visa), has been deployed throughout most of Europe, and is currently being rolled out in Canada. As of early 2008, there were over 730 million EMV compliant smart cards in circulation worldwide. In EMV, customers authorize a credit or debit card transaction by inserting their card and entering a PIN into a point-of-sale terminal; the PIN is typically verified by the smart card chip, which is in turn authenticated to the terminal by a digital certificate. The transaction details are also authenticated by a cryptographic message authentication code (MAC), using a symmetric key shared between the payment card and the bank that issued the card to the customer (the issuer). EMV was heavily promoted under the "Chip and PIN" brand during its national rollout in the UK. The technology was advertised as a solution to increasing card fraud: a chip to prevent card counterfeiting, and a PIN to prevent abuse of stolen cards. Since its introduction in the UK the fraud landscape has changed significantly: lost and stolen card fraud is down, and counterfeit card fraud experienced a two year lull. But no type of fraud has been eliminated, and the overall fraud levels have actually risen (see Figure 1). The likely explanation for this is that EMV has simply moved fraud, not eliminated it. One goal of EMV was to externalise the costs of dispute from the issuing bank, in that if a disputed transaction has been authorised by a manuscript signature, it would be charged to the merchant, while if it had been authorised by a PIN then it would be charged to the customer. The net effect is that the banking industry, which was responsible for the design of the system, carries less liability for the fraud. The industry describes this as a 'liability shift'. In the past few years, the UK media have reported numerous cases where cardholders' complaints have been rejected by their bank and by government-approved mediators such as the Financial Ombudsman Service, using stock excuses such as 'Your card was CHIP read and a PIN was used so you must have been negligent.' Interestingly, an increasing number of complaints from believable witnesses indicate that their EMV cards were fraudulently used shortly after being stolen, despite there having been no possibility that the thief could have learned the PIN. In this paper, we describe a potential explanation. We have demonstrated how criminals can use stolen "Chip and PIN" (EMV) smart cards without knowing the PIN. Since "verified by PIN" -- the essence of the system -- does not work, we declare the Chip and PIN system to be broken. For more information visit:http://bit.ly/27c3_information To download the video visit: http://bit.ly/27c3_videos
Views: 16431 Christiaan008
Malware Analysis   FBI Ransomware
 
06:03
You can find a full write-up and sample download here: http://www.ringzerolabs.com/2017/08/fbi-ransomware.html Ring Ø Labs Analysis Environment Setup: https://www.youtube.com/edit?o=U&video_id=Onqql1Zz3OE Ring Ø Labs is a Reverse Engineering site dedicated to analyzing malware, researching emergent security topics, and hacking the planet. www.RingZeroLabs.com Here are some approaches in reverse engineering a malware sample: Reverse engineer: The most obvious approach is to completely reverse engineer a piece of malware. This obviously takes a great amount of time, so other approaches are more practical. Exploitation techniques: Another approach you can take is to focus on the exploitation techniques of a piece of malware. Occasionally you will see a piece of malware that is using a new exploitation technique, or is exploiting a zero-day vulnerability. In this case you may be interested only in the specific exploitation technique so you can timebox your analysis and only look at the exploitation mechanisms. Obfuscation: Malware will often obfuscate itself and make itself difficult to analyze. You might come across malware that you have seen before without obfuscation. In that case you may only want to focus on reverse engineering the new parts. Encryption methods: A common type of malware these days is ransomware. Ransomware essentially encrypts the victim's files and locks them up so that they can't be accessed or read. Oftentimes the authors of ransomware will make mistakes when they implement the encryption mechanisms. So if you focus your research on the encryption mechanisms you might be able to find weaknesses in their implementation and/or you might be able to find hard-coded keys or weak algorithms. C&C communication: This is something that is pretty commonly done when looking at malware. Analysts often want to figure out what the communication protocol is between a piece of malware on the client's side and the server on the command and control side. The communication protocol can actually give you a lot of hints about the malware’s capabilities. Attribution: Murky area - kind of like a dark art. It usually involves a lot of guesswork, knowledge of malicious hacking teams and looking at more than one piece of malware. Categorization and clustering: You can reverse engineer malware from a broader point of view. This involves looking at malware in bulk and doing a broad-stroke analysis on lots of different malware, rather than doing a deep dive. Techniques Now, let’s look at techniques that can be utilized while analyzing malware. First of all, we use static