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Understanding the ETF bid/ask spread
 
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11/9/2017 Webcast: ETFs--What you need to know Price is an important factor when making any investment decision. With ETFs (exchange-traded funds), there’s a bid-ask spread to help you find that best offer. Vanguard investing experts, Josh Hirt and Rich Powers, explain the dynamic pricing of ETFs and what you should consider. Important Information All investing is subject to risk, including the possible loss of the money you invest. This webcast is for your educational purposes only. We recommend that you consult a tax or financial advisor about your individual situation. Diversification does not ensure a profit or protect against a loss. Investments in stocks or bonds issued by non-U.S. companies are subject to risks including country/regional risk and currency risk. Vanguard ETF Shares are not redeemable with the issuing Fund other than in very large aggregations worth millions of dollars. Instead, investors must buy and sell Vanguard ETF Shares in the secondary market and hold those shares in a brokerage account. In doing so, the investor may incur brokerage commissions and may pay more than net asset value when buying and receive less than net asset value when selling. For more information about Vanguard funds or Vanguard ETFs, visit https://vgi.vg/2kgjLHu to obtain a prospectus or, if available, a summary prospectus. Investment objectives, risks, charges, expenses, and other important information are contained in the prospectus; read and consider it carefully before investing. © 2017 The Vanguard Group, Inc. All rights reserved. Vanguard Marketing Corporation, Distributor.
Views: 3513 Vanguard
Understanding ETFs: The bid-ask spread
 
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It's a matter of supply and demand: the difference between the highest price a buyer is willing to pay and the lowest price a seller is willing to take. Here's why the bid-ask spread matters for ETF investors.
Views: 383 Vanguard Canada
ETF Bid/Ask Spreads: What's too High?
 
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Subscribe to the ETF Profit Strategy Newsletter @ http://etfguide.com/nl_options_pc.php Bid/ask spreads are an ever present cost to all ETF investors and traders, even if you're buying ETFs without a trading commission. Ron DeLegge, Editor of ETFguide.com talks with Chris Hempstead, Director of ETF Execution at WallachBeth Capital about what to look for.
Views: 1252 ETFguide
How to invest in ETFs
 
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11/9/2017 Webcast: ETFs What you need to know How can you purchase Vanguard ETFs® (exchange-traded funds), and is there a particular time of day when it’s best to buy or sell an ETF? Vanguard investing experts, Josh Hirt and Rich Powers, describe how and when to add ETFs to your portfolio. Important Information All investing is subject to risk, including the possible loss of the money you invest. This webcast is for your educational purposes only. We recommend that you consult a tax or financial advisor about your individual situation. Diversification does not ensure a profit or protect against a loss. Investments in stocks or bonds issued by non-U.S. companies are subject to risks including country/regional risk and currency risk. Vanguard ETF Shares are not redeemable with the issuing Fund other than in very large aggregations worth millions of dollars. Instead, investors must buy and sell Vanguard ETF Shares in the secondary market and hold those shares in a brokerage account. In doing so, the investor may incur brokerage commissions and may pay more than net asset value when buying and receive less than net asset value when selling. For more information about Vanguard funds or Vanguard ETFs, visit https://vgi.vg/2zIetY9 to obtain a prospectus or, if available, a summary prospectus. Investment objectives, risks, charges, expenses, and other important information are contained in the prospectus; read and consider it carefully before investing. © 2017 The Vanguard Group, Inc. All rights reserved. Vanguard Marketing Corporation, Distributor.
Views: 15931 Vanguard
Expect high-quality, low-cost ETFs at Vanguard
 
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We're dedicated to helping make money for you, not taking money from you. That's why we offer you a selection of more than 75 ETFs (exchange-traded funds) that strive to deliver a combination of competitive long-term performance and low costs—without compromise. Visit https://vgi.vg/2vRpKry to learn more about the ETFs we offer—all of which are commission-free when bought through a Vanguard Brokerage Account. Or go straight to our complete list of ETFs at https://vgi.vg/2HAGyJ2. For the 10-year period ended December 31, 2017, 30 of 32 Vanguard stock ETFs and 5 of 5 Vanguard bond ETFs—for a total of 35 of 37 Vanguard ETFs—outperformed their Lipper peer-group averages. Results will vary for other time periods. Only ETFs with a minimum 10-year history were included in the comparison. Source: Lipper, a Thomson Reuters Company. **The competitive performance data shown represent past performance, which is not a guarantee of future results.** Visit https://vgi.vg/2HAGyJ2 to see the most recent performance of our ETFs. **You must buy and sell Vanguard ETF Shares through Vanguard Brokerage Services (we offer them commission-free) or through another broker (which may charge commissions). See the Vanguard Brokerage Services commission and fee schedules at https://vgi.vg/2HxavWg for limits. Vanguard ETF Shares are not redeemable directly with the issuing fund other than in very large aggregations worth millions of dollars. ETFs are subject to market volatility. When buying or selling an ETF, you will pay or receive the current market price, which may be more or less than net asset value.** **For more information about Vanguard ETFs, visit https://vgi.vg/2vRpMzG to obtain a prospectus or, if available, a summary prospectus. Investment objectives, risks, charges, expenses, and other important information are contained in the prospectus; read and consider it carefully before investing.** The "MONEY 50" lists published in the January/February 2018 Investor's Guide of Money magazine focus on mutual funds and ETFs that have low costs and produce long-term returns that match or beat their benchmarks. Past performance cannot be used to predict future returns. Fund share prices will fluctuate, so investors could lose money if they sell when prices have fallen. All investing is subject to risk, including the possible loss of the money you invest. © 2018 The Vanguard Group, Inc. All rights reserved. Vanguard Marketing Corporation, Distributor of the Vanguard Funds.
Views: 6805 Vanguard
What is an ETF and how is it different from a mutual fund?
 
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11/9/2017 Webcast: ETFs--What you need to know Should you invest in ETFs or mutual funds, or both? To help you understand these two investment vehicles, Vanguard investing experts Rich Powers and Josh Hirt discuss their similarities and differences. Important Information All investing is subject to risk, including the possible loss of the money you invest. This webcast is for your educational purposes only. We recommend that you consult a tax or financial advisor about your individual situation. Diversification does not ensure a profit or protect against a loss. Investments in stocks or bonds issued by non-U.S. companies are subject to risks including country/regional risk and currency risk. Vanguard ETF Shares are not redeemable with the issuing Fund other than in very large aggregations worth millions of dollars. Instead, investors must buy and sell Vanguard ETF Shares in the secondary market and hold those shares in a brokerage account. In doing so, the investor may incur brokerage commissions and may pay more than net asset value when buying and receive less than net asset value when selling. For more information about Vanguard funds or Vanguard ETFs, visit https://vgi.vg/2kePtVu to obtain a prospectus or, if available, a summary prospectus. Investment objectives, risks, charges, expenses, and other important information are contained in the prospectus; read and consider it carefully before investing. © 2017 The Vanguard Group, Inc. All rights reserved. Vanguard Marketing Corporation, Distributor.
Views: 11079 Vanguard
ETF Explained: How an Exchange Traded Fund Works
 
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What are ETFs, how do they differ from index funds, how new shares are created, how ETF prices are kept in line with the underlying securities and how to protect yourself when trading ETFs. Money For the Rest of Us is a personal finance channel on money, investing and the economy with new videos released every Monday and Wednesday. Please subscribe to my channel here: https://www.youtube.com/user/jdavidstein1?sub_confirmation=1
This Year's Top Trends—Can Investors Use ETFs to Make the Most of Them?
 
