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Ankle Pain, ankle ligaments sprain - Everything You Need To Know - Dr. Nabil Ebraheim
 
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Dr. Ebraheim’s educational animated video describes conditions and treatment methods associated with pain of the ankle. High ankle sprain •A high ankle sprain is a sprain of the syndesmotic ligaments that connect the tibia and fibula at the ankle. •Diagnosis of syndesmotic injury is usually done by the use of external rotation stress view examination or CT scan. This patient may require surgery. Anterolateral impingment •Painful limitation of full range of ankle motion due to soft tissue or osseous (bony) pathology. •Soft tissue thickeneing commonly seen in athletes with prior trauama that extends into the ankle jint. •Arthroscopy of the ankle may be helpful . •Tibisl bone spur impinging on the talus can become a source of chronic ankle pain and limitation of ankle motion in athletes. Osseous (bony) spur on the anterior lip of tibia contacting the talus during dorsiflexion. The patient may need debridment of the spur. Ankle sprain •Pain that is anterior and around the fibula can usually be attributed to a ligament sprain. •Sprains result from the stretching and tearing (partial or complete) of small ligaments that can become damaged when the ankle is forced into an unnatural position. •Treatment includes immobilization, ice therapy, physical therapy and rarely surgery. •With ankle sprain, the patient will be able to walk, but it will be painful. With a fracture, the patient will be unable to walk. Pain that is posterior to the fibula can usually be attributed to an injury of the peroneal tendons. Lateral ankle pain •Patients with peroneal tendon problemes usually describe pain in the outer part of the ankle or just behind the lateral malleolus. •Problems mainly occus in the area where the tendons of the two muscles glide within a fibrous tunnel . Peroneal inflammation/ tendonitis •Tendons are subject to excessive repetitive forces causing pain and swelling. •Peroneal tendon subluxation •Usually occurs secondary to an ankle sprain with retinaculum injury. •Occurs with dorsiflexion and usually eversion of the ankle. Posterior anle pain Achilles tendonitis •Irritation and inflammation due to overuse. •Pain, swelling and tears within the tendon. •Achilles tendon can become prone to injury or rupture with age, lack of use or by aggressive exercises. •The Thompson test is performed to determine the presence of an Achilles tendon rupture. A positive result for the thompson’s test is determined by no movement of the ankle while squeezing of the calf muscles. Posterior ankle impingment •Os trigonum or large posterior process of talus (stieda syndrome) •Common among athletes such as ballet dancers. •May be seen in association with flexor hallucis longus tenosynovitis. Tarsal tunnel syndrome •Compression or squeezing on the posterior tibial nerve that produces symptoms of pain and numbness on the medial area of the ankle. •When conservative treatment methods fail, surgical treatment or tarsal tunnel release surgery may be needed. Posterior tibial tendon tears are one of the leading causes of failing arches (flatfoot) in adults. •Too many toes sign •Loss of medial arch height •Pain on the medial ankle with weight bearing Arthritis of the ankle joint •Commonly the result of a prior injury or inflammation to the ankle joint. •Can usually be easily diagnosed with an examination and x-ray. Osteochondral lesion of the talus •Arthroscopic debridment may be necessary. Please go to the following link and support the artist Johnny Widmer in his art contest - Sign to Facebook and click LIKE https://www.facebook.com/marlinmag/photos/a.10153261748858040.1073741838.134227843039/10153261754338040/?type=3&theater Thank you! https://www.facebook.com/JohnnyWidmerArt?fref=ts http://www.johnnywidmer.com/
Views: 642697 nabil ebraheim
Mayo Clinic Minute: Ankle sprains 101
 
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"Each year over a million people have new ankle sprains, and these are just the people who came to seek medical help," says Dr. Glenn Shi, a Mayo Clinic orthopedic surgeon. "There are far more [sprains] that people are treating at home." The ankle is quite a well-engineered joint, actually. But, because it's a balancing act to carry the full weight of the body on three bones atop the foot, Dr. Shi says, "An injury can happen anytime an athlete gets on the field or to anyone just walking down the street. In fact, ankle sprains among high school athletes are the most common injury that they see." Still, there are ways to reduce the risk, particularly if you understand how the ankle is put together. More health and medical news on the Mayo Clinic News Network http://newsnetwork.mayoclinic.org/
Views: 424353 Mayo Clinic
Friction the Deltoid Ligaments: Unraveling the Mystery of Ankle Pain Series Preview
 
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Did you know that 25,000 people sprain their ankle every single day? After the low back, the ankle is probably the second most common area of injury. In most cases, ankle sprains do not heal well without some treatment. That's a lot of clients who need you. Unraveling the Mystery of Ankle Pain 4-part webinar series worth 6 CE hours is available at: http://www.benbenjamin.com/webinarDescrip.php?id=S_881958787 When an ankle sprain does not heal properly, it can become a chronic problem. The ligament may have been stretched or may have developed poorly formed (and therefore weak) adhesive scare tissue, causing instability at the joint. Strenuous activities continually re-tear the scar tissue, resulting in a seemingly endless cycle of pain that comes and goes, with intermittent swelling. This can continue for many years if the injury is not properly treated. Learn to assess & treat 8 varieties of Ankle Sprains in this 4-part webinar series by Dr. Ben Benjamin. You'll come away understanding the relevant anatomy and assessment for each of these conditions, as well as therapeutic techniques for those you can treat and referral guidelines for those you cannot.
Views: 27746 Ben Benjamin
The Talar Tilt Test | Lateral Ankle Sprain
 
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Enroll in our online course: http://bit.ly/PTMSK DOWNLOAD OUR APP: 📱 iPhone/iPad: https://goo.gl/eUuF7w 🤖 Android: https://goo.gl/3NKzJX GET OUR ASSESSMENT BOOK ▶︎▶︎ http://bit.ly/GETPT ◀︎◀︎ This is not medical advice. The content is intended as educational content for health care professionals and students. If you are a patient, seek care of a health care professional. The Talar Tilt Test may be used to assess a lateral ankle sprain and the integrity of the talofibular and deltoid ligaments. Article: www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10589849 Visit our Website: http://bit.ly/29xmSzV Like us on Facebook: http://bit.ly/29GyogP Follow on Instagram: http://bit.ly/29HN0Lp
Views: 181091 Physiotutors
Chronic Lateral Ankle Instability - Everything You Need To Know - Dr. Nabil Ebraheim
 
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Dr. Ebraheims animated educational video describing the condition of chronic lateral ankle instability Ankle sprain is a common injury that occurs with sports activities and the lateral ligaments are the most commonly injured ligaments in the ankle. Three ligaments on the ankle joint on the lateral side: 1- Anterior talofibular ligament: is the weakest ligament of all three of them, the integrity of this ligament is tested by preforming the anterior drawer test. 2- The posterior talofibular ligament: is the strongest of the three ligaments. 3- Calcaneofibular ligament: injury to this ligament usually occurs after injury to the anterior talofibular ligament, the integrity of this ligament is tested by preforming the talar tilt test. If the patient cannot bear weight after what is suspected ankle sprain, then you need to get an x-ray to check if the patient has a fracture. Acute ankle sprains are usually treated by: • Immobilization • Ice • Physical therapy • Surgery (rare) Sometimes these ligaments do not heal and become incompetent. Incompetence of these ligaments may create chronic lateral ankle instability. You may want to examine the hindfoot for varus malalignment. Occult varus may lead to treatment failure. Check for peroneal muscles and tendon weakness which is a frequent cause of lateral ankle instability. If you find that there is hindfoot varus, you may need to do the coleman block test to differentiate between fixed and flexible hindfoot varus. The treatment will be different. Treatment: The majority of ankle sprains will heal with time and are treated with: • Rest • Physical therapy - Peroneal muscle strengthening with proprioception and range of motion of the ankle. In some cases the patient may not get better and may have: • Mechanical instability or functional instability • Patient may not improve with conservative treatment - Patient may require surgery What type of surgery may be necessary? • Anatomic repair (Brostrom procedure). Direst repair of the attenuated ligament. OR • Anatomis repair (Modified Brostrom procedure). • Direct ligament repair with augmentation using the inferior extensor retinaculum. • A graft can be used if the Brostrom technique fails. For chronic lateral ankle instability, we also need to look for other conditions such as peroneal tendon pathology, fractures, joint lesions, or arthritis. There are a lot of differential diagnosis for this area that can create ankle instability. These are some of the other causes that can create the same symptoms of pain and instability of the lateral ankle. When pain is located posterior to the fibula, you can blame this on peroneal tendon pathology. The peroneal tendons are subjected to excessive repetitive forces causing pain, swelling, and instability of the lateral ankle. Treated by injection or possibly surgery (synovectomy). The superior peroneal retinaculum is usually holding two peroneal tendons behind the fibula. The inferior peroneal retinaculum is not as important as the superior peroneal retinaculum. Superior peroneal retinaculum tear: - Tear may lead to subluxation of the peroneal tendons. - Do physical therapy or reconstruction of the superior peroneal retinaculum. Peroneal tendon subluxation occurs with dorsiflexion and inversion; however it is tested with dorsiflexion and eversion against resistance. Peroneus longus or brevis tendon rupture or tear: - Tear of the peroneus longus tendon may occur at the peroneal tubercle with the Os Peroneum migrationg proximally. - Tears of the peroneus brevis may occur with peroneal tendon subluxation. - In these cases you will do repair or tenodesis of the torn tendon. Lesions inside the joint: - Osteochondral lesion of the talus (OCD): they are 2 types: • Posteromedial • Anterolateral Treatment: • NSAIDS • Physical therapy • Surgical treatment: ankle arthroscopy. - If the OCD lesion is less than 1 cm then you will do excision, curettage, or drilling of the lesion. - Anterolateral Impingement: painful limitation of full range of ankle motion due to asseous (bony) or soft tissue pathology. - Treatment: • physical Therapy • injection • arthroscopic debridement of the impingment - ankle synovitis: you do synovectomy. - Ankle arthritis: ankle arthritis of the ankle joint usually results from prior injury or inflammation to the ankle joint. - It can be diagnosed by an exam or by an x-ray. - We start with conservative treatment, brace, injection, if nothing works do arthrodesis or total ankle surgery if conservative treatment fails. - If there is loose bodies inside the ankle, remove it. - There may be some fractures that cause instability of the ankle, like lateral process fracture of the talus, anterior process fracture of the calcaneus. - Jones fracture or Pseudo- Jones fracture. - The treatment is specific for the type of fracture. - This needs to be diagnosed and treated accordingly. - Osteal coalition: may cause frequent ankle instability.
Views: 89418 nabil ebraheim
Physical Therapy Treatments : How to Heal Ligaments
 
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When healing ligaments, do exercises to strengthen the surrounding muscles after adequate rest. Use exercises to support your joints following a sprain with help from a physical therapist in this free video on physical therapy treatments. Expert: Tricia Trinque MHE, PT Contact: www.seabreezephysicaltherapy.com Bio: Tricia Trinque MHE, PT is a physical therapist with more than 25 years of experience. Filmmaker: Leonora Fishbein Series Description: Physical therapy treatments are beneficial for many injuries and illnesses, from gout to arthritis and fractured bones. Learn an array of stretches and exercises to relieve pain and tension from illness and injury with help from a physical therapist in this free video series on physical therapy treatments.
Views: 57474 ehowhealth
Top 3 Treatments for Posterior Tibial Tendonitis (Exercises Included)
 