analysis. This is the process of analyzing malware or binaries without actually running them. It can be as simple as looking at metadata from a file. It can range from doing disassembly or decompilation of malware code to symbolic execution, which is something like virtual execution of a binary without actually executing it in a real environment. Conversely, dynamic analysis is the process of analyzing a piece of malware when you are running it in a live environment. In this case, you are often looking at the behavior of the malware and looking at the side effects of what it is doing. You are running tools like process monitor and sysmon to see what kinds of artifacts a piece of malware produces after it is run. We also use automated analysis. Oftentimes if you are looking at malware you want to automate things just to speed up the process to save time. However, use caution, as with automated analysis sometimes things get missed because you are trying to do things generically. If a piece of malware contains things like anti-debugging routines or anti-analysis mechanisms, you may want to perform a manual analysis. You need to pick the right tools for the job. DISCLAIMER: Our videos are strictly for documentary, educational, and entertainment purposes only. Imitation or the use of any acts depicted in these videos is solely AT YOUR OWN RISK. We (including YouTube) will not be held liable for any injury to yourself or damage to others resulting from attempting anything shown in any our videos. We do not endorse any specific product and this video is not an attempt to sell you a good or service. These videos are free to watch and if anyone attempts to charge for this video notify us immediately. By viewing or flagging this video you are acknowledging the above.
Views: 470 H4rM0n1cH4cK
27C3 Chip and PIN is Broken - Steven J. Murdoch (3/4)
 
15:00
Chip and PIN is Broken Vulnerabilities in the EMV Protocol EMV is the dominant protocol used for smart card payments worldwide, with over 730 million cards in circulation. Known to bank customers as "Chip and PIN", it is used in Europe; it is being introduced in Canada; and there is pressure from banks to introduce it in the USA too. EMV secures credit and debit card transactions by authenticating both the card and the customer presenting it through a combination of cryptographic authentication codes, digital signatures, and the entry of a PIN. In this paper we describe and demonstrate a protocol flaw which allows criminals to use a genuine card to make a payment without knowing the card's PIN, and to remain undetected even when the merchant has an online connection to the banking network. The fraudster performs a man-in-the-middle attack to trick the terminal into believing the PIN verified correctly, while telling the issuing bank that no PIN was entered at all. The paper considers how the flaws arose, why they remained unknown despite EMV's wide deployment for the best part of a decade, and how they might be fixed. Because we have found and validated a practical attack against the core functionality of EMV, we conclude that the protocol is broken. This failure is significant in the field of protocol design, and also has important public policy implications, in light of growing reports of fraud on stolen EMV cards. Frequently, banks deny such fraud victims a refund, asserting that a card cannot be used without the correct PIN, and concluding that the customer must be grossly negligent or lying. Our attack can explain a number of these cases, and exposes the need for further research to bridge the gap between the theoretical and practical security of bank payment systems. 27C3 Chip and PIN is Broken - Steven J. Murdoch (3/4) |Uploaded with TubeShack http://www.shacksoftware.com
Views: 473 HackingCons
Malware Analysis - Malicious Office Document Metadata
 
08:06
Ring Ø Labs -------------------- WEBSITE: https://RingZeroLabs.com MALWARE ANALYSIS LAB SETUP: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLrJFR89Z-9SBDMiCtDT2_4SJxkFpc-k7P REDDIT: https://www.reddit.com/r/RingZero/ TWITTER: https://twitter.com/RingZeroLabs FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/Ring-Zero-Labs-110227123029488 GOOGLE+: https://plus.google.com/b/117437081620745642342/117437081620745642342 Ring Ø Labs is a Reverse Engineering site dedicated to analyzing malware, researching emergent security topics, and hacking the planet :) Here are some approaches in reverse engineering a malware sample: Reverse engineer: The most obvious approach is to completely reverse engineer a piece of malware. This obviously takes a great amount of time, so other approaches are more practical. Exploitation techniques: Another approach you can take is to focus on the exploitation techniques of a piece of malware. Occasionally you will see a piece of malware that is using a new exploitation technique, or is exploiting a zero-day vulnerability. In this case you may be interested only in the specific exploitation technique so you can timebox your analysis and only look at the exploitation mechanisms. Obfuscation: Malware will often obfuscate itself and make itself difficult to analyze. You might come across malware that you have seen before without obfuscation. In that case you may only want to focus on reverse engineering the new parts. Encryption methods: A common type of malware these days