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More rising interest rates? Still strong equities? What trends will dominate 2018, and what ETFs could give investors an advantage? Gregg Greenberg and Simeon Hyman sat down during the Inside ETFs conference to discuss these questions and more. *** Hedging strategies have unique risks, costs and consequences such as fund management fees, rebalancing costs and taxable events, etc. It’s important that you fully understand the strategy you plan to use and read the prospectuses for any investments you intend to use as a hedge. Short or Ultra ProShares ETFs seek returns that are 3x, 2x, -1x, -2x or -3x the return of an index or other benchmark (target) for a single day, as measured from one NAV calculation to the next. Due to the compounding of daily returns, ProShares' returns over periods other than one day will likely differ in amount and possibly direction from the target return for the same period. These effects may be more pronounced in funds with larger or inverse multiples and in funds with volatile benchmarks. Investors should monitor their holdings consistent with their strategies, as frequently as daily. For more on correlation, leverage and other risks, please read the prospectus. There is no guarantee any ProShares ETF will achieve its investment objective. The performance quoted represents past performance and does not guarantee future results. Investment return and principal value of an investment will fluctuate so that an investor's shares, when sold or redeemed, may be worth more or less than the original cost. Shares are bought and sold at market price (not NAV) and are not individually redeemed from the fund. Market price returns are based upon the midpoint of the bid/ask spread at 4:00 p.m. ET (when NAV is normally determined for most funds) and do not represent the returns you would receive if you traded shares at other times. Brokerage commissions will reduce returns. Current performance may be lower or higher than the performance quoted. For standardized returns and performance data current to the most recent month-end go to www.proshares.com/funds. Short ProShares should lose money when their benchmarks or indexes rise. Short positions in a security lose value as that security's price increases. Bonds will decrease in value as interest rates rise. High yield bonds may involve greater levels of credit, liquidity and valuation risk than for higher-rated instruments. High yield bonds are more volatile than investment grade securities, and they involve a greater risk of loss (including loss of principal) from missed payments, defaults or downgrades because of their speculative nature. Some of these funds may concentrate investments in certain sectors. IGHG and HYHG do not attempt to mitigate factors other than rising Treasury interest rates that impact the price and yield of corporate bonds, such as changes to the market's perceived underlying credit risk of the corporate entity. IGHG and HYHG seek to hedge investment grade bonds and high yield bonds, respectively, against the negative impact of rising rates by taking short positions in Treasury futures. The short positions are not intended to mitigate credit risk or other factors influencing the price of the bonds, which may have a greater impact than rising or falling interest rates. These positions lose value as Treasury prices increase. Investors may be better off in a long-only investment grade or high yield investment than investing in IGHG or HYHG when interest rates remain unchanged or fall, as hedging may limit potential gains or increase losses. No hedge is perfect. Because the duration hedge is reset on a monthly basis, interest rate risk can develop intra-month, and there is no guarantee the short positions will completely eliminate interest rate risk. Furthermore, while IGHG and HYHG seek to achieve an effective duration of zero, the hedges cannot fully account for changes in the shape of the Treasury interest rate (yield) curve. IGHG and HYHG may be more volatile than a long-only investment in investment grade or high yield bonds. Performance of IGHG and HYHG could be particularly poor if investment grade or high yield credit deteriorates at the same time that Treasury interest rates fall. There is no guarantee the fund will have positive returns.
Views: 554 ProShares
Want Commission Free ETFs? [Part 1 of 2]
 
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[InvestorsHELP.net] Do you want access to over 100 commission free ETFs? Yes, it’s possible! Learn how to access these ETFs while learning useful information available on Ameritrade to help you make your purchasing choices! If you want to learn with Cindy as she continues on her profitable path to success in the markets, visit Cindy here: http://investorshelp.net/novice_trader_cindy.html
Views: 2136 Joe Gruender Jr.
Fixed Spread Forex Trading Broker | What is a Spread? | easyMarkets
 
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Fixed Spread Forex Trading Broker | What is a Spread? | easyMarkets Forex brokers generally offer two types of trade spreads, variable or fixed. ... On the other hand, fixed spreads are predetermined and remain constant throughout all trading conditions. A fixed spread will usually fall within the range of a variable spread, and is commonly set at either 2 or 3 pips for EUR/USD Welcome Friends to 's Biggest Technical Analysis Youtube Channel Our Dream is to make you an Expert in Trading any Market, be it Indian Stocks, Commodity or Forex Trading. We plan to achieve that by: * By providing you A-Z of Technical Analysis and Fundamental Analysis training, * By Giving you tools, Strategies and Indicators to know the markets better, * By Providing you a Demo trading platform free of cost to test the waters * By Providing you a Mobile App, to Monitor, Study, Analyze and trade on the Go. * By Providing you Free Honest Product reviews related to Trading. Our Channel has Videos basic videos from what is Technical Analysis to advanced concepts like Trading Divergences, we have training videos in Trading Psychology, Money Management along with hardcore Technical Analysis videos. Wishing you all the very best. ..................................................... forex trading strategies best forex trading platform forex trading for beginners forex trading tutorial what is forex trading and how does it work forex trading reviews forex market live forex trading wiki orex trading in india best forex trading platform forex trading for beginners forex trading tutorial forex trading reviews functions of foreign exchange market what is forex trading and how does it work
Views: 280 Forex Pasha
Opportunities and risks in an ETF investment
 
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Follow Super Tracker's recipe to maximize your opportunities and know your risks while investing in ETF (Exchange Traded Fund)
The Story of ETF Creation and Redemption iShares by BlackRock
 
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Ever wonder what allows ETFs to be liquid? The answer is creation and redemption, the process that lets ETFs trade even when volume is low. Using simple . Ever wonder what allows ETFs to be liquid? The answer is creation and redemption, the process that lets ETFs trade even when volume is low. Using simple . Ever wonder what allows ETFs to be liquid? The answer is creation and redemption, the process that lets ETFs trade even when volume is low. Using simple .
Views: 9445 Ayocisora Amado
Broad Indexes - Basics
 
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Lucci explains the strategic use of the SPY (S&P 500 ETF) as an indicator/analysis tool for stock and options trading.
Views: 504 Sang Lucci
Mutual Funds vs ETFs - Which Stock Market Tool is Better for Passive Investors?
 
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#Mutual #funds are a wildly popular option in the U.S. - especially in workplace retirement plans such as 401(k)s - with total assets under management of ~$19 trillion. These funds are typically bought and sold through investment companies instead of on public stock exchanges and therefore, unlike publicly traded ETFs, they do not always have trading commissions (though some do!). However, they almost always do charge an annual management fee, commonly referred to as an expense ratio, as well as other transaction-related and account maintenance fees. Mutual funds usually come in two classes: passive and actively managed. Passive mutual funds are often linked to an index (such as the Dow Jones Industrial Average, Nasdaq, or S&P 500) which in turn means that they are much more efficient due to lower trading and taxation costs. As such, they often have very low expense ratios and minimal to no transaction fees. These funds are often a great choice for passive investors if they invest a fairly consistent amount on a frequent schedule such as monthly or quarterly. This technique, known as dollar cost averaging, minimizes timing risk by eliminating the possibility of investing all of one’s money right before a market crash occurs. Since these funds have little-to-no transaction fees and very low expense ratios, they are ideal solutions for regular savers and investors since these low costs match up well with the fact that the stock market indices are known to appreciate at a pretty steady clip over the long term. However, while index mutual funds certainly have their pros, they do have some negative trade-offs. First, you are guaranteed to always slightly underperform the market by receiving a market-level return before fees are subtracted. Second, you have no control over holdings. You own shares in companies regardless if you approve of the products or services they provide or if you think they are worth investing in or not. Finally, you have no downside protection. If the stock market sells off, your investment will do so right along with it. There are no hedges offered within the fund against sharp declines. While you can always invest some of your savings in another fund, such as a bond fund, to hedge your overall portfolio against declines, this requires additional account maintenance and can also increase your fees thereby offsetting some of the main arguments in favor of holding index mutual funds. The other type of mutual fund is the actively managed mutual fund. These vehicles involve a portfolio manager selecting individual stocks and bonds of varying weights according to the fund’s strategy and the manager’s conviction whose opinions are typically supported by a team of research analysts. The pros of this structure include the potential to outperform the market, being able to invest your funds in a manner that more closely aligns with your preferences (whether strategic or moral), as well as potentially more protection against downside risk. Of course, however, these pros come with some cons. These include higher fees due to the significantly higher transaction, management, and research costs, the potential to underperform their index (especially net of fees), less tax efficiency (due to greater portfolio turnover). The other fund structure is the ETF. While they have been around for a little over two decades, over the past decade #ETFs have become extremely popular with total AUM growing rapidly to over $3.5 trillion. Unlike mutual funds which only trade at the end of each day when their price is updated, ETFs trade live on the major exchanges just like regular stocks. Similar to index mutual funds, ETFs tend to have very low expense ratios and tend to be more tax efficient. However, they do involve trading commissions, although some brokerages offer commission-free trading. In addition to their low fees, ETFs are favorable to mutual funds for investors who like to trade during the day and place stop orders, limit orders, and/or place short positions as these are possible with ETFs but not with mutual funds. Additionally, ETFs are often available in very niche sectors whereas mutual funds tend to be more general or strategy-specific. The primary cons of investing in ETFs include bid/ask spreads (i.e., you get less than the ETF’s NAV when selling and/or you pay more than NAV when you purchase) that vary with the liquidity of the individual fund wheras mutual funds always charge and pay NAV minus transaction fees. Additionally, while intraday liquidity is a pro in some cases, it can also be a con if investors lack discipline and trade in and out constantly, racking up transaction fees and short term capital gains taxes.
Views: 956 Sure Dividend
Why invest in an ETF?
 