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Famous Physical Therapists Bob Schrupp and Brad Heineck demonstrate the top 3 treatments for Posterior Tibial Tendonitis. They have included some effective exercises. Check out the Products Bob and Brad LOVE on their Amazon Channel: https://www.amazon.com/shop/physicaltherapyvideo
Views: 206344 Bob & Brad
Calcaneofibular Ligament Fascial Separation
 
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The Benjamin Institute, the international online center for instant, quality, convenient and affordable continuing education from leading massage therapy experts. http://www.benbenjamin.com
Views: 10618 Ben Benjamin
Tear Talofibular Ligament
 
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รักษาเอ็นข้อเท้าขาด
Views: 31220 Yolchai Jongjirasiri
Musculoskeletal Physical Exam: Ankle
 
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Dr. Mark Stovak demonstrates how to conduct a musculoskeletal physical exam: on the ankle. http://www.viachristi.org/doctor/mark-l-stovak-md
Views: 312669 Ascension Via Christi
Knee Pain Caused By Fibular Head :: WODdoc :: Project365 :: Episode 474
 
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For more episodes and additional information about this post visit www.thewoddoc.com www.thewoddoc.com Subscribe Now.... New Episodes Daily Check WODdoc out on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, & SnapChat: https://www.facebook.com/thewoddoc
Views: 55749 WOD doc
Ankle Ligament Tear Treatment
 
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Chronic ankle sprains and talofibular ligament tears are commonly treated with Prolotherapy, a regenerative injection technique. In this video, Ross Hauser, MD discusses ankle ligament tears and treatment course. To learn more about Prolo and the types of chronic pain and injuries we treat, please visit us at: http://www.caringmedical.com/prolotherapy Thanks for watching! Contact our team to tell us more about your case and see if you are a good candidate for our treatments: http://www.caringmedical.com/contact-us/ Access our published research and articles on Regenerative Medicine: http://www.prolotherapy.org/ Find us on Social Media: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/stemcellprolotherapy/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/explore/locations/1030271890/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/CaringMedical?ref_src=twsrc%5Egoogle%7Ctwcamp%5Eserp%7Ctwgr%5Eauthor Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/caringmedicalre/
Ankle Sprain Treatment Oakland Chiropractor Ankle Pain - Sports Injury Treatment
 
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Ankle sprain treatment by Oakland Chiropractor Dr. Sandy Baird. Riverstone Chiropractic sports chiropractor describes the types of ankle sprains, the causes of sprained ankles, and the chiropractic treatment and rehab for ankle sprains. For more information visit us on our website at www.riverstonechiropractic.com or call us at (510) 465-2342. Transcript: Hi, I'm Dr. Sandy Baird, owner of Riverstone Chiropractic here in Oakland California. We're going to be talking about ankle sprains today. So a lot of people will come into our office and they are actually very surprised that there's anything that can be done to help them recover from their ankle sprain. The old adage used to be, if you sprain your ankle, roll your ankle, you put some ice on it, you elevate it on a bed, and wait for it to heal up. But there's actually a lot you can do about an ankle sprain. So let's look at the anatomy of the ankle and get a picture of what's happening when you twist your ankle. The most common type of ankle sprain is an inversion sprain, and that's when the bottom of the foot rolls inward in relation to the lower leg. When this happens, the ligaments on the lateral side of the ankle become damaged. Those ligaments, there's three of them, there's the anterior and posterior talofibular ligament, and there's the calcaneofibular ligament. So we'll look at a picture of this anatomy, it basically means ligaments connecting the bones in the foot to the bone in the lower leg, the fibula, that's on the outside of the leg. Picture of the three supporting ligaments forming a triangle of support. Ankle sprains are graded on a scale of 1-3, so a grade 1 ankle sprain would be a mild ankle sprain, you just tear a couple of fibers in one of the ligaments, grade 2 is a moderate sprain, a partial tear of a ligament, and grade 3 is a very severe ankle sprain, you typically will require surgery or at least need to be evaluated for surgery. But grade 1 and 2 ankle sprains can be managed by chiropractic care. Did you know that the #1 cause of an ankle sprain is actually history of a previous ankle sprain?! Other causes of ankle sprains include jumping and landing funny, tripping over some rocks or roots when you're doing train running, slipping, falling off a curb, and any other strange sports injuries, you can twist your ankle falling off a bicycle. So there's a few things we need to do if you sprain your ankle. We need to check whether the talus or the calcaneus has become fixated, oftentimes the muscles along the outside of the leg, the peroneal muscles, they will actually pull a bone into what's called subluxation. That's basically pulling the bone into a position it's not supposed to be in, it becomes fixated, and adhesions form right around the joint, so all of a sudden the bones in the foot do not move as well. There's 26 bones in the foot, and the ones that are most commonly involved with the ankle sprain are going to be the talus and the calcaneus, but there could be subluxation of any of the bones. So a chiropractor needs to check everything, adjust what needs to be adjusted. The next thing is soft tissue work, so anytime the peroneal muscles are overworked or overused, they are going to develop these adhesions. This happens with an ankle sprain, this happens with overuse, really any overworking condition. You need to reduce the adhesions, you can either do that with Active Release Techniques, with Graston Technique, there are some other techniques that will do this, but you have to get the adhesions out. Pictorial example of chiropractic adjustment to treat ankle sprain. Once we've addressed those things, and the ankle has become more stable, we can start some rehabilitation exercises, it's going to be mostly focusing on the peroneal muscles, the ones that have actually become overworked, get those strong by using either bands or light weight. So we'll be addressing the peroneal muscles, and addressing the deep calf muscles, and anything else that has become weak or overworked in this ankle sprain. So a lot of times there are contributing factors, there actually could be a weakness happening in the hip or the glute which causes the person to sprain their ankle in the first place. We look at all that and prescribe rehabilitation exercises to strengthen all the areas involved. If you've suffered an ankle sprain or you have any questions about ankle sprains or any other sports injuries, please give us a call at (510) 465-2342 or check out our website at www.riverstonechiropractic.com. Thanks for watching! Also, check out www.engineeringyourbody.com for my easy-to-follow science-based corrective exercise program that's designed to help you overcome the most common compensation patterns in runners that can cause foot, knee, or hip pain.
Medial Collateral Ligament injury , MCL Injuries - Everything You Need To Know - Dr. Nabil Ebraheim
 
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Dr. Ebraheim’s educational animated video describes injuries associated with the Medial Collateral Ligament – MCL. The Medial Collateral Ligament is one of four major ligaments of the knee (MCL, LCL, PCL & ACL). The Medial Collateral Ligament extend from the medial epicondyle of the femur to below the medial condyle of the tibia. The MCL is a static stabilizer composed of superficial (primary) and deep (secondary) portions that are restraints to valgus stress. Superficial MCL •Primary restraint to valgus stress. •Proximal attachment: posterior aspect of medial femoral condyle. •Distal attachment: metaphyseal region of the tibia about 5 cm distal to the joint lying beneath the pes anserinus. Deep MCL •Secondary restraints to valgus stress. •Inserts directly into edge of tibial plateau and meniscus. •May be separated from the superficial layer by a bursa. The joined tendons of the Sartorius, gracilis, semitendinosus muscles cross on top of the lower part of the MCL. The pes anserine bursa is located anterior to the insertion of the medial collateral ligament to the tibia. The MCL’s primary function is to be a restraint to valgus stress. The MCL is the most commonly injured ligament of the knee. The typical mechanism of injury of the MCL is due to a valgus and external rotation force. A typical blow to the knee usually causes complete rupture of the MCL. Rupture may occur proximally or distally. Tears of the proximal MCL have a greater healing rate. Tears of the distal MCL may not heal well (similar to Stener lesion of the thumb). Associated conditions •ACL tears: injury to ACL compromise up tp 90% of associated injuries. Rupture of the ACL causes anterolateral rotatory instability. The majority of MCL injuries that are associated with ACL injuries are grade III complete rupture, no end point with valgus stress at 30 degree and 0 degree of knee flexion. •Meniscal tears: Up to 5% of isolated MCL injuries are associated with meniscal tears. Not a common injury. Classification of MCL sprains •Grade I: sprain, stretch injury •Grade II: partial tear of the MCL. •Grade III: complete tear of the ligament. No end point with valgus stress at 30 degree of knee flexion. Presentation History: pop sensation Symptoms: pain and tenderness usually higher than the joint line. Physical exam: tenderness along medial aspect of the knee, ecchymosis, knee effusion. Testing for MCL injury •Positive valgus stress test at 30 degree of knee flexion indicated injury to the superficial MCL. •Opening around 1 cm indicated a grade III complete tear of the MCL •Positive valgus stress test at 0 degrees of knee extension indicates posteromedial capsule or cruciate ligament injury in addition to MCL injury (means combined injury). •Always evaluate for other injuries (ACL, PCL or medial meniscal tear). Pellegrini-Steida syndrome •Radiographs are usually normal however may show calcification at the medial femoral site (Pellegrini-Steida syndrome) •Calcification due to chronic MCL deficiency at the medial femoral insertion site. •Pediatric patient with a knee injury and suspected salter fracture should get stress views x-ray to rule out a growth plate injury. •Growth plates are weaker than ligaments (may use MRI instead of stress views). MRI is the study of choice as it identifies the location and extent of the MCL injury. Treatment •NSAIDS. •Rest •Therapy: minor sprain of the MCL require therapy with return to play in about a week. May use a brace if injury is grade II, return to play in about 2-4 weeks. With grade III injury, return to play in about 6-8 weeks. •Surgery: surgery in grade III injuries with multiple ligament injury especially with distal avulsion fracture. If there is chronic instability with opening in full extension, do reconstruction. Additional arthroscopy may be needed to rule out associated injury. In combined MCL and ACL injuries, usually surgery for the ACL is delayed until the MCL heals (up to eight weeks). Use ACL brace. Complications include: stiffness and loss of motion. Laxity is associated with distal MCL injuries. Functional bracing may reduce an MCL injury in football players, particularly interior linemen. Become a friend on facebook: http://www.facebook.com/drebraheim Follow me on twitter: https://twitter.com/#!/DrEbraheim_UTMC Donate to the University of Toledo Foundation Department of Orthopaedic Surgery Endowed Chair Fund: https://www.utfoundation.org/foundation/home/Give_Online.aspx?sig=29 Background music provided as a free download from YouTube Audio Library. Song Title: Every Step
Views: 147901 nabil ebraheim
Radial Wave and Laser Treatment for Foot Pain
 