is ransomware. Ransomware essentially encrypts the victim's files and locks them up so that they can't be accessed or read. Oftentimes the authors of ransomware will make mistakes when they implement the encryption mechanisms. So if you focus your research on the encryption mechanisms you might be able to find weaknesses in their implementation and/or you might be able to find hard-coded keys or weak algorithms. C&C communication: This is something that is pretty commonly done when looking at malware. Analysts often want to figure out what the communication protocol is between a piece of malware on the client's side and the server on the command and control side. The communication protocol can actually give you a lot of hints about the malware’s capabilities. Attribution: Murky area - kind of like a dark art. It usually involves a lot of guesswork, knowledge of malicious hacking teams and looking at more than one piece of malware. Categorization and clustering: You can reverse engineer malware from a broader point of view. This involves looking at malware in bulk and doing a broad-stroke analysis on lots of different malware, rather than doing a deep dive. Techniques Now, let’s look at techniques that can be utilized while analyzing malware. First of all, we use static analysis. This is the process of analyzing malware or binaries without actually running them. It can be as simple as looking at metadata from a file. It can range from doing disassembly or decompilation of malware code to symbolic execution, which is something like virtual execution of a binary without actually executing it in a real environment. Conversely, dynamic analysis is the process of analyzing a piece of malware when you are running it in a live environment. In this case, you are often looking at the behavior of the malware and looking at the side effects of what it is doing. You are running tools like process monitor and sysmon to see what kinds of artifacts a piece of malware produces after it is run. We also use automated analysis. Oftentimes if you are looking at malware you want to automate things just to speed up the process to save time. However, use caution, as with automated analysis sometimes things get missed because you are trying to do things generically. If a piece of malware contains things like anti-debugging routines or anti-analysis mechanisms, you may want to perform a manual analysis. You need to pick the right tools for the job. DISCLAIMER: Our videos are strictly for documentary, educational, and entertainment purposes only. Imitation or the use of any acts depicted in these videos is solely AT YOUR OWN RISK. We (including YouTube) will not be held liable for any injury to yourself or damage to others resulting from attempting anything shown in any our videos. We do not endorse any specific product and this video is not an attempt to sell you a good or service. These videos are free to watch and if anyone attempts to charge for this video notify us immediately. By viewing or flagging this video you are acknowledging the above.
Views: 379 H4rM0n1cH4cK
Crypto Defenses for Real-World System Threats - Kenn White - Ann Arbor
 
01:36:58
Modern encryption techniques provide several important security properties, well known to most practitioners. Or are they? What are in fact the guarantees of, say, HTTPS TLS cipher suites using authenticated encryption, IPSec vs. SSL VPNs, Property Preserving Encryption, or token vaults? We live in an era of embedded Hardware Security Modules that cost less than $1 in volume, and countless options now exist for encrypting streaming network data, files, volumes, and even entire databases. Let's take a deep dive into the edge of developed practice to discuss real-world threat scenarios to public cloud and IoT data, and look closely at how we can address specific technical risks with our current encryption toolkits. Advanced math not required. Bio: Kenneth White is a security researcher whose work focuses on networks and global systems. He is co-director of the Open Crypto Audit Project (OCAP), currently managing a large-scale audit of OpenSSL on behalf of the Linux Foundation's Core Infrastructure Initiative. Previously, White was Principal Scientist at Washington DC-based Social & Scientific Systems where he led the engineering team that designed and ran global operations and security for the largest clinical trial network in the world, with research centers in over 100 countries. White co-founded CBX Group which provides security services to major organizations including World Health, UNICEF, Doctors without Borders, the US State Department, and BAO Systems. Together with Matthew Green, White co-founded the TrueCrypt audit project, a community-driven initiative to conduct the first comprehensive cryptanalysis and public security audit of the widely used TrueCrypt encryption software. White holds a Masters from Harvard and is a PhD candidate in neuroscience and cognitive science, with applied research in real-time classification and machine learning. His work on network security and forensics and been cited by media including the Wall Street Journal, Forbes, Reuters, Wired and Nature. White is a technical reviewer for the Software Engineering Institute, and publishes and speaks frequently on computational modeling, security engineering, and trust. He tweets @kennwhite.