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11/9/2017 Webcast: ETFs--What you need to know Vanguard investing experts, Rich Powers and Josh Hirt, review several features of ETFs (exchange-traded funds)—professional management, diversification, trading flexibility, access, and pricing—to help you determine how they can work with your portfolio. Important Information All investing is subject to risk, including the possible loss of the money you invest. This webcast is for your educational purposes only. We recommend that you consult a tax or financial advisor about your individual situation. Diversification does not ensure a profit or protect against a loss. Investments in stocks or bonds issued by non-U.S. companies are subject to risks including country/regional risk and currency risk. Vanguard ETF Shares are not redeemable with the issuing Fund other than in very large aggregations worth millions of dollars. Instead, investors must buy and sell Vanguard ETF Shares in the secondary market and hold those shares in a brokerage account. In doing so, the investor may incur brokerage commissions and may pay more than net asset value when buying and receive less than net asset value when selling. For more information about Vanguard funds or Vanguard ETFs, visit https://vgi.vg/2j739hZ to obtain a prospectus or, if available, a summary prospectus. Investment objectives, risks, charges, expenses, and other important information are contained in the prospectus; read and consider it carefully before investing. © 2017 The Vanguard Group, Inc. All rights reserved. Vanguard Marketing Corporation, Distributor.
Views: 5737 Vanguard
When to Buy Etfs OVER Stocks (6 Times When Investing In Etfs Is Better Than Picking Stocks)
 
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When To Purchase Etfs vs Stocks. When to Buy ETFS vs Stocks (6 Times When Investing In Etfs Is Better Than Picking Stocks) By the end of this video you will have much better idea of when invest in etfs (Exchange traded funds) versus selecting individual stocks. Let’s begin 1. When the sector has a narrow dispersion of returns. Sectors that have a narrow dispersion of returns from the mean do not offer stock pickers an advantage when trying to generate market-beating returns. For example lets assume there are 100 companies in the utility sector and most of them provide an annual rate of return of 4%, because the performance of all companies in these sectors tends to be similar. This is usually true for consumer staple investments as well. Its kind of like trying to choose which McDonalds to go to. No matter which one you choose the hamburger is basically going to taste the same. Since the dispersion of returns from these kind of investments tends to be narrow or similar; picking individual stock does not offer sufficiently higher return for the risk so purchasing a utility etf or index fund might make the most sense in this example. . 2. When you want to invest in a particular market sector or industry, but you have limited knowledge of that sector or industry For example, if you believe that now is a good time to invest in the mining sector, you may want to gain specific industry exposure. However, you are concerned that some stocks might encounter political problems harming their production. In this case, it is prudent to buy into the sector rather than a specific stock, since it reduces your risk. You can still benefit from growth in the overall sector, especially if it outperforms the overall market. 3. When the performance drivers of a company are difficult to understand. These companies may possess complicated technology or processes that cause them to underperform or do well. Perhaps performance depends on the successful development and sale of a new unproven technology. You find it difficult to understand the company or industry. Chipper told me a pharmaceutical company was going to do well, but I don’t understand how they operate, and there are so many of them to choose from. Which one do I pick? Unlike in the first example where the dispersion of investment returns were narrow, the desperation of returns in this case are wide so may even more challenging to pick the winning stocks in the industry. The biotechnology industry is a good example, as many of these companies depend on the successful development and sale of a new drug. If the development of the new drug does not meet expectations in the series of trials, or the FDA does not approve the drug application, the company faces a bleak future. On the other hand, if the FDA approves the drug, investors in the company can be highly rewarded. 4. When you want instant diversification ETFs provide instant diversification relative to individual stocks. It would be challenging to have a properly diversified portfolio with 10 individual stocks, but relatively simple with the same number of ETFs. (To learn more, see 10 Ways ETFs Can Grow Your Portfolio.) 5. Invest In Hard-to-access Markets Owning gold is a pain for most individual investors; owning SPDR Gold Shares (NYSE:GLD) (which owns gold bullion) is simple. Not only does this ETF bypass the bid-ask spreads of retail gold and the expense of rolling over futures contracts, but it has no storage or security requirements. Likewise, investors can access commodities like copper, precious metals, timberland and so on through the convenient forms of ETFs. (For more, check out Commodities: The Portfolio Hedge.) 6. Less time consuming way to invest The iShares US Medical Devices ETF (NYSE:IHI) contains 40 different stocks. It would take weeks for an individual investor to do proper due diligence on each of those names, and that is one of the advantages of ETF investing. Why should I spend all my time trying to sit here and pick individual stocks? I need to get my sorceress in Diablo 2 to level 99! Because the impact and importance of any one stock is relatively small, investors can spend their time thinking about which sectors and markets are poised to perform and make investment choices without being bogged down by an overwhelming amount of initial and ongoing due diligence. Links to related articles: -https://www.forbes.com/sites/greatspeculations/2010/11/05/seven-reasons-etfs-are-better-than-stocks/#48b598a536bd - https://www.investopedia.com/ask/answers/122214/should-i-invest-etfs-or-index-funds.asp -https://www.investopedia.com/articles/stocks/09/buying-stock-or-etf.asp ♦ Investing in the stock market!: https://goo.gl/yVAoES ♦ Save money, budget, build wealth and improve your financial position at any age: https://goo.gl/E97nJj My Website: Moneyandlifetv.com Twitter: https://twitter.com/Mkchip123 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/moneyandlifetv/
Views: 2933 Money and Life TV
Are Your ETFs Causing Market Bubbles?
 