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Sheldon Nadal DPM performs a radial wave treatment and a laser treatment on a patient with foot pain. http://www.footcare.net 501-586 Eglinton Avenue East Toronto, ON M4P 1P2 (416) 486-9917 "This young gentleman is a basketball player named Kobe - not THAT Kobe, but a local Kobe who is getting ready to go to an international basketball and sports tournament and represent our country, Canada. Kobe injured his ankle three weeks ago and we're doing our best to get him into shape so he can play ball and win a gold medal. And you can see the left ankle is considerably swollen, he did sprain his ankle, and we're gonna give him two treatments. Well, we've already given him one treatment, a whirlpool, or hydrotherapy, treatment, and now I'm gonna give him a combination of sound wave treatment followed by a laser treatment. What we hope to do is help to reduce his swelling and encourage healing and get him back on his feet. This unit is the hand piece for a sound wave modality called radial wave or pressure wave. Some people call it radial shock wave. It's not a true shock wave, but it is a very effective modality for reducing pain and inflammation. Kobe has pain inferior to the ankle, where the ligament is, but he also has pain up on the actual ankle bone which we call the lateral malleolus. Okay, faster. This is the therapeutic laser. We're gonna start at the anterior aspect of the distal fibula where Kobe's been getting a lot of pain. We're gonna do two minutes here. The laser and the sound waves impart energy to the cells of the soft tissue. The energy gets absorbed by the chromophores in the cell, particularly with the laser, and that energy can then be used by the tissues for healing. It is believed that growth factors are released by the sound waves and those, too, help to reduce inflammation and encourage healing. Now I'm doing the lateral aspect of the distal fibula which is the ankle bone on the outside of the foot. With a severe ankle sprain, it's actually possible - usually the ligaments will tear - and it's actually possible to break the distal fibula if it's a bad enough sprain. Another reason we've got to get Kobe better is because, in addition to playing in a very important tournament, he is being coached by none other than Digger Phelps, the great coach of Notre Dame. He has the honor of being yelled at by Digger Phelps. I wish I was going so that Digger Phelps could yell at me too. Okay, now we're gonna do the posterior, or back, aspect of the distal fibula. And the super pulse helps to get the energy deep into the tissues. The anterior tailofibular area, where there's a ligament that is probably one that is sprained in the injury. And now we're gonna do the last part, the posterior aspect, the back of the ankle. The actual therapeutic part of the laser is invisible but what we can see is the red aiming beam. Okay, so, our treatment is finished, and Kobe's gonna put a ceramic ankle support around his ankle. It will give him a little bit of support and a little bit of compression and there are ceramic particles which are supposed to reflect the body's heat back into the body so it actually is somewhat therapeutic. And we're gonna continue to give Kobe treatments until he goes and we're hoping to get him back into top shape, or as good as possible."
Views: 4640 Sheldon H Nadal, DPM
How Long Do Knee Ligament Injuries Take To Heal? - Manipal Hospital
 
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In this Video, Dr. Sunil Kini, Consultant Joint Replacement Arthroscopic surgeon explains the healing in ligament injuries How long do knee ligaments take to heal without surgery? The Medial Collateral ligament injuries are usually treated without surgery by advocating Bracing and physiotherapy. It takes about 6 weeks to 3 months to heal. After about 6 Weeks, ligament scars down and is assessed by the doctor How long do knee ligaments take to heal with surgery? ACL or Medial collateral injury takes 6 weeks for the healing to start after injury and progressed considerably. Graft healing takes 9 months to 1 year and hence we advise the patients to engage in sporting or other activities only after 9 months. How do you know if the surgery is required or not? Patient is assessed for clinical stability and MRI scanning is done. If the patient is unstable ie, if there is wobbling in the knee or knee giving way, we correlate it to the MRI findings and usually there would be partial or complete tear in the ligament which needs to be operated. The patients with no instability can be treated without surgery with bracing and physiotherapy. Best Hospital in India: Manipal Hospitals is one of the top multi-specialty hospitals in India located in all major cities like Bangalore, Vijayawada, Visakhapatnam, Goa, Salem, Jaipur, Mangalore. Provides world class 24/7 Emergency services. Our top surgeons are expertise in offering the best treatment for Heart, Brain, Cancer, Eye, Kidney, Joint replacement surgery & all major surgeries at an affordable cost. Health Check up packages are also available. To know more visit our website : https://www.manipalhospitals.com/ Get Connected Here: ================== Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ManipalHospitalsIndia Google+: https://plus.google.com/111550660990613118698 Twitter: https://twitter.com/ManipalHealth Pinterest: https://in.pinterest.com/manipalhospital Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/company/manipal-hospital Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/manipalhospitals/ Foursquare: https://foursquare.com/manipalhealth Alexa: http://www.alexa.com/siteinfo/manipalhospitals.com Blog: https://www.manipalhospitals.com/blog/
Views: 125406 Manipal Hospitals
Posterior Tibial Tendonitis Stretches & Exercises - Ask Doctor Jo
 
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Posterior tibial tendonitis can be very painful and make the foot unstable. These stretches and exercises should be able to help if your posterior tibial tendon becomes inflamed or torn. See Doctor Jo’s blog post about this at: http://www.askdoctorjo.com/posterior-tibial-tendonitis The posterior tibial tendon can cause a lot of problems in the foot and ankle. It provides support and stability to the foot. It runs on the inside of the leg and foot, and it is the main muscle for inversion, or pulling your foot inwards. Start off with propping your ankle up on a roll or hang your foot off the bed or table so your heel doesn't touch the floor. Put the band around the ball of your foot for good resistance. First, push your foot down and up. This is called ankle plantarflexion. Now you want to wrap the band around your other foot. This time you will have resistance pulling out. This is ankle eversion. Next you are going to cross your foot over the foot with the band as seen in the video, and pull your foot inward. This is ankle inversion. Try not to move the whole leg with these exercises. Just move at the ankle. Now you are going to do some simple toe walking. Lift your heels off the ground and walk on your toes. Try to do this for 30 seconds, and work your way up to a minute. If you need to take a break in between, you can. The next exercise will be a balance series. Stand on one foot, but hold onto something sturdy. Try to balance for 30 seconds to a minute. When that becomes easy, just use one finger one each side. Then just one finger for balance, and finally try balancing without holding on at all. Finally, you will do a stretch. The stretch is similar to a soleus stretch. So you will start off leaning against something sturdy. Put the leg you want to stretch back into a lunge position. Keeping both feet facing forward, bend your front knee, and then keeping your back heel down bend your back knee. The final step to this stretch is to bend the knee inward toward your other knee to get the posterior tibialis stretch. Hold this stretch for 30 seconds, and repeat 3 times. Related Videos: Ankle Strengthening Exercises & Stretches: https://youtu.be/g-iXYapbuqk?list=PLPS8D21t0eO9JGYS958XUh2mkV8Sa2sAq Lateral Sprained Ankle Stretches & Exercises: https://youtu.be/3JJayVC0-20?list=PLPS8D21t0eO9JGYS958XUh2mkV8Sa2sAq =========================================== SUBSCRIBE for More Videos: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=askdoctorjo ======================================= Doctor Jo is a Doctor of Physical Therapy. http://www.AskDoctorJo.com http://www.facebook.com/AskDoctorJo http://www.pinterest.com/AskDoctorJo https://www.instagram.com/AskDoctorJo http://www.twitter.com/AskDoctorJo http://plus.google.com/+AskDoctorJo ======================================= Posterior Tibial Tendonitis Stretches & Exercises: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9H1Mf9eRH8k DISCLAIMER: This content (the video, description, links, and comments) is not medical advice or a treatment plan and is intended for general education and demonstration purposes only. This content should not be used to self-diagnose or self-treat any health, medical, or physical condition. Don’t use this content to avoid going to your own healthcare professional or to replace the advice they give you. Consult with your healthcare professional before doing anything contained in this content. You agree to indemnify and hold harmless Ask Doctor Jo, LLC and its officers for any and all losses, injuries, or damages resulting from any and all claims that arise from your use or misuse of this content. Ask Doctor Jo, LLC makes no representations about the accuracy or suitability of this content. Use of this content is at your sole risk.
Views: 87456 AskDoctorJo
Ankle Ligament Injury Tests & Assessment - Everything You Need To Know - Dr. Nabil Ebraheim
 
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Dr. Ebraheim’s educational animated video describes the ligaments of the Ankle. An ankle sprain is usually low ankle sprain, but occasionally high ankle sprain. Other conditions associated: •Osteochondral lesion •Peroneal tendon subluxation •Lateral process fracture of the talus •Anterior process fracture of the calcaneus •High syndesmotic injury Tests for injury of these ligaments: •Anterior drawer test •Squeeze test •External rotation stress test •Talar tilt test (inversion test). If the patient can’t bear weight on the ankle, the patient should get an x-ray. Injury to the deltoid ligament occurs on the medial side of the ankle joint and usually associated with fracture. Injury to the lateral side ligament is referred to as ankle sprain. The anterior tibiofibular ligament is the west on the lateral side. Anterior drawer test: is done to test the competency of the anterior tibiofibular ligament. The test is done in 20 degrees of plantar flexion and compares it to the other side. A shift of an absolute value of 9 mm on the lateral x-ray or 5mm compared to the other side is positive. The calcaneofibular ligament is usually injured after the anterior talofibular ligament. talar tilt test: less than 5 degrees of tilt is usually normal. A high ankle sprain may require surgery. Always track the fibula proximally to avoid missing a Maisonneuve fracture. Squeeze test is used to diagnose high ankle sprain. By squeezing the tibia and fibula at the mid-calf this causes pain at the syndesmosis if high ankle sprain is present. External rotation stress test: place the ankle in a neutral position, then apply external rotation stress and get a mortise view radiograph. The positive result if the tibiofibular clear space is more than 5 mm. there is also a positive result if the medial clear space is more than 4 mm. Become a friend on facebook: http://www.facebook.com/drebraheim Follow me on twitter: https://twitter.com/#!/DrEbraheim_UTMC
Views: 105471 nabil ebraheim
Ankle Pain Complete Overview - Everything You Need To Know - Dr. Nabil Ebraheim
 