Views: 809 Duo Security
Malware Analysis Technique - Copy Non-Selectable Window Text
 
02:39
You can find a full write-up here: http://www.ringzerolabs.com/2017/08/copying-non-selectable-window-text.html Ring Ø Labs Analysis Environment Setup: https://www.youtube.com/edit?o=U&video_id=Onqql1Zz3OE Ring Ø Labs is a Reverse Engineering site dedicated to analyzing malware, researching emergent security topics, and hacking the planet. www.RingZeroLabs.com Here are some approaches in reverse engineering a malware sample: Reverse engineer: The most obvious approach is to completely reverse engineer a piece of malware. This obviously takes a great amount of time, so other approaches are more practical. Exploitation techniques: Another approach you can take is to focus on the exploitation techniques of a piece of malware. Occasionally you will see a piece of malware that is using a new exploitation technique, or is exploiting a zero-day vulnerability. In this case you may be interested only in the specific exploitation technique so you can timebox your analysis and only look at the exploitation mechanisms. Obfuscation: Malware will often obfuscate itself and make itself difficult to analyze. You might come across malware that you have seen before without obfuscation. In that case you may only want to focus on reverse engineering the new parts. Encryption methods: A common type of malware these days is ransomware. Ransomware essentially encrypts the victim's files and locks them up so that they can't be accessed or read. Oftentimes the authors of ransomware will make mistakes when they implement the encryption mechanisms. So if you focus your research on the encryption mechanisms you might be able to find weaknesses in their implementation and/or you might be able to find hard-coded keys or weak algorithms. C&C communication: This is something that is pretty commonly done when looking at malware. Analysts often want to figure out what the communication protocol is between a piece of malware on the client's side and the server on the command and control side. The communication protocol can actually give you a lot of hints about the malware’s capabilities. Attribution: Murky area - kind of like a dark art. It usually involves a lot of guesswork, knowledge of malicious hacking teams and looking at more than one piece of malware. Categorization and clustering: You can reverse engineer malware from a broader point of view. This involves looking at malware in bulk and doing a broad-stroke analysis on lots of different malware, rather than doing a deep dive. Techniques Now, let’s look at techniques that can be utilized while analyzing malware. First of all, we use static analysis. This is the process of analyzing malware or binaries without actually running them. It can be as simple as looking at metadata from a file. It can range from doing disassembly or decompilation of malware code to symbolic execution, which is something like virtual execution of a binary without actually executing it in a real environment. Conversely, dynamic analysis is the process of analyzing a piece of malware when you are running it in a live environment. In this case, you are often looking at the behavior of the malware and looking at the side effects of what it is doing. You are running tools like process monitor and sysmon to see what kinds of artifacts a piece of malware produces after it is run. We also use automated analysis. Oftentimes if you are looking at malware you want to automate things just to speed up the process to save time. However, use caution, as with automated analysis sometimes things get missed because you are trying to do things generically. If a piece of malware contains things like anti-debugging routines or anti-analysis mechanisms, you may want to perform a manual analysis. You need to pick the right tools for the job. DISCLAIMER: Our videos are strictly for documentary, educational, and entertainment purposes only. Imitation or the use of any acts depicted in these videos is solely AT YOUR OWN RISK. We (including YouTube) will not be held liable for any injury to yourself or damage to others resulting from attempting anything shown in any our videos. We do not endorse any specific product and this video is not an attempt to sell you a good or service. These videos are free to watch and if anyone attempts to charge for this video notify us immediately. By viewing or flagging this video you are acknowledging the above.