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One of the biggest myths about passive investing is that ETFs and indexing will cause stock market bubbles. The thinking is simplistic: since index funds have to buy all companies in the stock market, they have to blindly buy stocks whose prices have gone up, right? This makes stock market bubbles worse, right? Let’s take a look and walk through the logic together to burst this myth’s bubble. The Economist article: https://econ.st/2E3d2do ------------------------ Visit PWL Capital: https://www.pwlcapital.com/Montreal Follow PWL Capital on: - Twitter: https://twitter.com/PWLCapital - Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/PWLCapital - LinkedIN: https://www.linkedin.com/company/105673 Follow Peter Guay on - Twitter: https://twitter.com/PWLPete - LinkedIN: https://www.linkedin.com/in/peter-guay-cfa-7608663/
Views: 3420 Peter Guay
Advisor Vanguard ETFs Trade And U.S Stock Global Macro Matters
 
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hello dear This infographic highlights the success of Vanguard as a global ETF provider. Learn more about how and why investors have embraced its approach worldwide, including details on our suite of U.S. offerings, our lower all-in ownership costs, and our global reach just visit here https://advisors.vanguard.com http://bandcplatform.blogspot.com/
Views: 39 tahir sunny
ETFs and Taxes: What Investors Need to Know
 
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Most ETFs are very tax efficient, but not all. Here is what you need to know. SPDR SP 500: http://www.zacks.com/funds/etf/SPY/profile?cid=CS-YOUTUBE-FT-VID VANGUARD TOTAL BOND MARKET ETF: http://www.zacks.com/funds/etf/BND/profile?cid=CS-YOUTUBE-FT-VID SPDR GOLD SHARES: http://www.zacks.com/funds/etf/GLD/profile?cid=CS-YOUTUBE-FT-VID WISDOMTREE JAPAN HEDGED EQUITY FUND: http://www.zacks.com/funds/etf/DXJ/profile?cid=CS-YOUTUBE-FT-VID Follow us on StockTwits: http://stocktwits.com/ZacksResearch Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/ZacksResearch Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ZacksInvestmentResearch
Views: 3191 ZacksInvestmentNews
How to select an ETF
 
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Evaluating an ETF in many ways is just like evaluating any other investment. Learn more at http://vgi.vg/1pUWskc
Views: 969 Vanguard Canada
Investing in ETFs
 
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In this video, Peter Martin introduces Exchange Traded Funds (ETFs), explaining what they are, as well as pointing out some of the benefits of investing in this type of instruments. Explore the opportunities for unlimited commission-free investing in Stocks & ETFs now. - https://www.trading212.com/en/Free-Stock-Trading Download the free native mobile apps now: Trading 212 for iOS - https://itunes.apple.com/gb/app/trading-212/id566325832?mt=8 Trading 212 for Android - https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.avuscapital.trading212&hl=en-uk Subscribe | Select the Alarm Bell | Hit the Thumbs Up | Share | Comment At Trading 212 we provide an execution only service. This video should not be construed as investment advice. Investments can fall and rise. Capital at risk.
Views: 9517 Trading 212
High Dividend ETF  iShares Core High Dividend vs. Vanguard Dividend Appreciation (HDV, VIG)
 
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https://goo.gl/QPCkqk - Start earning with binary options like millions of traders do The opening stock market action of 2016, mostly a picture of unnerving volatility and disappointing returns, has many investors turning their attention away from share price appreciation and more toward income available through solid dividend yields. In uncertain economic conditions, investors are also drawn to dividend-paying stocks because they typically carry less risk, since most high-dividend companies are large, well-established firms. One of the easiest ways of getting exposure to a basket of high-dividend yield stocks is through buying shares of a dividend-focused ETF. Two popular choices in the category of dividend ETFs are the iShares Core High Dividend ETF and the Vanguard Dividend Appreciation ETF. iShares Core High Dividend ETF The iShares Core High Dividend ETF (NYSEARCA: HDV) was introduced by BlackRock Inc. (NYSE: BLK) in 2011. The fund has $5.2 billion in total assets, and an average daily trading volume of $37.5 million. An average bid-ask spread of just 0.02% shows this ETF as being extremely liquid. It tracks the Morningstar Dividend Yield Focus Index, a dividend-weighted index that is composed of 75 U.S.-listed stocks screened for both dividend sustainability and high earnings. Fund holdings are weighted by the amount of cash dividends paid rather than by dividend yield. The leading market sectors comprising the fund's holdings are energy at 21%, consumer defensive stocks at 19%, and health care sector stocks at 17%. The top three portfolio components are Exxon Mobil Corporation (NYSE: XOM), Verizon Communications Inc. (NYSE: VZ) and Chevron Corporation (NYSE: CVX). The annual portfolio turnover ratio is 63%. The expense ratio for HDV is 0.12%, well below the large-value category average of 0.32%. The 12-month dividend yield as of May 2016 is 3.6%. The fund's five-year average annualized return is 11.85%, outperforming the category average of 10.89%. As of mid-May 2016, the fund was up 8.42% year to date (YTD), which was much better than the category average 3.85% Vanguard Dividend Appreciation ETF Vanguard launched the Vanguard Dividend Appreciation ETF (NYSEARCA: VIG) in 2006. It is the most widely held dividend ETF, with total assets of $20.7 billion, an average daily trading volume of $79.5 billion, and an average bid-ask spread of 0.01%. VIG tracks the NASDAQ US Dividend Achievers Select Index, a market cap-weighted index composed of U.S.-based companies that have increased their dividend payouts for at least 10 consecutive years. The index contains approximately 180 stocks. Consumer defensive stocks account for 23% of the portfolio assets, followed by industrials at 22% and health care stocks at 15%. The fund's top three holdings are Johnson & Johnson (NYSE: JNJ), The Coca-Cola Company (NYSE: KO) and PepsiCo Inc. (NYSE: PEP). The portfolio turnover ratio is relatively low at 22%. The fund's expense ratio is 0.10%, substantially below the large blend category average 0.37%. The fund offers a dividend yield o
Views: 213 ETFs
🤓 Understanding ETFs and their holdings 101 | FinTips🤑
 
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If you're considering using ETF's for your retirement or long term investments then the next few days of videos are for you. Today we will cover the makeup of ETF's and the allocations inside. Tomorrow we will take it a step further and cover market cap weighed versus equal weighted funds. We're an investing service that also helps you keep your dough straight. We'll manage your retirement investments while teaching you all about your money. ---Ready to subscribe--- https://www.youtube.com/jazzwealth?sub_confirmation=1 For more information visit: www.JazzWealth.com --- Instagram @jazzWealth --- Facebook https://www.facebook.com/JazzWealth/ --- Twitter @jazzWealth Business Affairs 📧[email protected]
Views: 2043 Jazz Wealth Managers
ETF Securities US, Silver
 
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Argentum. Atomic number 47. The grey metal. Whichever name you prefer, silver is widely regarded as one of the world’s most versatile precious metals.* In 2015, worldwide silver mine production increased for a 13th consecutive year to a record high of 886.7 million ounces. Notable country-level increases included Peru, Argentina, Russia and India.* * Mining Global, 7.15.15 * The Silver Institute, May 2016 For further information, please visit: https://www.etfsecurities.com/institutional/us/en-us DISCLOSURE The ETFS Silver Trust is not an investment company registered under the Investment Company Act of 1940 or a commodity pool for purposes of the Commodity Exchange Act. Shares of the Silver Trust are not subject to the same regulatory requirements as mutual funds. These investments are not suitable for all investors. Trusts focusing on a single commodity generally experience greater volatility. There are special risks associated with short selling and margin investing. Please ask your financial advisor for more information about these risks. The value of the Shares relates directly to the value of the silver held by the Trust and fluctuations in the price of silver could materially adversely affect an investment in the Shares. Several factors may affect the price of silver including: (1) A change in economic conditions, such as a recession, can adversely affect the price of silver. Silver is used in a wide range of industrial applications, and an economic downturn could have a negative impact on its demand and, consequently, its price and the price of the Shares; (2) Investors’ expectations with respect to the rate of inflation; (3) Currency exchange rates; (4) Interest rates; (5) Investment and trading activities of hedge funds and commodity funds; and (6) Global or regional political, economic or financial events and situations. Should there be an increase in the level of hedge activity of silver producing companies, it could cause a decline in world silver price, adversely affecting the price of the Shares. Commodities and futures generally are volatile and are not suitable for all investors. Shares in the Trust are not FDIC insured and may lose value and have no bank guarantee. Investors buy and sell shares on a secondary market (i.e., not directly from trust). Only market makers or “authorized participants” may trade directly with the fund, typically in blocks of 50k to 100k shares. The Fund’s net asset value per share (NAV) is calculated by dividing the value of the Fund’s total assets less total liabilities by the number of shares outstanding. Market Price returns are based on the bid/ask spread at 4 p.m. ET and do not represent the returns an investor would receive if shares were traded at other times. Carefully consider the fund’s investment objectives, risk factors, and fees and expenses before investing. For further discussion of the risks associated with an investment in the funds please read the prospectus at www.etfsecurities.com/etfsdocs/USProspectus.aspx. Or visit the ETF Securities website: www.etfsecurities.com. Diversification does not ensure a profit nor protect against loss. ALPS Distributors, Inc. is the marketing agent for ETFS Silver Trust. ETF001053 10/31/2017 thm
Chuck Hughes: Low Risk ETF Spread Strategy
 