10:44
Dr. Ebraheim’s educational animated video describes the anatomy of the anterior compartment of the foot, and the injuries and conditions associated with the ankle. There are many structures present at the anterior aspect of the ankle. These structures are often susceptible to injury. Common injuries and conditions around the anterior ankle 1-Anterolateral impingement: Painful limitation of full range of ankle motion due to soft tissue or osseous pathology. Soft tissue thickening commonly seen in athletes with prior trauma that extends into the ankle joint. Tibial bone spur impinging on the talus can become a source of chronic ankle pain and limitation of ankle motion in athletes. 2-Arthritis of the ankle joint: Commonly the result of a prior injury or inflammation to the ankle joint. Can be usually diagnosed with an examination and x-ray. 3-Osteochondritis dissecans of the talus: Chip type fracture that usually occurs with severe ankle sprains. Causes pain, swelling, and stiffness of the ankle joint. X-rays, Ct scan or MRI are commonly used for the diagnosis. 4-Tibialis anterior tendonitis 5-Anterior tibialis tendonitis: It is an overuse condition common in runners. Common injury that usually accompanies anterior shin splints. If this tendon is strained, pain and tenderness will be felt upon active dorsiflexion or when the tendon is touched. There are many structures present at the medial aspect of the ankle. These structures are often susceptible to injury. Common injuries and conditions around the medial ankle 1-Posterior tibial tendonitis or rupture: Posterior tibial tendon problems can occur from overuse activities, degeneration and trauma. The posterior tibial tendon is one of the major supporting structure of the foot. The tendon helps to keep the arch of the foot in its normal position. When there is insufficiency or rupture of the tendon, the arch begins to sag and a flatfoot deformity can occur with associated tight achilles tendon. This occurs distal to the medial malleolus. This area is hypovascular. It presents with painful swelling on the posteromedial aspect of the ankle. Patient is unable to perform a single leg toe raise. 2-Tarsal tunnel syndrome: It is compression of the tibial nerve in the tarsal tunnel. The flexor retinaculum covers the nerve. Tarsal tunnel syndrome is similar to compression of the median nerve in the carpal tunnel. Causes include ganglia, accessory muscle and soft tissue mass. 3-Flexor hallucis tendonitis: Pain, swelling, weakness posterior to the medial malleolus. Dorsiflexion of the big toe may be reduced when the ankle is placed in dorsiflexion. Triggering and pain along the tendon sheath may also occur with toe flexion. It often occurs in activities such as ballet dancing, in which plantar flexion is necessary. 4-Rupture of the deltoid ligament: The deltoid ligament are the primary stabilizers of the ankle joint. The deltoid ligaments provide support to prevent the ankle from everting. An isolated eversion sprain with tear of the deltoid ligaments is a rare injury. There are many structures present at the posterior aspect of the ankle. These structures are often susceptible to injury. Common injuries and conditions around the posterior ankle 1-Posterior ankle impingment (os trigonum): It is nonunited piece of accessory bone seen posterior to the talus. It is common among athletes such as ballet dancers. Tenderness in the posterolateral aspect of the ankle posterior to the peroneal tendon especially with passive plantar flexion. May be seen in association with flexor hallucis longus tenosynovitis. 2-flexor hallucis longus tenosynovitis: It is a condition associated with ballet dancing, in which extreme plantar flexion is necessary. Swelling and pain posterior to the medial malleoulus. Triggering with toe flexion. Dorsiflexion of the big toe is less when the ankle is dorsiflexed. 3-Achilles tendonitis: Irritation and inflammation due to overuse. Pain, swelling and tears within the tendon. Usually treated with therapy and injection. Do not inject inside the tendon, rarely treated with surgery. 4-Achilles tendon rupture: Achilles tendon can become prone to rupture with age lack of use, or by aggressive exercise. Rupture is diagnosed by the Thompson test and MRI. Treatment may be conservative without surgery by using a cast or a boot , however the rerupture rate is high. Surgery is done by approximation of the torn ends, however there is a risk of infection, skin and wound complications with surgery. There are many structures present at the lateral side of the ankle. These structures are often susceptible to injury. Diagnosis of these injuries can be confusing and many of these injuries can be missed.
Views: 494195 nabil ebraheim
Ankle Arthroscopy and Open Repair
 
05:39
Post-collision injury to talar dome cartilage and associated tear of peroneus brevis tendon. Arthroscopic shaving of joint cartilage defects and suture repair to tendon injuries.
Views: 88384 Trial FX
Ankle Palpation
 
04:48
https://www.p2sportscare.com/ankle-pain-runners/ Huntington Beach CA 714-502-4243 to learn prevention methods. We specialize in sports injuries and getting athletes back to their sports fast (running injuries, shoulder tendonitis, IT Band, Runners Knee, Hip Flexor tightness). We see athletes anywhere from baseball, triathletes, golfers, basketball, cyclist, runners and so on. We provide Active Release Techniques (ART), chiropractic care, strength training and corrective exercises. The Performance Place Sports Care is located in Huntington Beach, CA. 714-502-4243 Ankle impingement by an osseous growth, spur, can be the main source of pain with many biomechanical and functional movements. Anatomically the ankle is composed of three joints: talocrural joint, subtalar joint, and inferior tibiofibular joint. The ankle joint is special in that all surfaces of the joint are covered in articular cartilage, which can be a mechanical disadvantage if injured. Cartilage as a whole does not have neural or vascular supply, therefore any injury to the cartilage will not be able to heal properly. If enough cartilage damage is done to the level of the subchondral bone, an area of vascularity, it is possible that some of the articular cartilage may be healed with fibrocartilage. Although fibrocartilage indicates healing in the ankle joint, it has decreased biomechanical benefits and can lead to impingement. Typically articular cartialge will not induce pain, due to the lack of neural input. However, if pain is felt after the ankle swelling has reduced, it is likely the pain is referred from another source such as an osseous spur. The ankle joint is surrounded by many ligaments that hold all of the boney attachments together. Functionally speaking, the ankle is a joint of mobility and is the key player in determining the functionality for all the other major joints of the body. Athletes who have difficulty moving their ankle through ranges of motion or have pain upon movement can possibly have a restricted ankle joint, but the main cause is due to poor biomechanics from a previous overuse injury and fatiguing of the soft tissue. Among the ligaments found in the ankle, the strongest ligament of the ankle joint is the deltoid ligament, found on the inside. The other three ligaments, anterior and posterior talofibular ligaments, and calcaneofibular ligaments are found laterally and the area of insult with a classic inversion ankle sprain. Once the ankle is malpositioned, the ligaments become lax and unstable in efforts of preventing dysfunctional movement. Ankle sprains are usually caused by intense, repetitive movements applying too much pressure to the muscles and joints. The ankle is found to be most stable in the closed pack position, dorsiflexion, and most injuries are attained with plantar flexion. Running, ice skating, plyometric exercise are all activities with repetitive ankle motion and can lead to injury. When observing the ankle for motion, the patient may experience pain through the ranges of motion, which is a good indicator of an impingement and there is some sort of restriction in the soft tissue or in the joint. To fully diagnose a healed ankle with dyskinesis or pain imaging should also be considered in diagnosis to rule out any osseous fracture, joint degeneration, impingement from an osseous structure, or arthritis in the joint. The best source of imaging for the ankle joint is an arthroscopy. If a sprain is concluded another source of imaging would be a musculoskeletal ultrasound to further evaluate the scar tissue in the soft tissue preventing full range of motion in addition to pain upon exertion. Possible treatments for ankle impingement: - Active Release Technique - Graston - Eccentric rehabilitative exercises - Stretching - RICE (rest, ice, compress, elevate) - Surgery based on the severity of the tear to reattach the muscle tendon - Steroid injections - Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory medications ankle impingement, impingement of ankle, impingement syndrome, ankle pain, pinch in ankle, ankle sprain, sprained ankle, rolled ankle, ankle therapy, ankle treatment, ankle physiotherapy, physiotherapy, chiropractic, sports chiropractor, huntington beach chiropractor, physiotherapist, peroneal tendonitis, atfl, ligament tear, tibialis positerior, tibialis anterior
Views: 41360 Sebastian Gonzales
Lateral ankle sprain treatment & rehabilitation exercises video
 
09:18
For anyone suffering from an ankle sprain or twisted ankle this video from 2014 can help. Get 20% discount here by using discount code HAWKES on http://www.compex.com/uk Also check out NBA Basketball injuries and injury help here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLC9-VUb7hlQPT9DvnI6fvjM1jEBUiD6Pw Not sure if you have broken it? Check out this video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RJP9ws3cOvQ&list=PLC9-VUb7hlQM9W_wA2W_nzUGHi-ZKVVDy&index=4 Want more detail on how to treat a sprained ankle? Then watch this video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y6UbaLoGnBI The Playlist shows you how to treat it in the first few days all the way back to full fitness with advice and exercises. For more videos on injury click here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLC9-VUb7hlQM9W_wA2W_nzUGHi-ZKVVDy If you need an ankle support then here is a selection for you: http://go.magik.ly/ml/86x7/ http://go.magik.ly/ml/89j6/ http://go.magik.ly/ml/89j7/ please subscribe to the channel here: https://www.youtube.com/user/hawkesphysiotherapy We are also on Patreon, so if you would like to make a pledge and get more say in future content, the link is below: https://www.patreon.com/mathewhawkes Our Website: www.hawkesphysiotherapy.co.uk DISCLAIMER: The content in this video is provided for general information purposes only and is not meant to replace a physiotherapy or medical consultation.
Ankle Sprains Part 2: Symptoms & Evaluation
 
08:49
Learn more about our foot and ankle services: http://coordinatedhealth.com/services/foot-ankle/ Get to know Dr. Brigido: http://coordinatedhealth.com/team/stephen-brigido-dpm/ Visit our website to view the next part in this series: http://coordinatedhealth.com/news/video/ankle-sprains-part-3-rehab-protection/ More info: http://coordinatedhealth.com/news/video/ankle-sprains-part-2-symptoms-evaluation/ Dr. Stephen Brigido explains the different grades of ankle sprains and how that affects your recovery. He reviews the symptoms of several different types of ankle sprains as well as how he evaluates an ankle when he suspects a sprain. Dr. Emil DiIorio explains what an ankle sprain looks like on an X-ray and MRI. Part 2 of 3 Watch Part 3 next -- Learn what exercise are most important in physical therapy after an ankle sprain. www.coordinatedhealth.com (877) 247-8080 For more information, email: [email protected] Find more info at: http://www.coordinatedhealth.com/video/ankle-sprains-part-2-symptoms-evaluation
Views: 153278 Coordinated Health
Ankle Rehabilitation: Phase 1
 
08:02
A CHOP sports medicine physical therapist and a patient demonstrate the first phase in a home program to rehabilitate your foot or ankle following an injury. http://www.chop.edu/sportsPT
Medial Ankle Ligaments
 
03:17
Views: 111553 Catherine Blake
Massage Techniques : Massage Treatment Options for Ankle Ligament Sprains
 
03:48
If there is pain in your ankle due to fractures, sprains or torn ligaments, massage can help reduce it. Work your injured angle easier in this free video, with help from a licensed massage therapist. Expert: Nicole Aleskas Contact: www.TotalBodyHarmony.com Bio: Nicole Aleskas is a Licensed Massage Therapist MA 44513, affiliated with the AMTA and NCBTMB. Filmmaker: Christopher Rokosz Series Description: The proper massage technique can help reduce pain, increase relaxation and alleviate some diseases. Help someone live more comfortably with help from a licensed massage therapist in this free video.
Views: 77839 ehowhealth
Sports Foot and Ankle Injuries, Ankle Sprains, Ligament Strains, Yorkville, Sycamore, Oswego, Dekalb
 