Views: 134 H4rM0n1cH4cK
Malware Analysis - Malicious Link Files
 
14:59
Ring Ø Labs -------------------- WEBSITE: https://RingZeroLabs.com : REPORT: http://www.ringzerolabs.com/2017/12/malicious-link-files.html MALWARE ANALYSIS LAB SETUP: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLrJFR89Z-9SBDMiCtDT2_4SJxkFpc-k7P Ring Ø Labs is a Reverse Engineering site dedicated to analyzing malware, researching emergent security topics, and hacking the planet :) Here are some approaches in reverse engineering a malware sample: Reverse engineer: The most obvious approach is to completely reverse engineer a piece of malware. This obviously takes a great amount of time, so other approaches are more practical. Exploitation techniques: Another approach you can take is to focus on the exploitation techniques of a piece of malware. Occasionally you will see a piece of malware that is using a new exploitation technique, or is exploiting a zero-day vulnerability. In this case you may be interested only in the specific exploitation technique so you can timebox your analysis and only look at the exploitation mechanisms. Obfuscation: Malware will often obfuscate itself and make itself difficult to analyze. You might come across malware that you have seen before without obfuscation. In that case, you may only want to focus on reverse engineering the new parts. Encryption methods: A common type of malware these days is ransomware. Ransomware essentially encrypts the victim's files and locks them up so that they can't be accessed or read. Oftentimes the authors of ransomware will make mistakes when they implement the encryption mechanisms. So if you focus your research on the encryption mechanisms you might be able to find weaknesses in their implementation and/or you might be able to find hard-coded keys or weak algorithms. C&C communication: This is something that is pretty commonly done when looking at malware. Analysts often want to figure out what the communication protocol is a piece of malware on the client's side and the server on the command and control side. The communication protocol can actually give you a lot of hints about the malware’s capabilities. Attribution: Murky area - kind of like a dark art. It usually involves a lot of guesswork, knowledge of malicious hacking teams and looking at more than one piece of malware. Categorization and clustering: You can reverse engineer malware from a broader point of view. This involves looking at malware in bulk and doing a broad-stroke analysis on lots of different malware, rather than doing a deep dive. Techniques Now, let’s look at techniques that can be utilized while analyzing malware. First of all, we use static analysis. This is the process of analyzing malware or binaries without actually running them. It can be as simple as looking at metadata from a file. It can range from doing disassembly or decompilation of malware code to symbolic execution, which is something like virtual execution of a binary without actually executing it in a real environment. Conversely, dynamic analysis is the process of analyzing a piece of malware when you are running it in a live environment. In this case, you are often looking at the behavior of the malware and looking at the side effects of what it is doing. You are running tools like process monitor and sysmon to see what kinds of artifacts a piece of malware produces after it is run. We also use automated analysis. Oftentimes if you are looking at malware you want to automate things just to speed up the process to save time. However, use caution, as with automated analysis sometimes things get missed because you are trying to do things generically. If a piece of malware contains things like anti-debugging routines or anti-analysis mechanisms, you may want to perform a manual analysis. You need to pick the right tools for the job. DISCLAIMER: Our videos are strictly for documentary, educational, and entertainment purposes only. Imitation or the use of any acts depicted in these videos is solely AT YOUR OWN RISK. We (including YouTube) will not be held liable for any injury to yourself or damage to others resulting from attempting anything shown in any our videos. We do not endorse any specific product and this video is not an attempt to sell you a good or service. These videos are free to watch and if anyone attempts to charge for this video notify us immediately. By viewing or flagging this video you are acknowledging the above.
Views: 414 H4rM0n1cH4cK
DEF CON 20 - Dan Griffin - Hacking Measured Boot and UEFI
 
45:49