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In this video the Optioneering Team will explore a low risk ETF Spread Strategy. The Team initiated a low risk spread trade for the Internet ETF symbol FDN. The top holdings in the Internet ETF are listed below and include the FANG stocks. The maximum risk for this spread trade was 3.3% regardless of the price movement of the Internet ETF even if the ETF declined 50% in price. At the same time there is no limit on the profit potential for this spread trade if FDN continues to move up in price. Discover a way to trade the strongest stock market sector with very little risk and unlimited profit potential. FDN ETF Spread Trade Maximum risk 3.3% Unlimited profit potential Participate in the strongest stock market sector For more information, please contact us at 866-661-56654
Views: 2393 Chuck Hughes Online
free finance ETF portfolio tool - Ways2Wealth.com
 
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Looking for the best online asset management for a diversified passive investment portfolio for free? Make a diversified Markowitz portfolio. Try our free online asset management tool to develop a diversified portfolio according to modern portfolio theory. etf fundportfolio etfs investmentfunds investing etf stock funds etf portfolios investors stock bond fund indexfund portfolios bond etf fund stocks funds portfolios funds market market fund etfs markets We are scientists with a research focus on financial modeling, risk analysis and artificial intelligence. We have worked in the financial industry for many years and have developed our own proprietary models which we have also been used by banks, hedge funds and military special units. With this site we aim to help normal people make smarter financial decisions. Ways2Wealth Address: Zürich, Switzerland Phone: +41 43 50 80 657 Email: [email protected] Read more at www.ways2wealth.com
How to  buy commission FREE ETF W/ Etrade (3 min)
 
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Commission FREE ETF W/ Etrade (3 min) The Investor Show is an financial literacy and commentary show that features a number of investors, financial experts, professional athletes, business owners and more. The views of each video are not advice. Books: https://amzn.to/2IXCO0P Email: [email protected] Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/theinvestors... Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/theinvestor... Workshop: http://www.theinvestorshowtv.com/videos/ Podcast: http://www.theinvestorshowtv.com/podcast/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/royalfinancials Website: www.theinvestorshowtv.com
Views: 634 The Investor Show
ETF Bubble - Separating Fact From Fiction
 
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With US markets at all time highs, many investors wonder if the massive growth of ETFs are perpetuating a bubble. Our quantitive research tools suggest ETFs are not currently creating a bubble in in broad based market indexes like the S&P 500. However, we do believe ETFs can cause two types of bubbles: - Short-term bubbles in sub-sectors or niches like REITs - Long-term bubbles in corporate governance and ESG through proxy voting Our key take aways: - Know what your ETF owns, and how is it being influenced by other ETFs - Understand the proxy voting policies of the ETF sponsor
Views: 333 Toroso Investments
Small Cap ETF's - 03172010
 
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Start your trading day off on the right foot, with Small Cap Market Minute. This free daily video newsletter focuses on the major Small Cap ETFs including IJR iShares S&P SmallCap 600, VB Vanguard Small Cap VIPERs, IWC iShares Russell Microcap Index, UWM Ultra Russell 2000, SAA Ultra SmallCap 600 ProShares, TNA Small Cap Bull 3X,plus we follow the SPTSES TSX Smallcap Index and the SPCDNX TSX Venture Exchange. http://www.theuptrend.com/nasdaq-market-timing-service.html
Index Mutual Funds vs ETFs
 
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In many past videos (which I have linked below) I have discussed the uses of Index Mutual Funds and ETFs in your portfolio. But what is the difference between these two investments? I'll explain in today's episode of Your Money, Your Choices. Do you feel there is a noticeable difference in your Index Mutual Fund or ETFs? I’d love to hear about it in the comments below. https://youtu.be/y95SiFq5Z8w https://youtu.be/dmzwbkv4zko http://cawidgets.morningstar.ca/ArticleTemplate/ArticleGL.aspx?culture=en-CA&id=810757 https://institutional.vanguard.com/iam/pdf/GENERP.pdf ------------------- Visit PWL Capital: https://pwlcapital.com Follow PWL Capital on: - Twitter: https://twitter.com/PWLCapital - Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/PWLCapital - LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/pwl-capital Follow Susan Daley on - Twitter: https://twitter.com/_SusanDaley - LinkedIn: https://linkedin.com/in/daleysusan Channel management, content strategy & production by Truly Social Inc. http://trulysocial.ca
Views: 10542 Susan Daley
Should You Sell Your ETFs And Mutual Funds When The Stock Market Drops?
 
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It can be unnerving when the stock market - and your portfolio - fall. But should you sell or hold your diversified ETFs and mutual funds? Investor’s Business Daily has been helping people invest smarter results by providing exclusive stock lists, investing data, stock market research, education and the latest financial and business news to help investors make more money in the stock market. Learn more. Get more IBD: Like us on Facebook https://business.facebook.com/investorsbusinessdaily Follow us on Twitter https://twitter.com/IBDinvestors Follow us on Instagram https://www.instagram.com/investorsbusinessdaily/ Follow us on StockTwits https://stocktwits.com/InvestorsBusinessDaily
Investing on Mutual Funds - Bid Ask and Spread
 
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John Pollock Financial, Phone #972-396-0449, http://www.johnpollockfinancial.com/financial-advisor/mutual-funds/ Financial Adviser John Pollock Financial Adviser talks about Investing on Mutual Funds. He discusses that in order to reduce cost one must reduce Trade less which something he taught in his seminars on Financial Gravity.
Views: 92 Financial Gravity
Think You Know What Your ETF Costs? Take a Closer Look | Presented by State Street Global Advisors
 
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Investors tend to evaluate the cost of an ETF based on the expense ratio. But ETFs also come with other hidden costs that can eat into returns over time. Are you ready to become a cost hunter? To learn more, visit: https://paidpost.nytimes.com/state-street/etf-costs-can-be-tricky.html#100000006055531 ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Check out more content from T Brand Studio: Website: http://www.tbrandstudio.com/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/tbrandstudio Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TBrandStudio Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/tbrandstudio/ T Brand Studio is the brand marketing unit of The New York Times. We create content and experiences that spark imaginations and influence the most influential audiences around the world. The news and editorial staffs of The New York Times had no role in this post's preparation.
Views: 45992 T Brand Studio
Top ETFs Trading - How to Find the Best Exchange Traded Funds
 