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http://www.advancedfas.com/ Our patients in Yorkville, Sycamore and surrounding areas are active and ankle sprains happen. Sprains are caused by an unnatural twisting or force on the ankle bones of the foot, which may result in excessive stretching or tearing of one or more ligaments on the outside of the ankle. The severity of the sprain can impact the degree of damage as well as the type and duration of treatment. If not properly treated, ankle sprains may develop into long-term problems. Our patients in Yorkville, Plano, Sugar Grove, Aurora, Oswego, Bristol, Newark, Sandwich, Sugar Grove, Sycamore, Dekalb, Cortland, Burlington, Genoa, Virgil and Campton Hills who's primary symptoms of ankle sprains are pain following a twist or injury, swelling, and bruising come to us for a diagnosis, treatment and ability to get back out to being active. Call us today at: Advanced Foot & Ankle Surgeons, Inc Yorkville Office Phone: (630) 352-3700 Sycamore Office Phone: (815) 669-4811 An ankle sprain is a common injury and usually results when the ankle is twisted, or inverted. The term "sprain" signifies injury (below) to the soft tissues, usually the ligaments, of the ankle. An ankle sprain is a common injury and usually results when the ankle is twisted, or inverted. The term "sprain" signifies injury (below) to the soft tissues, usually the ligaments, of the ankle. Anatomy: A ligament is made up of multiple strands of tissue - similar to a nylon rope. A sprain results in tearing of the ligaments (right). The tear can be a complete tear of all the strands of the ligament or a partial tear, where a portion of the strands of the ligament are torn. The ligament is weakened by the injury - how much depends on the degree of the tear. The lateral ligaments (below) are by far the most commonly injured ligaments in a typical inversion injury of the ankle. On the lateral side of the ankle there are 3 ligaments (below) that make up the lateral ligament complex. These include the anterior talofibular ligament (ATF), posterior talofibular ligament (PTF) and the calcaneofibular ligament(CF) . The very common inversion injury to the ankle usually injures the calcaneofibular ligament and the talofibular ligament. The CF ligament keeps the ankle from rolling over on its side and the ATF ligament keeps the ankle from sliding forward. - Symptoms: Initially the ankle is swollen, painful, and may turn echymotic (bruised). The bruising, and the initial swelling, is due to ruptured blood vessels from the tearing of the soft tissues. Most of the initial swelling is actually bleeding (.avi movie) into the surrounding tissues. This initial swelling due to bleeding then increases due to edema fluid leaking into the tissues as well over the next 24 hours. - Our patients in Yorkville, Plano, Sugar Grove, Aurora, Oswego, Bristol, Newark, Sandwich, Sugar Grove, Sycamore, Dekalb, Cortland, Burlington, Genoa, Virgil and Campton Hills area come to our office in Yorkville or Sycamore for a solid diagnosis, great treatment and knowing they'll be back on the road to recovery!
How to treat an Ankle Inversion Sprain - Kinesiology Taping to stabilise ligaments
 
03:27
http://www.johngibbonsbodymaster.co.uk/courses/ John Gibbons is a sports Osteopath and a lecturer for the 'Bodymaster Method ®' and in this video he is demonstrating how to apply Kinesiology tape for a patient that presents with an Ankle Inversion sprain. Want to learn how to apply Athletic Tape as well as other Physical Therapy CPD Courses then look on http://www.johngibbonsbodymaster.co.uk John is also the Author of the highly successful book and Amazon No 1 best seller, called 'Muscle Energy Techniques, a practical guide for physical therapists'. John has also written 2 more books, one is called 'A Practical Guide to Kinesiology Taping' and this comes with a complimentary DVD and the other book is called; 'Vital Glutes, connecting the gait cycle to pain and dysfunction'. These 2 books are available to buy now through his website http://www.johngibbonsbodymaster.co.uk/books/ or from Amazon http://www.amazon.co.uk John now offers Advanced Training in all aspects of Sports Medicine to already qualified therapists in manual therapy to 'Diploma' Level. You need to have attended all of his Physical Therapy Courses before the diploma is awarded. His venue is based at the idylic venue of Oxford University, home of the first four-minute mile by Roger Bannister.
Views: 1066048 John Gibbons
THE BEST and coolest Kinesiology Taping for an Ankle inversion sprain
 
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http://www.johngibbonsbodymaster.co.uk John Gibbons is a registered Osteopath, Lecturer and Author and is demonstrating how to apply kinesiology tape using Rocktape for an ankle inversion sprain to stabilise the peroneals muscles and the ATFL and CFL ligaments (lateral ligaments) of the ankle. These techniques and more is taught on the Kinesiology taping Master-Class at the University of Oxford. John is also the Author of the highly successful book and Amazon No 1 best seller called 'Muscle Energy Techniques, a practical guide for physical therapists'.  John has also written 4 more books: 1.  A Practical Guide to Kinesiology Taping and comes with a complimentary DVD.  2. The Vital Glutes, connecting the gait cycle to pain and dysfunction. 3. Functional Anatomy of the Pelvis, lumbar and Sacroiliac joint. 4. The Vital Shoulder Complex, an illustrated guide to assessment, treatment and rehabilitation. All the books are available to buy now through his website http://www.johngibbonsbodymaster.co.uk... or from Amazon http://www.amazon.co.uk John now offers Advanced Training in all aspects of Sports Medicine to already qualified therapists in manual therapy to 'Diploma' Level. You need to have attended all of his ten individual Therapy Courses before the diploma is awarded. His venue is based at the idylic venue of Oxford University, home of the first four-minute mile by Roger Bannister.
Views: 33907 John Gibbons
Treatment for sprain ankle
 
01:32
Case study 2: Sports injury. Sprain ankle. 20yrs old female. Grade 1 sprain. Pain when plantar flex. Work on the achilles tendon and posterior/anterior talofibular ligament.
Views: 886 Orthopex Fitness
Ankle Ligaments Anatomy - Everything You Need To Know - Dr. Nabil Ebraheim
 
04:47
Dr. Ebraheim’s educational animated video describes the anatomy of the ankle ligaments. The ankle joint is made of three bones, the tibia, the fibula and the talus. The tibia is the major bone of the lower leg which bears the majority of the body weight. At the angle, the bump of the tibia forms the medial malleolus. The fibula is the smaller of the two bone of the leg. The lateral end of the fibula forms the lateral malleolus. In the ankle joint the talus articulates with the tibia. The talus is involved in multiple movements of the foot. There are ligaments in the ankle that provide connections between the bones. Injury to any of these ligaments may occur when the foot twists, rolls or turns beyond its normal motion. An ankle sprain is a common injury that occurs in sports as basketball and soccer. The deltoid ligament is on the medial side. It is formed of four parts: anterior tibiotalar part, tibionavicular part, tibiocalcaneal part and the posterior tibiotalar. The superficial deltoid arises from the anterior colliculus. The deep deltoid arises form the posterior colliculus and the intercollicular groove. The deltoid ligament is the main stabilizer of the ankle joint during the stance phase. The deltoid ligament is rarely injured by itself and it is usually associated with fractures. There are 3 lateral ligaments of the ankle joint: The anterior talofibular ligament (weakest): origin: 10 mm proximal to the tip of the fibula. Extends from the anterior inferior border of the fibula to the neck of the talus. The posterior talofibular ligament ( strongest): origin from the posterior border of the fibula. Inserts into posterolateral tubercle of the talus Calcaneofibular ligament: origin anterior border of the fibula 1 cm proximal to the distal tip. Inserts into the calcaneus distal to the subtalar joint and deep to the peroneal tendon sheath. The lateral ligaments are the most commonly injured ligaments in the ankle. The ligament of the syndesmosis •Anterior inferior tibiofibular ligament •Interosseous ligament •Posterior inferior tibiofibular ligament The connection of the tibia and fibula is called the syndesmosis. High ankle sprain = syndesmosis injury 5-10%. Injury of the ligaments above the ankle. Become a friend on facebook: http://www.facebook.com/drebraheim Follow me on twitter: https://twitter.com/#!/DrEbraheim_UTMC
Views: 74982 nabil ebraheim
Anterior Drawer Test of the Ankle | Chronic Ankle Laxity & Anterior Talofibular Ligament Rupture
 
03:14
Enroll in our online course: http://bit.ly/PTMSK DOWNLOAD OUR APP: 📱 iPhone/iPad: https://goo.gl/eUuF7w 🤖 Android: https://goo.gl/3NKzJX GET OUR ASSESSMENT BOOK ▶︎▶︎ http://bit.ly/GETPT ◀︎◀︎ This is not medical advice. The content is intended as educational content for health care professionals and students. If you are a patient, seek care of a health care professional. The anterior drawer test has limited diagnostic ability for chronic ankle laxity but performs well in an acute situation to diagnose ruptures of the anterior talofibular ligament commonly injured after ankle inversion trauma  HELP TRANSLATE THIS VIDEO  If you liked this video, help people in other countries enjoy it too by creating subtitles for it. Spread the love and impact. Here is how to do it: https://youtu.be/b9cKgwnFIAw  SUPPORT US  : http://bit.ly/SPPRTPT  ARTICLES: Croy (2013): https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24175608 Van Dijk (1996): https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9065068 Miller (2016): https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26660862 Visit our Website: http://bit.ly/web_PT Like us on Facebook: http://bit.ly/like_PT Follow on Instagram: http://bit.ly/IG_PT Follow on Twitter: http://bit.ly/Tweet_PT Snapchat: http://bit.ly/Snap_PT
Views: 113609 Physiotutors
Inner Ankle Pain Instructional - Huntington Beach
 
02:51
https://www.p2sportscare.com/ankle-pain-runners/ Huntington Beach CA 714-502-4243 to learn prevention methods. We specialize in sports injuries and getting athletes back to their sports fast (running injuries, shoulder tendonitis, IT Band, Runners Knee, Hip Flexor tightness). We see athletes anywhere from baseball, triathletes, golfers, basketball, cyclist, runners and so on. We provide Active Release Techniques (ART), chiropractic care, strength training and corrective exercises. The Performance Place Sports Care is located in Huntington Beach, CA. 714-502-4243 Ankle impingement by an osseous growth, spur, can be the main source of pain with many biomechanical and functional movements. Anatomically the ankle is composed of three joints: talocrural joint, subtalar joint, and inferior tibiofibular joint. The ankle joint is special in that all surfaces of the joint are covered in articular cartilage, which can be a mechanical disadvantage if injured. Cartilage as a whole does not have neural or vascular supply, therefore any injury to the cartilage will not be able to heal properly. If enough cartilage damage is done to the level of the subchondral bone, an area of vascularity, it is possible that some of the articular cartilage may be healed with fibrocartilage. Although fibrocartilage indicates healing in the ankle joint, it has decreased biomechanical benefits and can lead to impingement. Typically articular cartialge will not induce pain, due to the lack of neural input. However, if pain is felt after the ankle swelling has reduced, it is likely the pain is referred from another source such as an osseous spur. The ankle joint is surrounded by many ligaments that hold all of the boney attachments together. Functionally speaking, the ankle is a joint of mobility and is the key player in determining the functionality for all the other major joints of the body. Athletes who have difficulty moving their ankle through ranges of motion or have pain upon movement can possibly have a restricted ankle joint, but the main cause is due to poor biomechanics from a previous overuse injury and fatiguing of the soft tissue. Among the ligaments found in the ankle, the strongest ligament of the ankle joint is the deltoid ligament, found on the inside. The other three ligaments, anterior and posterior talofibular ligaments, and calcaneofibular ligaments are found laterally and the area of insult with a classic inversion ankle sprain. Once the ankle is malpositioned, the ligaments become lax and unstable in efforts of preventing dysfunctional movement. Ankle sprains are usually caused by intense, repetitive movements applying too much pressure to the muscles and joints. The ankle is found to be most stable in the closed pack position, dorsiflexion, and most injuries are attained with plantar flexion. Running, ice skating, plyometric exercise are all activities with repetitive ankle motion and can lead to injury. When observing the ankle for motion, the patient may experience pain through the ranges of motion, which is a good indicator of an impingement and there is some sort of restriction in the soft tissue or in the joint. To fully diagnose a healed ankle with dyskinesis or pain imaging should also be considered in diagnosis to rule out any osseous fracture, joint degeneration, impingement from an osseous structure, or arthritis in the joint. The best source of imaging for the ankle joint is an arthroscopy. If a sprain is concluded another source of imaging would be a musculoskeletal ultrasound to further evaluate the scar tissue in the soft tissue preventing full range of motion in addition to pain upon exertion. Possible treatments for ankle impingement: - Active Release Technique - Graston - Eccentric rehabilitative exercises - Stretching - RICE (rest, ice, compress, elevate) - Surgery based on the severity of the tear to reattach the muscle tendon - Steroid injections - Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory medications ankle impingement, impingement of ankle, impingement syndrome, ankle pain, pinch in ankle, ankle sprain, sprained ankle, rolled ankle, ankle therapy, ankle treatment, ankle physiotherapy, physiotherapy, chiropractic, sports chiropractor, huntington beach chiropractor, physiotherapist, peroneal tendonitis, atfl, ligament tear, tibialis positerior, tibialis anterior
Views: 46113 Sebastian Gonzales
Deltoid ligament of the ankle test
 