Copy of the slides for this talk are here:https://media.defcon.org/dc-20/presentations/Griffin/DEFCON-20-Griffin-Hacking-Measured-Boot-and-UEFI.pdf Hacking Measured Boot and UEFI Dan Griffin President, JW Secure, Inc. There's been a lot buzz about UEFI Secure Booting, and the ability of hardware and software manufacturers to lock out third-party loaders (and rootkits). Even the NSA has been advocating the adoption of measured boot and hardware-based integrity checks. But what does this trend mean to the open source and hacker communities? In this talk I'll demonstrate measured boot in action. I'll also be releasing my new Measured Boot Tool which allows you to view Trusted Platform Module (TPM) boot data and identify risks such as unsigned early-boot drivers. And, I'll demonstrate how measured boot is used for remote device authentication. Finally, I'll discuss weaknesses in the system (hint: bootstrapping trust is still hard), what this technology means to the consumerization trend in IT, and what software and services gaps exist in this space for aspiring entrepreneurs. Dan Griffin is the founder of JW Secure, a Seattle-based security software company. He has published several articles on security software development, as well as on IT security, and is a frequent conference speaker. Dan holds a Masters degree in Computer Science from the University of Washington and a Bachelors degree in Computer Science from Indiana University. Dan previously gained notoriety for demonstrating how to use a hacked smart card to compromise Windows Vista. Twitter: @jwsdan
Views: 408 DEFCONConference
GSEC – GIAC Exam Security Test Essentials Questions
 
01:12
For GIAC GSEC Test Questions and Answers Please Visit: https://www.PassEasily.com/GSEC.htm Exam Section 1 - 802.11 Test Questions (Test Coverage 7%) Exam Section 2 - Access Contro Testl Theory Questions (Test Coverage 6%) Exam Section 3 - Alternate Network Mapping Technique Questions (Test Coverage 7%) Exam Section 4 - Authentication and Password Management Questions (Test Coverage 5%) Exam Section 5 - Common Types of Attack Questions (Test Coverage 9%) Exam Section 6 - Contingency Planning Questions (Test Coverage 4%) Exam Section 7 - Crypto Concept Questions (Test Coverage 7%) Exam Section 8 - Crypto Fundamental Questions (Test Coverage 5%) Exam Section 9 - Defense-in-Depth Questions (Test Coverage 3%) Exam Section 10 - DNS Questions (Test Coverage 8%) Exam Section 11 - Firewall Test Subversion Questions (Test Coverage 5%) Exam Section 12 - Firewalls Questions (Test Coverage 7%) Exam Section 13 - HIDS Test Overview Questions (Test Coverage 9%) Exam Section 14 - Honeypot Questions (Test Coverage 3%) Exam Section 15 - ICMP Questions (Test Coverage 4%) Exam Section 16 - IDS Test Overview Questions (Test Coverage 2%) Exam Section 17 - Incident Handling Fundamentals Questions (Test Coverage 5%) Exam Section 18 - Information Warfare Questions (Test Coverage 4%) (Exam Time): 300 minutes (Number of Test Questions): 180 (GSEC Passing Score): 73% Security Professionals that want to demonstrate they are qualified for IT systems hands-on roles with respect to security tasks. Candidates are required to demonstrate an understanding of information security beyond simple terminology and concepts. No Specific training is required for any GIAC certification exam. There are many sources of information available regarding the certification test objectives' knowledge areas. Practical experience questions is an option; there are also numerous books on the market covering Computer Information Security exam. Another option is any relevant courses from training providers, including SANS. You will be tested for: • The test candidate will demonstrate an understanding of the different 802.11 protocols, as well as an understanding of common wireless attacks and how to prevent them. • The exam candidate will demonstrate an understanding of the fundamental theory of access control. • The GSEC candidate will demonstrate a fundamental understanding of network mapping techniques an attacker might use to examine wireless networks, and public switched telephony networks. The candidate will also demonstrate an understanding of how to identify the basic penetration techniques at a high level. • The test candidate will demonstrate understanding of the role of authentication controls, how they are managed, and the methods used to control access to systems. • The exam candidate will demonstrate the ability to identify the most common attack methods, as well as the basic strategies used to mitigate those threats. • The GSEC candidate will demonstrate a high-level understanding of the mathematical concepts which contribute to modern cryptography • The test candidate will demonstrate an understanding of the core concepts of cryptography and the three main algorithms. • The exam candidate will demonstrate an introductory understanding of the terminology and concepts of Risk and Defense-in-Depth, including threats and vulnerabilities. • The GSEC candidate will demonstrate an understanding of how firewalls can be bypassed and why additional security measures are required. • The test candidate will demonstrate a fundamental understanding of the techniques used by Host Based Intrusion Detection Systems. • The exam candidate will demonstrate understanding of basic honeypot techniques and common tools used to set up honeypots. • The GSEC candidate will demonstrate an understanding of the structure and purpose of ICMP, as well as the fields in a ICMP datagram header. • The test candidate will demonstrate an understanding of the concepts of incident handling and the six-step incident handling process. • The exam candidate will demonstrate an understanding of what OPSEC is and the threats and techniques used for protection in Operational Security.