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Top ETFs Trading: Which are the Best exchange traded funds to trade NOW? This video helps you find the answer. http://www.topdogtrading.net/youtubeorganic-trading The best ETF to trade will change over time. This lesson explains the specific technique to find the best exchange traded funds vs stocks at any given time. Enjoy the video! Leave your questions and comments below! Make sure not to miss a single video from Barry! Click here to Subscribe: https://www.youtube.com/user/TopDogTrading?sub_confirmation=1 ==================================================== Barry Burns Top Dog Trading TopDogTrading.com Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TopDogTrading/ Get the Free Trade Strategy: “The Rubber Band Trade”: http://www.topdogtrading.net/youtubeorganic-trading =================================================== Watch the related video: "Trading Gaps for Daily Profit:" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_5U1HvPsZyc --- Risk Disclosure: http://bit.ly/Risk-Disc --- RISK DISCLAIMER: The information contained on this video is for informational and educational purposes only. We are not registered as a securities broker-dealer or as investment advisers, either with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission or with any state securities regulatory authority. We are neither licensed nor qualified to provide investment advice. Trading and investing involves substantial risk. Financial loss, even above the amount invested, is possible. Seek the services of a competent professional person before investing or trading with money. The information contained on this video, is not provided to any particular individual with a view toward their individual circumstances and nothing in this video should be construed as investment or trading advice. Each individual should assume that all information contained on this site is not trustworthy unless verified by their own independent research. Any statements and/or examples of earnings or income, including hypothetical or simulated performance results, are solely for illustrative purposes and are not to be considered as average earnings. Prior successes and past performance with regards to earnings and income are not an indication of potential future success or performance. You should never trade with money you cannot afford to lose. The information in this video is in no way a solicitation of any order to buy or sell. The author and publisher assume no responsibility for your trading results. This information is provided "AS IS," without any implied or express warranty as to its performance or to the results that may be obtained by using the information. Factual statements in this site are made as of the date the information was created and are subject to change without notice. HYPOTHETICAL OR SIMULATED PERFORMANCE RESULTS HAVE CERTAIN INHERENT LIMITATIONS. UNLIKE AN ACTUAL PERFORMANCE RECORD, SIMULATED RESULTS DO NOT REPRESENT ACTUAL TRADING. ALSO, SINCE THE TRADES HAVE NOT ACTUALLY BEEN EXECUTED, THE RESULTS MAY HAVE UNDER- OR OVER-COMPENSATED FOR THE IMPACT, IF ANY, OF CERTAIN MARKET FACTORS, SUCH AS LACK OF LIQUIDITY. SIMULATED TRADING PROGRAMS IN GENERAL ARE ALSO SUBJECT TO THE FACT THAT THEY ARE DESIGNED WITH THE BENEFIT OF HINDSIGHT. NO REPRESENTATION IS BEING MADE THAT ANY ACCOUNT WILL OR IS LIKELY TO ACHIEVE PROFITS OR LOSSES SIMILAR TO THOSE SHOWN.
Views: 6231 TopDogTrading
ETF Securities US Precious Metals Basket
 
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Gold or silver? Platinum or palladium? How do investors make a decision as to which precious metal is the appropriate choice for portfolio diversification purposes? Rising rates could spell good news for precious metals. That’s because a stronger economy drives the need for manufacturing components, many of which rely on platinum, palladium, and silver. And, a stronger economy boosts jewelry sales, which accounts for half gold’s annual demand.* * International Gem Society For further information, please visit: https://www.etfsecurities.com/institutional/us/en-us Disclosure The ETFS Silver Trust, ETFS Gold Trust, ETFS Platinum Trust, ETFS Palladium Trust and Precious Metals Basket Trust are not investment companies registered under the Investment Company Act of 1940 or a commodity pool for purposes of the Commodity Exchange Act. Shares of the Trusts are not subject to the same regulatory requirements as mutual funds. These investments are not suitable for all investors. Trusts focusing on a single commodity generally experience greater volatility. The value of the Shares relates directly to the value of the precious metal held by the Trust and fluctuations in the price could materially adversely affect investment in the Shares. Several factors may affect the price of precious metals, including: (1) A change in economic conditions, such as a recession, can adversely affect the price of the precious metal held by the Trust. Some metals are used in a wide range of industrial applications, and an economic downturn could have a negative impact on its demand and, consequently, its price and the price of the Shares; (2) Investors’ expectations with respect to the rate of inflation; (3) Currency exchange rates; (4) Interest rates; (4) Investment and trading activities of hedge funds and commodity funds; and (5) Global or regional political, economic or financial events and situations. Should there be an increase in the level of hedge activity of the precious metal held by the trust or producing companies, it could cause a decline in world precious metal prices, adversely affecting the price of the Shares. Should there be an increase in the level of hedge activity of the precious metal held by the Trusts or producing companies, it could cause a decline in world precious metal prices, adversely affecting the price of the shares. Commodities and futures generally are volatile and are not suitable for all investors. Shares in the Trust are not FDIC insured and may lose value and have no bank guarantee. Investors buy and sell shares on a secondary market (i.e., not directly from trust). Only market makers or “authorized participants” may trade directly with the fund, typically in blocks of 50k to 100k shares. The Fund’s net asset value per share (NAV) is calculated by dividing the value of the Fund’s total assets less total liabilities by the number of shares outstanding. Market Price returns are based on the bid/ask spread at 4 p.m. ET and do not represent the returns an investor would receive if shares were traded at other times. Carefully consider the fund’s investment objectives, risk factors, and fees and expenses before investing. For further discussion of the risks associated with an investment in the funds please read the prospectus at www.etfsecurities.com/etfsdocs/USProspectus.aspx. Or visit the ETF Securities website: www.etfsecurities.com. Diversification does not ensure a profit nor protect against loss. ALPS Distributors, Inc. is the marketing agent for ETFS Silver Trust, ETFS Gold Trust, ETFS Platinum Trust, ETFS Palladium Trust and ETFS Precious Metals Basket Trust. ETF001053 10/31/17
Buying Vanguard Mutual Funds Vs. ETFs
 
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https://goo.gl/QPCkqk - Start earning with binary options like millions of traders do Vanguard has become a popular choice for investors thanks to its long list of low-cost mutual funds. Vanguard has added a full menu of exchange-traded funds (ETFs) to its lineup, making the company one of the leading providers for both investment products. Most Vanguard index mutual funds have a corresponding ETF. Both products are very similar in management style and returns, but there are differences that can make one product more appropriate than another. Vanguard's products also carry expense ratio differences between mutual fund/ETF pairs that must be examined to make the best choice. The Difference Between Mutual Funds and ETFs Tradability of shares is the most significant difference between mutual funds and ETFs. Mutual fund shares price only once at the end of the trading day. Investors can place trade orders throughout the day, but the transaction is only completed at the end of the trading day. ETFs carry more flexibility; they trade like stocks and can be bought and sold throughout the day. In many cases, ETFs carry lower expense ratios than their mutual fund counterparts, but they must be traded in a brokerage account. ETF trades could come with brokerage commission fees. Investors must decide between a buy-and-hold strategy or a trading strategy to determine which product may be more advantageous. The Difference Between Vanguard's Investor Class and Admiral Class Shares The mutual fund versus ETF debate for Vanguard products in part comes down to how much is being invested. Most Vanguard mutual funds come with $3,000 minimum initial investments, but some can be initiated with a $1,000 investment. Initial investments of $10,000 or more are eligible for the company's lower-cost Admiral share class. These are essentially the same products as the investor-class shares, but they come with cheaper expense ratios. The Admiral class shares tend to outperform their investor class share counterparts. Comparing Vanguard Investor Class Mutual Fund Shares to ETFs The popular Vanguard 500 Index Fund and the Vanguard S&P 500 ETF provide good examples of the cost and trading differences that come with mutual funds and ETFs, although most mutual funds and ETFs in the Vanguard lineup follow a similar pattern. The 500 Index Fund comes with an expense ratio of 0.17%, while the S&P 500 ETF has a much lower expense ratio of just 0.05%. On a $3,000 investment, investors are paying $5.10 a year in expenses in the mutual fund as opposed to $1.50 with the ETF. The overall cost difference is minor, but it could make a difference for an investor who wants to put the money in an account and leave it untouched until retirement. Conversely, an investor who wants a little more trading flexibility would opt for the ETF, although the trading commissions from a few trades could make it more costly overall. The choice often comes down to investor preference. Comparing Vanguard Admiral Class Mutual Fund Shares to ETFs When considering the
Views: 446 ETFs
The Top 7 ETFs For Day Trading
 