00:44
Test for presence of injury to the deltoid ligament. The test is positive if eversion is painful with palpable tenderness over the deltoid ligament. A positive test indicates a sprained deltoid ligament. To find out more about our work and the full range of our publications please visit our website: http://www.clinicalexams.co.uk/ The complete videos can be streamed or downloaded from our Vimeo site: https://vimeo.com/user21235595/vod_pages Excerpts and free video clips can be found on our YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCyG7qeIHTBGlJqNrBi-_1NA/videos?view_as=public&shelf_id=1&view=0&sort=dd Bloomsbury Educational Limited 97 Judd Street, London, WC1H 9JB http://www.clinicalexams.co.uk/ Please subscribe to our channel to benefit from new additions. DISCLAIMER Bloomsbury Educational will not be held responsible or liable for any kind of loss or injury incurred as a result of the information conveyed in our videos. All procedures must be practiced in a supervised professional clinical setting. Andreas Syrimis, Bloomsbury Educational Limited.
Ankle Sprain Fix and Prevention (IMPROVES SQUAT TOO!)
 
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Build strong ankles and build ripped athletic muscle in 90 days http://athleanx.com/x/be-built-like-an-athlete Ankle sprains are one of the most common injuries suffered by athletes and non-athletes alike. The problem with them is that they not only recur more frequently than any other injury but they make it very hard to lift with proper form. Doing squats and deadlifts become especially difficult if you lack the range of motion and mobility needed in your ankle to get down low enough. If you lack the dorsiflexion needed in your ankle to do this properly, you wind up causing compensatory pain and injury in the knees or hips. In this video, I show you three ways you can improve the mobility of your ankle using just a single x-treme band from ATHLEAN-X. You want to start by working on the easiest motion to restore and that is the talocrural joint movement. You can do this by anchoring a band behind your tibia, making sure to keep it higher up than your ankle. As you lean into a lunge, the pull of the band should pull your tibia forward and help improve the ability of the talus to move backwards and improve dorsiflexion. You can take the focus a little bit lower and try to improve the motion of the subtalar joint as an alternative. To do this you would want to anchor the band in front of your ankle and low. You have to be sure that your band is crossing the talus and is not too high as to land on the tibia. Here you want to try and glide the talus backwards as you slide your calcaneus or heel forward. You can do this by trying to drive your heel into the ground as you lean forward into the lunge. The final option is one that is incredibly effective for those who have sprained their ankle or suffer from recurring ankle sprains. When this happens, the fibular head is often the reason. It is almost always found that it has displaced forward which creates less room for the talus to move freely within the talocrural joint. It is literally jamming the space that once was there that allowed your ankle to move freely. To fix this you want to place a band around your ankle and over the fibular head (the bump on the outside of your ankle that you can feel). You pull hard with the outside hand to help glide the head of the fibula backwards as you lean into the movement and create dorsiflexion. This is an important component move of the ankle that chronic ankle sprainers lose and it winds up causing them to be susceptible to additional sprained ankles in the future. You can see that there are a lot of ways to go about fixing a sprained ankle by improving the mobility of the ankle. The best part about these drills is that they are not only fast to do but often produce immediate results by improving ankle range of motion and decreasing pain. Even if you have an acute ankle sprain, you may find that doing this gives you a lot more range in your ankle and allows you to move the joint with much less discomfort or restriction. For a complete program that helps you to build a ripped athletic body by training like an athlete, be sure to head to http://athleanx.com and get the ATHLEAN-X Training System. Too many people approach their training too haphazardly to see significant injury free results. If you want to take your training to the next level, then you want to start taking your training seriously. For more videos on how to fix ankle sprains as well as other mobility drills for improving shoulder and elbow range of motion, be sure to subscribe to our channel on youtube at http://youtube.com/user/jdcav24
Views: 514672 ATHLEAN-X™
Lateral Sprained Ankle Stretches & Exercises - Ask Doctor Jo
 
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Lateral ankle sprains can be very painful and cause your ankle to become unstable. These stretches and exercises should help the healing process. See Doctor Jo’s blog post about this at: http://www.askdoctorjo.com/lateral-sprained-ankle The first stretch will be a calf stretch. Start off with your legs out in front of you. You can bend up the leg you aren’t using towards you in a comfortable position. Keep the leg you want to stretch out in front of you. Take a stretch strap, dog leash, belt, or towel and wrap it around the ball of your foot. Relax your foot, and pull the strap towards you stretching your calf muscle. You should feel the stretch under your leg. Hold the stretch for 30 seconds, and do three of them. Now prop your ankle up on a roll or hang your foot off the bed or table so your heel doesn't touch the floor. Put the band around the ball of your foot for good resistance. First, push your foot down and up. This is called ankle plantarflexion. Next you are going to cross your foot over the foot with the band as seen in the video, and pull your foot inward. This is ankle inversion. Now you want to wrap the band around your other foot. This time you will have resistance pulling out. This is ankle eversion. The next exercise will be standing up. You want to lean against a wall or something sturdy. Place the foot you want to stretch behind you. Make sure to keep your heel down and your toes forward pointing towards the wall. With the other foot in front of you, like you are in a lunge position, bend your knee towards the wall until you feel a stretch through your back leg. Try to keep your back leg as straight as possible. Hold the stretch for 30 seconds, and do it three times. Now is a heel raise off the ground. Stand with your feet about shoulder width apart, come up on your toes as high as you can. Try not to lean forward, but bring your body straight up and slowly come back down. Push off as much as you can so your heel leaves the ground. Start off with ten and work your way up to 20-25. The last exercise will be a balance series. Stand on one foot, but hold onto something sturdy. Try to balance for 30 seconds to a minute. When that becomes easy, just use one finger one each side. Then just one finger for balance, and finally try balancing without holding on at all. Related Videos: Sprained Ankle Treatment with Ankle/Foot AROM: https://youtu.be/UYM-_k_dWZw?list=PLPS8D21t0eO9JGYS958XUh2mkV8Sa2sAq Sprained Ankle - How to Wrap an Ankle Sprain: https://youtu.be/BPbUH4rdKPo?list=PLPS8D21t0eO9JGYS958XUh2mkV8Sa2sAq =========================================== SUBSCRIBE for More Videos: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=askdoctorjo ======================================= Doctor Jo is a Doctor of Physical Therapy. http://www.AskDoctorJo.com http://www.facebook.com/AskDoctorJo http://www.pinterest.com/AskDoctorJo https://www.instagram.com/AskDoctorJo http://www.twitter.com/AskDoctorJo http://plus.google.com/+AskDoctorJo ======================================= Lateral Sprained Ankle Stretches & Exercises: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3JJayVC0-20 DISCLAIMER: This content (the video, description, links, and comments) is not medical advice or a treatment plan and is intended for general education and demonstration purposes only. This content should not be used to self-diagnose or self-treat any health, medical, or physical condition. Don’t use this content to avoid going to your own healthcare professional or to replace the advice they give you. Consult with your healthcare professional before doing anything contained in this content. You agree to indemnify and hold harmless Ask Doctor Jo, LLC and its officers for any and all losses, injuries, or damages resulting from any and all claims that arise from your use or misuse of this content. Ask Doctor Jo, LLC makes no representations about the accuracy or suitability of this content. Use of this content is at your sole risk.
Views: 127982 AskDoctorJo
Lateral Ankle Sprain
 
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Dr Donald A Ozello DC of Championship Chiropractic in Las Vegas, NV is the author of "Running: Maximize Performance & Minimize Injuries." He can be found on the web at http://www.championshipchiropractic.com Dr Ozello's Sports Medicine Report is a weekly video that covers a different injury or body part each episode. Dr Ozello describes the anatomy and mechanism of injury in detail. He provides information on the intrinsic and extrinsic factors of the injury and discusses prevention and rehabilitation strategies to remove the sources of the condition. A playlist is available with videos demonstrating exercises & rehabilitation techniques. "Running: Maximize Performance & Minimize Injuries" is available in paperback & ebook. https://www.amazon.com/dp/1493618741/... Serious ankle sprains may possess long-term sequelae. If not healed properly, ankle sprains commonly recur. A serious ankle sprain can be worse than a broken bone because bones grow back stronger while an injured ligament may not heal completely. Ligaments are connective tissues made of tough collagen fibers that attach bones to other bones. Ligaments provide support & stabilize joints by preventing excessive motion. The most common location of ankle sprains is the outer or lateral region. Eighty percent of ankle sprains take place in the lateral area. Strong ligaments attach the bone of the lower leg to several bones in the foot. The ligaments of the lateral ankle function by preventing excessive inward turning of the ankle, or inversion. Three ligaments attach the lower aspect of the fibula to the foot. The anterior talofibular ligament, calcaneofibular ligament & posterior talofibular ligament. Most ankle sprains occur to the anterior talofibular ligament or calcaneofibular ligament. Sprains are injuries to ligaments. Sprains are classified according to severity. Mild (Grade 1) Stretching & microscopic tearing. Grade 2 (moderate) Partial tear. Grade 3 (Severe) Complete rupture. In most cases, a lateral ankle sprain occurs traumatically when the athlete’s ankle twists or turns to a larger degree than the ligaments would normally move. Traumatic ankle sprains usually occur when the runner is on uneven ground or an unsteady surface. Traumatic ankle sprains are one of the most common sports injuries. Lateral ankle sprains can occur or recur in a non-traumatic fashion. Non-traumatic ankle sprains develop from overuse, poor training technique, incorrect lower leg biomechanics, poor proprioception & incomplete healing of a prior ankle sprain. Correct these contributing factors to lessen & prevent the occurrence & recurrence of non-traumatic ankle sprains. Symptoms of traumatic ankle sprains begin immediately. Sharp pain is felt instantly. Followed by lack of motion, limited strength, inability to bear weight, swelling & bruising. Symptoms of a severe ankle sprain may persist for months. Symptoms of non-traumatic ankle sprains usually begin insidiously. Symptoms are described as a deep, dull ache that is tender to the touch & increases with walking, running & standing, or with foot & ankle motions. Localized ankle swelling may persist for months. If a lateral or medial ankle sprain occurred in the past, the ligaments might not have healed properly. Improper ligament healing leads to joint instability or a feeling of the ankle weakness or a sensation of “giving way.” A prior ankle sprain that did not heal properly or completely is the major intrinsic factor in the recurrence of the injury. Effective ankle rehabilitation may be long & tedious. Ligaments take time to heal completely & properly. Prevent recurrences by providing your ankle the tools & time it needs to heal properly. Your patience will pay off in the long run. Execute a comprehensive rehab program for optimal results. A detailed ankle rehabilitation program includes motion, strengthening, stabilizing & proprioception exercises. Pay close attention to your ankle before, during & after Training. Never attempt to push through pain when returning from an ankle sprain. Ankle injuries are common. Train smart & listen to your body to prevent & better rehab ankle sprains. Dr Donald A Ozello DC wishes you success in life and in your athletic endeavors. Train hard, train smart, stay injury free and accomplish your goals.
Ankle Joint Anatomy Explained: Bones, Joints, Ligaments, Tendons- Anterior, Posterior
 