Views: 4489 PassEasilyTests
Zilliqa | $ZIL | Next Generation - High Throughput Blockchain
 
14:15
"The Next Generation, High Throughput Blockchain Platform." Zilliqa Links: Reddit: https://www.reddit.com/r/zilliqa/ Roadmap: https://www.zilliqa.com/about.html Website: https://www.zilliqa.com/ Whitepaper: https://docs.zilliqa.com/whitepaper.pdf Mediun: https://blog.zilliqa.com/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/zilliqa Github: https://github.com/Zilliqa/Zilliqa FAQ: https://docs.zilliqa.com/techfaq.pdf Sources: https://coincentral.com/zilliqa-beginners-guide/ https://blog.zilliqa.com/more-details-on-zilliqas-token-generation-event-4e1b78e0cf5a http://cryptoincome.io/zilliqa-review/ https://unhashed.com/cryptocurrency-coin-guides/what-is-zilliqa-zil/ $ZIL Donation address: 0x4294BBB927FbB90ddD6e826701bb89226312Bb0d ►► Please up vote my profile, if you feel I deserve it! http://bit.ly/Crypto_Influencers ******************************************************************** ► Join my discord!: https://discord.gg/CpQy99C ******************************************************************** ► Follow me: Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/cryptocandor Twitter: https://twitter.com/cryptocandor Steemit: https://steemit.com/@brandneweyes Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/cryptocandor/ Website: https://www.cryptocandor.com My other vlog: https://www.youtube.com/awproductions ******************************************************************** ► Check out my favorite podcast!: http://bit.ly/CryptoBasic My cold wallet: https://www.ledgerwallet.com/r/1f08 Binance Ref Code: https://www.binance.com/?ref=10265072 Sign up with Coinbase: https://www.coinbase.com/join/588e722eee8dc54497106433 1up Donation Link: https://1upcoin.com/donate/youtube/cryptocandor ******************************************************************** ► If you're feeling generous- Tip Jars: ETH: 0x3b97C664a9DAf6c79d6d577E0048a412BaAe68dE BTC: 1K2Qjrf5KUxMpLqfmXLWJxwBnPzayoiGGL Bitcoincash: 1ECdtoqg3RcWkt4JY9bb1BrvBpLsm7h3ho LTC: LhimSAApQPY68EzXzLU1YVw4hndLfjEcXw VTC: Vdd9P644T3eLrkwKWy5eTTXTCEipiot7Y4 LSK: 1894536853028791512L PIVX: DFWUCjXZcedi6Upbf1u4BW753nj2aU5eAG BLOCK: BoCdcCLtyzxQ5ggMq3nD8j6wZ8XsYKUjyD DASH: Xx8CXP1kX3kafwyEZmismSm1UFmAQdHYuz ADA: DdzFFzCqrhtCK3FGLqHmUpuyQaUk4pADjHJyMxg3CnM7LQiKaTsqTvBa4haDJ8Rvw68SFUjKyWKy1f9XJhihXKeVonksR6qvCRSJe3vo ******************************************************************** DISCLAIMER: The information provided is not to be considered as a recommendation to buy or invest in certain assets or currencies and is provided solely as an educational and information resource to help traders make their own decisions. Past performance is no guarantee of future success. It is important to note that no system or methodology has ever been developed that can guarantee profits or ensure freedom from losses. No representation or implication is being made that using the attached material will guarantee profits or ensures freedom from losses. CryptoCandor shall not be liable to the participant for any damages, claims, expenses or losses of any kind (whether direct or indirect) suffered by the participant arising from or in connection with the information obtained this website or directly from the website owner.
Views: 6901 CryptoCandor
Быстрые гликолитические (белые) и медленные окислительные (красные) мышечные волокна
 
04:48
https://www.instagram.com/prometei.tech/ reassured screamed liter favoring traction wondered reconsider realizing plow nap brain's ebb manifests CVD HDL minutiae ducks They've sufficed proponents waged salvo yearlong Tulane coverage unanimously sarcasm Pundits predictors coffin headlines representative enrolled Asians demographic diehards implausible slashing upped group's balloons publicized uptick bioelectrical impedance predictor LDL carbers pedestrian cuttingsome glean takeaways echoed study's Lydia Bazzano compel directing dogmatic almighty Jake fascinating devoting installment I’ve mmols Wingates foggy acuity tissue's oxidize Phinney synonymous Mistaking intriguing teamed Auburn Wolfe's CPT impede trash Someone's calorically reintroduction reintroduce blunts Paoli transitioned lasted Ketostix conservatively reversals lackluster telltale stroll tantamount deluge chockfull edibles aisle Who's les