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https://goo.gl/QPCkqk - Start earning with binary options like millions of traders do Day traders attempt to make profits by opening and closing trade positions several times during a day. They usually close all of their open positions at the end of the day and don’t carry them over to the next day. In addition to stocks, the exchange traded funds (ETFs ) have emerged as another instrument of choice for day trading. They offer the diversification of a mutual fund, the high liquidity and real-time trading of a stock, and low transaction costs. A few ETFs may also qualify for tax benefits, depending upon the eligibility criteria and financial regulations. (For more, see: The Benefits Of ETF Investing and Should You Buy Stock Or An ETF?) This article explores the top ETFs, which are suitable for day trading. Criteria for Selection Day trading involves buying and selling positions quickly, with attempts to make small profits by trading large volume from the multiple trades. The ETFs suitable for day trading should have high levels of liquidity enabling easy execution of the trades at fair prices. The transaction costs associated with ETF trading should be low, as frequent trading leads to high transaction costs that eat into the available profit potential. Additionally, one should also consider the bid-ask spread on the price quotes. The bid-ask spread is the difference between the buy and sell price demanded by the market participants trading a particular security. A tighter bid-ask spread indicates fair price discovery and higher liquidity. Most ETFs that fit these three criteria are based on broader markets (like those based on popular indexes like the Standard & Poor's 500 Index or overall broader markets). Day traders may also get high liquidity in specialized theme based ETFs, like gold or oil-based ETFs. However, such ETFs may be costly regarding transaction costs making them unsuitable for day trading. (For more, see Day-Trading Gold ETFs: Top Tips and Top Oil ETFs (XLE, AMLP, VDE, USO)). Similarly, others like leveraged ETFs may offer high exposure (two times or three times the underlying), but they usually lack high liquidity and may come at high expense ratios. Such ETFs may not fit the day trading criteria, and are not considered for inclusion in the list of day trading. The Top ETFs for Day Trading 1. Vanguard S&P 500 ETF (VOO): VOO tracks the popular S&P 500 Index, which represents the top 500 companies in the U.S. from diverse sectors.This ETF invests in the stocks included in the S&P 500 Index in the similar proportion to the index. It has successfully mirrored the performance of the index with a minimal tracking error. With an average daily traded volume of more than 2.6 million shares, VOO has one of the lowest expense ratios of only 0.05%, making it the favorite for day traders. 2. iShares Core S&P 500 ETF (IVV) and SPDR S&P 500 ETF Trust (SPY): IVV and SPY work exactly the same way as the above-mentioned VOO ETF. The only difference is that IVV and SPY have slightly higher expense
Views: 147 ETFs
ETFs or Mutual Funds: How to Choose?
 
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Both exchange traded funds and mutual funds can suit your investing needs, so how do you know which to choose? Click here for more insights: http://insights.schwab.com/ 0915-89XW
Views: 15178 Charles Schwab
FRM: Order Types (market, limit, stop, stop-limit)
 
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Market order: guaranteed fill, but not price. Limit order: guaranteed "or better" price, but not fill. Stop: After price trigger reached, becomes market. Stop-limit: After price trigger, becomes limit order. For more financial risk management videos visit our website at http://www.bionicturtle.com!
Views: 256642 Bionic Turtle
How to Find ETFs that pay dividends with etrade(8 mins)
 
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ETFs are great for tracking indexes, commodities, industries etc. but you can collect dividends as well.
Views: 876 The Investor Show
How Exchange Traded Funds Work. Why are ETFs So Popular? Part3
 
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How Exchange Traded Funds Work. Why are ETFs So Popular? Part3 There are a number of reasons that an Exchange Traded Funds might be a better investment option than either individual stocks or a mutual fund. Their primary advantage over individual stocks, of course, is that they allow the investor to purchase a diverse array of assets at once. Mutual funds offer the same advantage, but ETFs are better than mutual funds in several ways. They're more flexible, since they can be traded on the stock market instead of being held until after markets close, the way mutual funds are. Savvy investors can buy and sell ETF shares quickly throughout the trading day in response to shifts in market value. Investors can also take advantage of different stock strategies with ETFs, such as selling them short, buying them on margin (borrowing money to buy stocks) and purchasing very small numbers of shares. Those things aren't possible with mutual funds.
Views: 51 Online Trading
Making Money Trading Stocks & ETFs April 13th
 
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April 13th: Today's Market Recap--Stalling? Up over 7% YTD. Don't miss out on the potential in 2018 Active Trend Traders have an edge in this market. Dennis & guests deliver great color commentary each week to those wanting to benefit from the swings in the Market!
Views: 25 Market Tech Talk
What effect will Fed policy have on equity markets?
 
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12/6/2017 Webcast: The economic and market outlook for 2018 On Fed monetary policy, Vanguard’s global chief economist explores interest rate policy and the impact of raising short-term rates in 2018 as the Fed continues on its path to normalization. Important information: All investing is subject to risk, including the possible loss of the money you invest. There is no guarantee that any particular asset allocation or mix of funds will meet your investment objectives or provide you with a given level of income. Diversification does not ensure a profit or protect against a loss. Past performance is no guarantee of future returns. Investments in bonds are subject to the risk that an issuer will fail to make payments on time and that bond prices will decline because of rising interest rates or negative perceptions of an issuer's ability to make payments. Investments in stocks or bonds issued by non-U.S. companies are subject to risks including country/regional risk and currency risk. These are especially high in emerging markets. This webcast is for educational purposes only. We recommend that you consult a tax or financial advisor about your individual situation.
Views: 3045 Vanguard
How To Reduce Taxes On ETF Gains
 
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https://goo.gl/QPCkqk - Start earning with binary options like millions of traders do Investors seeking to beat the market should look to exchange-traded funds (ETFs) for their tax efficiency. The ease of buying and selling ETFs, along with the low transaction costs, offer investors another efficient portfolio-enhancing tool. Tax efficiency is also an important part of their appeal, and is the one we'll focus on in this article. Investors need to understand the tax consequences of ETFs, so they can be proactive with their strategies. We'll begin by exploring the tax rules that apply to ETFs and the exceptions you should be aware of, and then we will show you some money-saving tax strategies that can help you get a great return and beat the market. Read on to learn why these rules can remove restrictions in your financial life. SEE: Introduction To Exchange-Traded FundsGeneral Tax RulesETFs enjoy a more favorable tax treatment than mutual funds due to the unique structure. Mutual funds create and redeem shares with in-kind transactions that are not considered sales. As a result, they do not create taxable events. However, when you sell an ETF, the trade triggers a taxable event. Whether it is a long-term or short-term capital gain or loss depends on how long the ETF was held. In the United States, to receive long-term capital gains treatment you must hold an ETF for more than one year. If you hold the security for one year or less, then it will receive short-term capital gains treatment. It's not all doom-and-gloom for mutual fund investors. The good news is that a mutual fund's generally higher turnover of shares creates more chances for capital gains to be passed through to the investors, compared with the lower-turnover ETFs. SEE: Mutual Fund Or ETF: Which Is Right For You?As with stocks, you are subject to the wash-sale rules if you sell an ETF for a loss and then buy it back within 30 days. A wash sale occurs when you sell or trade a security at a loss, and within 30 days after the sale you: Buy a substantially identical ETF, Acquire a substantially identical ETF in a fully taxable trade or Acquire a contract or option to buy a substantially identical ETF If your loss was disallowed because of the wash-sale rules, you should add the disallowed loss to the cost of the new ETF. This increases your basis in the new ETF. This adjustment postpones the loss deduction until the disposition of the new ETF. Your holding period for the new ETF begins on the same day as the holding period of the ETF that was sold. Many ETFs generate dividends from the stocks they hold. Ordinary (taxable) dividends are the most common type of distribution from a corporation. According to the IRS, you can assume that any dividend you receive on common or preferred stock is an ordinary dividend unless the paying corporation tells you otherwise. These dividends are taxed when paid by the ETF. Qualified dividends are subject to the same maximum tax rate that applies to net capital gains. Your ETF provider should tell you whether the dividends th
Views: 93 ETFs
Do Low-Cost Investments Give Investors Higher Returns?
 