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Source: https://www.epainassist.com Everything About Ankle Joint Anatomy- Know About Its Bones, Joints, Ligaments, Tendons- Anterior, Posterior. This video provides you information about Ankle Joint Anatomy Explained: Bones, Joints, Ligaments, Tendons- Anterior, Posterior Ankle Joint Anatomy Explained! The ankle is made up of bones, muscles, ligaments and tendons that support the weight of your body and allows the individual to move in day to day life. The ankle joint is made up of three bones; the fibula and tibia (shin bone) of the leg, and the talus of the foot. The fibula and tibia are bound together by tibiofibular ligaments. The bony bumps or protrusions seen and felt on the ankle have their own names: The bony bump felt on the inside of your ankle is part of the tibia's base is medial malleolus. The bony protrusion felt on the back of your ankle is also part of the tibia's base is known as posterior malleolus. The bony bump on the outside of your ankle is the low end of the fibula is called as lateral malleolus. The ankle joint allows up-and-down motion of our foot. The subtalar joint below the ankle joint allows a side-to-side movement of the foot. There are some numerous ligaments that are made of tough and moveable tissue surround the true ankle and subtalar joints, which bind the bones of the leg to each other and to those of the foot. The ankle and foot are very complex with a variety of connecting bones, tendons, ligaments, and muscles. Ankle Ligaments: In human anatomy, there are several strong bands of connective tissues called ligaments, which hold the bones of the ankles together. They include the following: Lateral collateral ligaments connect the fibula to the calcaneus and provide stability to the outsides of the ankles. Anterior tibiofibular ligament connects the tibia to the fibula. Deltoid ligaments attach the tibia to the talus and calcaneus and gives stability to the insides of the ankles. Ankle Tendons: There are several tendons that run through the ankle, which attach the muscles of lower leg to the bones of the foot and ankle. Some major tendons include as follows: •Flexor hallicus longus attaches to the big toe and runs along the inside of the ankle. •Achilles tendon attaches the calf muscle and calcaneus bone. •Flexor digitorum attaches to the other toes and runs along the inside of the ankle. •Peroneal tendons is a set of three tendons that run along the outside of the ankle. Watch Related Videos for Health Information: Causes of Ankle Joint Pain: Bursitis, Sprain, Tendonitis, Dislocation, Fracture : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jwMJ3kWhRWY&t=35s Exercises for Ankle Joint Ligament Injury & It's Recovery Period : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eVSC8eIP72M&t=33s Ankle Joint Arthroscopy-Therapeutic : Ankle Arthroscopic Surgery, Examination, Treatment : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7Kv736zBO98&t=60s Related Articles: Understanding Ankle Joint: http://www.epainassist.com/joint-pain/ankle-pain/understanding-ankle-joint-know-about-the-supporting-ligaments-tendons-muscles Causes Of Ankle Joint Pain: http://www.epainassist.com/question-and-answer/ankle-joint-pain-7-major-medical-conditions-that-can-cause-ankle-joint-pain Ankle Joint Ligament Injury: http://www.epainassist.com/sports-injuries/ankle-injuries/ankle-joint-ligament-injury Ankle Joint Tendonitis or Tendinitis: http://www.epainassist.com/joint-pain/ankle-pain/ankle-joint-tendonitis-or-tendinitis Ankle Joint Fracture or Broken Ankle: http://www.epainassist.com/joint-pain/ankle-pain/ankle-joint-fracture-or-broken-ankle Ankle Joint Sprain: http://www.epainassist.com/joint-pain/ankle-pain/ankle-joint-sprain
Views: 52480 ePainAssist
Ankle joint: bones and ligaments (preview) - Human Anatomy | Kenhub
 
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The ankle joint is a very important synovial joint found on the lower limb. There are lots of bones and ligaments involved in this joint, so check out the full version of this video to learn everything about it: https://khub.me/rqedl Oh, are you struggling with learning anatomy? We created the ★ Ultimate Anatomy Study Guide ★ to help you kick some gluteus maximus in any topic. Completely free. Download yours today: https://khub.me/llm1c The leg which is the part of the lower limb between the knee joint and the ankle joint has two bones. The larger bone which is commonly referred to as the shin bone is the tibia. The tibia is the medial of the two bones of the leg. At the distal end of the tibia, there is a bony projection on the medial side. This is called the medial malleolus. You can actually palpate and see the medial malleolus on your own ankle. There is another bone on the lateral side of the leg, which is the fibula. This bone is much more slender than the tibia. Well, the fibula is not directly involved in weight transmission though, it is involved in the ankle joint. And similar to the tibia, the fibula also has a distal bony projection or malleolus. In the full version of this tutorial, we will: - first identify the bones involved in the ankle joints; - then we'll look at the joint itself; - lastly identify the ligaments that hold these bones together; - and to finish off, we'll look at some clinical correlations of the ankle joint. To master this topic, click on the link and carry on watching the full video (available to Premium members): https://khub.me/rqedl ! Want to test your knowledge on the anatomy of the ankle joint? Take this quiz: https://khub.me/hdo3j Read more on the bones and ligaments of the ankle joint on this complete article https://khub.me/vqgj2 For more engaging video tutorials, interactive quizzes, articles and an atlas of Human anatomy and histology, go to https://khub.me/ss6i3
Foot and Ankle Compression Wrap
 
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OVERVIEW: This compression wrap is great to help reduce or prevent further swelling to the foot ankle and lower leg. This can be utilized for a plethora of injuries including but not limited to a lateral ankle sprain, medial ankle sprain, high ankle sprain, mid-foot sprain, lower leg contusion or strain. There is an optional horseshoe that can be placed around the lateral or medial malleolus to assist in edema reduction. ANATOMY: A lateral ankle sprain can either occur to the ATFL (anterior talofibular ligament), CFL (calcaneal fibular ligament), or the PTFL (posterior talofibular ligament). When a person sprains their ankle it is more common to the ATFL. The ankle has inert and contractile support. Muscle strains to the peroneal/ fibularis muscles can also occur simultaneously with an ankle sprain. Each joint in the body has surrounding muscles for additional support and for the ankle they are the Fibularis Tertius, Longus and Brevis. The Fibularis Longus and Brevis assist the ankle in plantar flexion and eversion. The Fibularis Tertius' action is to dorsiflex and evert the ankle joint. If the medial structures are involved, the deltoid ligament may be the first structure that comes to mind. Not as common as the ATFL but an injury to the deltoid ligament and also occur. Structures injured with a high ankle sprain include the syndesmosis and the anterior tibiofibular ligament. The syndesmosis is the connective tissue between the fibula and tibia in the lower leg. The anterior tibiofibular ligament connects the distal tibia and fibula together. The ATFL and syndesmosis help prevent the tibia and fibula separating especially when the ankle is in a dorsiflexed position. MECHANISM OF INJURY: For a lateral ankle injury to occur the ankle joint is forced into a plantarflexed and inverted position. This position puts the most stress on the lateral structures of the ankle. For a medial ankle sprain, the foot will be forced into a dorsiflexed and everted position (which puts stress on the deltoid ligament). A high ankle sprain can have the same mechanism of a medial ankle sprain but the structures involved are the anterior tibiofibular ligament and the syndesmosis. *A pdf document with step by step instructions with specific materials needed can be found on the The University of West Alabama (UWA) athletic training page* http://at.uwa.edu
Views: 15 R.T. Floyd
Exercises for Ankle Joint Ligament Injury & It's Recovery Period
 
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For the Ankle Joint Ligament Injury to heal completely and in the fastest possible time, it is imperative to do the following exercises, which is shown in the video diligently. In post ankle joint ligament injury, there is substantial swelling and reduced range of motion of the ankle. Learn about the exercises and recovery time for ankle joint ligament injury. Also Read: https://www.epainassist.com/sports-injuries/ankle-injuries/ankle-joint-ligament-injury Follow us: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Epainassistcom-370683123050810/?ref=hl Twitter: https://twitter.com/ePainAssist G+: https://plus.google.com/+Epainassist Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/epainassist
Views: 68835 ePainAssist
KT Tape: Distal Posterior Tibial Tendonitis
 
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The posterior tibial tendon serves as one of the most important supporting structures for the foot. It runs behind the ankle bone on the inside of the foot, across the instep, and connects to the bottom of the foot. It is crucial in the function of walking and running and helps to build the arch of the foot. A condition called Posterior Tibial Tendon Dysfunction (PTTD) is a breakdown or change in this tendon that causes flat feet. Irritation and overuse can cause the area behind the ankle bone to become inflamed and painful. Other symptoms of tendonitis in this tendon are pain at the instep, swelling along the tendon, general weakness in the ankle, or flattened feet. Knots can form in the tendon due to scar tissue and have the possibility of eventually rupturing. This makes it very important to relieve the stress and cause of inflammation as soon as possible. Standing, walking, or running for long periods of time, degeneration of the tendon due to age, obesity, poor nutrition, traumatic injury, and severe overuse can all contribute to problems with this tendon. Rest, massage, anti-inflammatory medication, and arch supports are non-surgical treatments used to help relieve the stress and continued degradation of the tendon. KT Tape provides much needed support and relief for the tendon. Increased blood flow to the area will help to provide nutrients and healing agents to the inflamed areas, as well as help to "cool" them down. During the healing process KT Tape will relieve the inevitable stress most individuals continue to put on their feet. Recovery times can be dramatically reduced and compensation injuries can be avoided when the pain relief is combined with support.
Views: 554995 KT Tape
Peroneal Tendonitis: Causes, Diagnosis, and Treatment
 
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Peroneal Tendonitis is associated with pain to the outside region of the foot and ankle following the course of the peroneal tendons. Peroneal Tendonitis is most commonly seen in people with history of ankle sprains and people with Pes Cavus, or high arch. A stable shoe with a wide base of support is reduces the potential tendency to have the heel bone invert or turn in. A orthotic with a valgus post inside the supportive shoe will further prevent the tendency for the foot to turn in reduces tension in the Peroneal Tendon. Visit SLO Motion Shoes for all your footwear and orthotic needs for peroneal tendonitis and many other lower extremity conditions. slomotionshoes.com
Views: 422682 SLO Motion Shoes
LIGAMENTS OF THE KNEE
 