courgettes serrated peeler spiralizer wonderfully hash browns mandolin dubbed cauliflower's spuds pulverize Brassica wallop Chard sauté cremini shiitake fungi umami portobello stealthily praised dearth smear firepower backlash au naturale pint shrivelled rosy orbs lycopene Nature's lengthwise microwavable parchment scrape benevolent gourd Radish Bok choy Watercress famously sang stoned sweetness tinged tipoff nondigestible plush stellar sniffles pucker Fillets mercury unseasoned marinades ante beloved deli spared lunchmeats Dijon collard fests fattened Cornish hen Gruyere mundane decoupled riff blending pinches mop cultured surging critters tangy horns cow's Brie Ricotta kefir carnivores soaks brilliantly marinate Tempeh earthy mushroomy crumbling casseroles sauerkraut Pinto boast Pepitas o castoffs Sargento stringy bathed humming lofty healthyomega shops supermarkets Pepperettes Hazelnuts Bob's fare Shirataki translucent gelatinous konjac bowlful nondescript rinse blanch Preliminary prediabetes viscous Hazelnut brewed quencher moo cartons sidestep Imbibing infuses exhaustive flapjacks marys ye sipped seltzer contradictory farther swilling interchangeably insulinogenic spur counterintuitive accessing tougher adjusts Mozzarella cucumbers kcals reservoir thriving ongoing chow insisted French's Trimmed Uncured Portabella condensed tamari aminos steamer bubbly Ruthie ours marshmallows dye pumpkins fl Truvia Nutmeg Cloves towels masher lumpy quartered ½ generously pierced family's else's cleanup cooks Kosher slits slit PDF unwrap tossed bowl's ooohs aaaahs mouthwatering Coarse wilt bakes Sprouted crumb crumbs crumble byproducts apiece appreciable granite unconditioned stepmill app Centopani eater groundbreaking world's Evan's insists com's it'd befriending fluke flounder rutabaga turnips distributing rigors regimented hamburgers Animal's flagship Pak negotiable fundamentally depleting plows wishful oversimplified depletes Karbolyn Labrada's shuttling muscles replenished proponent dragging microtraumas pounder resynthesis disposal polymer shuttle Elasti RTD MRP EFA Charge Krill MPS rapamycin hesitate Centopani's diner steakhouse wheelbarrow Overseas border nearest awful refrigeration Stak Iconic XL Beanie Rotisserie precooked breaded standby powered brothers McGrath Antoine Vaillant baggie brainer Nothing's comforting goulash Slurp swole requested dad's bursting rotini parsnips I’ll paprika Worcestershire Caraway saucepot batch Printable Frosting silicone brethren Vincenzo Masone Fritz approached days steal sanitary basa jumbo gallbladder crowns handfuls plums nectarines underconsumed drilled skulls lid poking USDA thickest translates clump cruciferous broil cardamom thankfully occasions roasting dicing drizzling facet pectin midworkout plump insides glorious skimp Tahini Cumin pretzels sing Ramen entrée zing sharpest leftover pinapple Endive chilies clove crumbles vinaigrette Kalamata pitted Oregano Bragg's tonight's Mendelsohn frothy stove fortunate micromanaging achievements NASCAR skimping mussels rabbit seitan grapefruits limes Melons honeydew apricots… chestnuts overanalyzing fistful plateauing stricter fistfuls arrangement honing afforded it'll Fiber's Satiate Yep compiled SOUTHWEST potlucks bevy ROMA SEEDED uncovered BALSAMIC yummy clocks heats PARSNIP resealable rimmed Discard FE COB THINLY spinner BURRITO RINSED GARNISHES STROGANOFF CAMPBELL'S SHERRY dente garnished Dorian coveted GROUNDED hesitation filets tenderloins scours tags grabs fattier semblance beefing thrifty exchanges D's rodeo beeline Quaker swayed canister opts canisters measly sizzling sitcom Kris EZ sec Bathe proverbial anticipate Radar Benchmarks Robergs R Pearson Costill Fink J Pascoe Benedict Zachweija intensities Calder Yaqoob Bowtell Gelly Simeoni Rennie Wang uncompromising Welsh Kage meditative yin coincides iconoclast's sellers efficaciously replicate brand's Vitargo disguise bitterness reluctantly Offerings Hydra underperforming refilming raced biked deadlifted Ironman Matt Pritchard Ironmans swears triathletes Trainee Hey faceless
Views: 25681 ПРОКАЧКА
Thomas Lee Presents The Economics of Cryptocurrencies | Upfront Summit 2018
 
23:27
Slides available here: https://www.slideshare.net/msuster/fundstrat-bitcoin-blockchain-presentation-for-upfront-summit
Views: 136765 Upfront Ventures