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The knee is the largest joint in the human body. It is a compound joint. Not only is it where the femur, or thigh bone, meets the tibia, or shin bone – at the tibiofemoral joint, but it is also where the femur meets the patella, or kneecap – at the patellofemoral joint. There are several ligaments around the knee joint and these are crucial because they limit movements and stabilize the joint. Ligaments are durable bands of fibrous tissue that connect joints and strengthen them. There are two main pairs of ligaments in the knee – the cruciate ligaments, which are inside your knee joint, and the collateral ligaments, which run on either side of the knee. The cruciate ligaments can be seen through the intercondylar notch of the femur. There’s the anterior cruciate ligament, or ACL, and the posterior cruciate ligament, or PCL, which stabilize the knee. The ACL prevents the tibia from being pushed forward relative to the femur, while the PCL prevents it from being pushed backwards relative to the femur. Now for the collateral ligaments – there’s a medial collateral ligament and a lateral collateral ligament. Medial means at the middle, while lateral means on the side. Hence, the medial collateral ligament is found on the inner side of the knee, running from the femur to the tibia. The lateral collateral ligament is found on the outer side of the knee, however, it runs from the femur to the fibula! Note that the medial collateral ligament is significantly wider than the lateral collateral ligament. Together, the medial and lateral collateral ligaments resist sideways movements of the bones relative to one another. Looking back inside the intercondylar notch, we can see the transverse ligament – otherwise called the anterior meniscomeniscal ligament. This ligament connects the anterior lateral meniscus to the anterior medial meniscus. This ligament is important during knee extension, since it prevents the anterior horns of the menisci from coming forward, which would cause the condyles of the femur and tibia to put pressure on them. A ligament discovered in 2013 is the anterolateral ligament, or ALL. It originates at the femur and inserts into the tibia. It is thought that it might control internal tibial rotation. Here we have the ligament of Wrisberg, also called the posterior meniscofemoral ligament. This ligament attaches to the posterior lateral meniscus and crosses behind the PCL to attach to the medial condyle of the femur. Now I’d like to bring your attention to a structure that some call a tendon, and some call a ligament. As a reminder, the difference between ligaments and tendons is that ligaments connect bones to bones, while tendons connect bones to muscles. Here we have the patellar tendon… which some people call the patellar ligament. The patellar tendon connects the patella (or kneecap) to the tibia. Since these are two bones, shouldn’t it be a ligament? Well, this structure is really connecting the quadriceps muscle to the tibia. The patellar tendon is part of a more extensive mechanism, which includes the tibia, the patellar tendon, the patella, the quadriceps tendon, and the quadriceps muscle. Together, these structures allow you to straighten your knee. As a side note, the patella is what is known as a floating sesamoid bone. A sesamoid is a bone embedded in a tendon. To close off, I just want to bring your attention to a couple of other structures visible in this model. The medial and lateral menisci are composed of connective tissue with extensive collagen fibers. They protect the ends of the bones from rubbing against each other. Similarly to the collateral ligaments, the medial one is on the inner side of your knee and the lateral one is on the outer side of your knee. We can also see the articular cartilage on this model. This smooth, white tissue covers the ends of bones where they converge at joints, minimizing friction and allowing bones to glide over each other. As you get older, the articular cartilage and the menisci wear down, exposing underlying bone. This changes the load distribution and biomechanics of your knee and causes pain and inflammation as your bones grind together. 3D model modified from https://www.turbosquid.com/FullPreview/Index.cfm/ID/1123337
Views: 3788 Neural Academy
Ankle Sprain and Fibula Treatment
 
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Brandon Masi Parker discusses the osteopathic approach to a sprained ankle, the common lower extremity compensation after a trauma and treatment of the fibular head.
Views: 38865 Didactics Online
Cuboid Syndrome | Chronic Lateral Ankle Pain
 
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Enroll in our online course: http://bit.ly/PTMSK DOWNLOAD OUR APP: 📱 iPhone/iPad: https://goo.gl/eUuF7w 🤖 Android: https://goo.gl/3NKzJX GET OUR ASSESSMENT BOOK ▶︎▶︎ http://bit.ly/GETPT ◀︎◀︎ This is not medical advice. The content is intended as educational content for health care professionals and students. If you are a patient, seek care of a health care professional. GET OUR ASSESSMENT BOOK ▶︎▶︎ http://bit.ly/GETPT ◀︎◀︎ 🚨 HELP TRANSLATE THIS VIDEO 🚨 If you liked this video, help people in other countries enjoy it too by creating subtitles for it. Spread the love and impact. Here is how to do it: https://youtu.be/b9cKgwnFIAw The cuboid syndrome is hypothesized to occur secondary to lateral ankle sprain and can result in chronic ankle pain 👉🏼 SUPPORT THIS CHANNEL 😊 : http://bit.ly/SPPRTPT 👈🏼 📚 ARTICLES: Jennings 2005: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16108581 Visit our Website: http://bit.ly/web_PT Like us on Facebook: http://bit.ly/like_PT Follow on Instagram: http://bit.ly/IG_PT Follow on Twitter: http://bit.ly/Tweet_PT Snapchat: http://bit.ly/Snap_PT
Views: 33218 Physiotutors
Knee Pain Relief [Lateral/Outside Knee]: Quick Results for Long Term Gains
 
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This video shows how to most effectively use a simple tool (foam roller) to help relieve lateral knee pain. Exercise demonstration starts: 1:42 The most common cause of outside/lateral knee pain is due to ITBFS (Iliotibial Band Friction Syndrome). Training volume issues, as well as biomechanical problems, have been related to ITBFS. Of course, your health professional will be able to diagnose your symptoms most accurately and help you clear out more serious causes of pain including problems to do with the knee meniscus, osteoarthritis, muscle tendinopathy issues or referred pain from the low back. When working on the ITB, it is important to note that the structure itself is mainly non-contractile (non-muscle-like), so it is best to work on the muscles that give rise to ITB. These muscles are your TFL (Tensor Fascia Lata) and Gluteus Maximus muscles. There is also a muscle which lays directly underneath the length of the ITB which is called Vastus Lateralis. This muscle is the most lateral quadriceps muscle. Using a foam roller to the TFL, Gluteus Maximus and the Vastus Lateralis helps with lateral knee pain relief temporarily, which gives you an opportunity to work on those rehab exercises shown by your health professional. Remember that the soft tissue work itself doesn't do much to 'fix' the cause of your problem. However, used wisely in conjunction with good corrective movement exercise, can help you recover from pain and minimise the risk of recurrence. Please visit www.goodmovephysio.com.au to get in contact with the physiotherapist.
Views: 33166 Good Move Physio
Peroneal Tendonitis Stretches & Exercises – Ask Doctor Jo
 
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Peroneal tendonitis, or ankle tendonitis, is the inflammation of a tendon in your outer (lateral) ankle. The peroneal muscles run down the back of the lower leg, and the tendon runs behind the bump on your outer ankle (lateral malleolus). When the tendon is irritated, it can cause swelling on the outer ankle and ankle pain when walking or exercising. These peroneal tendonitis stretches and exercises should help. More ankle stretches https://youtu.be/g-iXYapbuqk?list=PLPS8D21t0eO9JGYS958XUh2mkV8Sa2sAq Related Videos: Lateral Sprained Ankle Stretches & Exercises https://youtu.be/3JJayVC0-20?list=PLPS8D21t0eO9JGYS958XUh2mkV8Sa2sAq Sprained Ankle Treatment with Ankle/Foot AROM: https://youtu.be/UYM-_k_dWZw?list=PLPS8D21t0eO9JGYS958XUh2mkV8Sa2sAq =========================================== SUPPORT me on Patreon for as little as $1 a month, and get cool rewards: http://www.patreon.com/askdoctorjo SUBSCRIBE for More Videos: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=askdoctorjo ======================================= Doctor Jo is a Doctor of Physical Therapy. http://www.AskDoctorJo.com http://www.facebook.com/AskDoctorJo http://www.pinterest.com/AskDoctorJo https://www.instagram.com/AskDoctorJo http://www.twitter.com/AskDoctorJo http://plus.google.com/+AskDoctorJo ======================================= Peroneal Tendonitis Stretches & Exercises: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gzw7zufAiw0 DISCLAIMER: This content (the video, description, links, and comments) is not medical advice or a treatment plan and is intended for general education and demonstration purposes only. This content should not be used to self-diagnose or self-treat any health, medical, or physical condition. Don’t use this content to avoid going to your own healthcare professional or to replace the advice they give you. Consult with your healthcare professional before doing anything contained in this content. You agree to indemnify and hold harmless Ask Doctor Jo, LLC and its officers for any and all losses, injuries, or damages resulting from any and all claims that arise from your use or misuse of this content. Ask Doctor Jo, LLC makes no representations about the accuracy or suitability of this content. Use of this content is at your sole risk.
Views: 102739 AskDoctorJo
Causes of Ligament Tears | Knee Exercises
 
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Watch more How to Do Physical Therapy Exercises for the Knees videos: http://www.howcast.com/videos/510332-Causes-of-Ligament-Tears-Knee-Exercises The cause of ligament tears is pretty simple. It's almost always going to involve some sort of a traumatic event. The ligaments in your knee are fairly strong by nature. They're thick. There are two ligaments that run on the outside of your knee called your medial collateral ligament and your lateral collateral ligament. Then you have two ligaments on the inside of your knee called your ACL and PCL, or anterior cruciate ligament and your posterior cruciate ligament. So you have four ligaments that are there to support you knee. The medial and lateral collateral ligaments, they're going to require you to either experience what's called a varus or a valgus force to the knee. That's basically a blow to the side of your knee, the inner side or the outer side, and like a rubber band, if you take a blow to the inside of your knee, it's going to create what's called a varus force, and then the outer ligament is susceptible to a tear. A blow to the outside of the knee is going to create a valgus force, and that's going to create a problem with the medial collateral on the inside of your knee. Based on that, the medial collateral ligament is much more susceptible to injury as we typically take our blows from the outside and creating a tear to the medial ligament. The LCL is often spared from trauma and often stays intact. On the inside of your knee, you have your PCL and your ACL. The posterior or PCL is in a nicer place inside your knee. So it's going to require more of a blunt force to the front, like in a football game or something, to create that tear. And lastly is the ACL. I saved the ACL for last because that is the most susceptible ligament that gets injured. You may know one or two people that have had ACL injuries and ACL tears before. The reason why it's such a common one is its location inside the knee, and therefore it's so susceptible to both blows to the outer and inner, blows to the front, but it's also very susceptible to other traumatic events like landing long on your feet or simply twisting your knee when you're playing sports, or if you're running really fast and you have to decelerate on a dime, that might actually literally tear the ACL. So it's in a weird place. It's in a tricky spot inside your knee. It's much more susceptible to tears, and we deal with that the most in the clinic. LCLs being the least common and ACLs being the most common.
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