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Many investors are too fixated on picking the right stocks at the right time. Instead, they should be fixated on their total return after all fees. Watch this video as Vincent Tey, Head of Advisory Team at Providend, shares why active management is a zero-sum game before cost, and the winners have to win at the expense of the losers. If you would like to have a higher certainty of obtaining better investment returns, please feel free to contact us at https://www.providend.com/service-enquiry/ or at 6309 2488 for an exploratory session today. _______________________________________________________ 1. What Are The Costs Involved In Investing In A Fund? There are two kinds of fees - Transaction Fees and Annual Expense Fees. Transaction fee is the one-time fee that investors incur when invest into a fund. They are called sales charge, upfront fee and in some cases, it is the difference between the buying and selling price of the fund and we call them bid and offer spread. There is no debate about it, the lower the cost, the better the returns. Investors also should be careful of excessive switching fee if the account applies switching fee. One other form of transaction fee that investors should be careful of is redemption penalty in some investment structure. Be careful not to get into such structures. For annual expense fee, it is the management fee, trading cost and also marketing expense of running a fund, also known as Total Expense Ratio (TER). Now as investors when we invest into a fund, our expectation is that with the fund managers’ education, skills and superior resources and time in monitoring the investment, they should consistently deliver better returns. In reality, however, research and historical data have shown that actively managed funds that charges high fees have consistently underperformed low cost index funds. 2. What Are The Different Investment Approaches? Essentially, we can approach investment in two ways - passive investment or active investment. Passive investment refers to the buy and hold approach where we buy into a passively managed fund or known as index fund. Passive investors believe that the market is efficient. They have the confidence that the price reflects the collective knowledge of all the investors and it is hard to consistently find mispriced securities. Passively managed funds usually have low annual expense of about 0.5% per annum or lower. Active investment seeks to outperform the index through stock picking, market timing or sector rotation. They are called active funds. The fund managers can find any stock that is listed on the Singapore Stock Exchange and not limited to the STI component stocks. They believe that they can find mispricing securities, buy low and sell high. They also believe that they know which sector will do better or the market will go up or down in the future and profit from there. The annual expense of active funds is at about 2% or higher. 3. So, How Is The Performance Like For Each Investment Approach? According to the data compiled by S&P Dow Jones Indices, the number of active managed U.S. equity funds that beat the S&P 500 index over a period of ten years is less than 15%. Overwhelmingly, majority of the funds failed to beat the index or the benchmark. Even in less efficient markets such as the Emerging Market, the number of actively managed Emerging Market funds in the U.S. that beat the S&P/IFCI index over a period of ten years is only around 18%. Survivorship of the active funds is an even more worrying fact for investors beside underperformance. Over ten years, only 54.35% of the active funds that are benchmarked against the S&P 500 Index survived with the rest closing or merging with another fund. So, choosing an active fund that outperform the index is one challenge. Choosing one that will still be in business over ten years is another. 4. Why Do Most Active Funds Underperform? One clear reason is fee. Before cost, active investment is a zero-sum game. Active investors that earn above market returns at the expense of other active investors. For example, let's assume that there are only two fund managers in the markets - A and B. And let’s assume that the markets give a return of 10%. So, if Fund Manager A earns a return of 15%, that would mean Fund Manager B will only earn 5%. After cost, however, active investment is a negative-sum game. Let’s assume that the running cost of both the funds is 2%. That would mean that Fund A will earn a net return of 13% and that of Fund B is only 3%. The average of these two funds is 8% which is 2% below the market return because of cost. ________________________________________________________ Follow Providend on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Providend/ Follow Providend on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/providend/
Views: 145 Providend
Which Markets To Trade?  Trading Indices! 👍
 
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Which Markets To Trade? Trading Indices http://www.financial-spread-betting.com/indices/Index-spread-betting.html PLEASE LIKE AND SHARE THIS VIDEO SO WE CAN DO MORE! An Index can be defined either by what it is or what it does. It is a “basket of stocks”, but that’s about as enlightening as a set of flat-pack furniture instructions…written in Korean. What it does is let people see how well a stock market is performing. -Indices are a ‘basket of stocks’. They rise or fall depending on what happens to their constituent stocks. -Most indices use a ‘market cap weighted average’ calculation, so they are more heavily affected by large stocks than by small ones. -However a few, including the Dow Jones 30, don’t use this method. It pays to know what stocks and/or sectors are heavily represented in your index. Trading Indices Now we look at the second market you may consider trading, particularly when you are just starting out. This is the market of indices, the combination values of various countries’ markets or sectors. For instance, in America you have the Dow Jones Industrial Average (DJIA) or simply the “Dow”. This is made up of the values of the stocks of just 30 companies, and yet reflects the general state of US industry. It’s been going more than a century, and the only company that has remained on it all that time is General Electric. Other companies have been swapped out from time to time so that the index remains a good indication of the market. The companies are selected by the editorial board of the Wall Street Journal, which meets at intervals for just this purpose. The great advantage of trading the Dow is that it is cheap to trade, with a small spread – the difference between the buying and selling price or bid and offer. It’s a great place to start your trading. Also in America we have the S&P 500, which in contrast to the Dow uses the prices of the stocks of 500 companies to make up its value. When indices are made up, they usually don’t just add together the stock prices of the named companies to come to a total. They apply a weighting factor, which may for example mean that the stock price of a larger company has a larger effect on the index. The primary purpose of indices in the first place was to reflect the general investing environment, to report on how the markets are doing, so when they were set up the founders had that purpose in mind. In the UK we look to the FTSE 100 for an indication of the strength of the economy. This combines the stock prices of 100 UK companies. With some indices, such as this and the Dow, there are actually a whole range of varied “sub” indices available, covering different market sectors, different company capitalization, etc., but it is generally understood which index is meant when you use the term FTSE (footsie) or Dow. Another popular index is the DAX, which is the German market index. This tends to be more volatile than the others and thus can be hard to trade. But this also makes it more rewarding if you are up to the challenge. The French CAC is a similar sort of index, less popular than the DAX, and with slightly less volatility. Before you decide which index to use, it’s worthwhile doing a little research online. For instance, you will probably want to know whether the index is biased towards the tech industries or whether it has a predominance of banking and financial components. If you know what sectors the index tends to be weighted towards, you are better able to understand how it moves. This research is not something you have to do frequently, but it simply sets the stage for you to understand how the index value may vary over time.
Views: 7710 UKspreadbetting
Before You Trade a Stock, ETF or Mutual Fund, Know This!
 
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You're going to make some investment trades, eh? Make sure you understand how the process works. Market orders, limit orders, Bid/Ask Price, and how mutual funds trade. Also watch this video by my man Dustin Tibbits over at Jazz Wealth. A very informative video indeed. Well worth 5 minutes of time. https://youtu.be/bwEMc9VKKsE
How to respond to a market correction
 
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Learn how to plan ahead to protect against a market correction. Important information All investing is subject to risk, including the possible loss of the money you invest. Diversification does not ensure a profit or protect against a loss. There is no guarantee that any particular asset allocation or mix of funds will meet your investment objectives or provide you with a given level of income. Advice services are provided by Vanguard Advisers, Inc., a registered investment advisor, or by Vanguard National Trust Company, a federally chartered, limited-purpose trust company. This webcast is for educational purposes only. We recommend that you consult a tax or financial advisor about your individual situation. © 2017 The Vanguard Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
Views: 2913 Vanguard
Tax-efficient withdrawals in retirement
 
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10/18/2017 Webcast: Retirement planning In retirement, many investors turn to their investment portfolios to help meet their spending needs. If you hold both taxable and tax-deferred accounts, here are some guidelines to help you determine the most tax-efficient way to spend from your portfolio. Important information For more information about Vanguard funds, visit vanguard.com to obtain a prospectus or, if available, a summary prospectus. Investment objectives, risks, charges, expenses, and other important information about a fund are contained in the prospectus; read and consider it carefully before investing. All investing is subject to risk, including the possible loss of the money you invest. Be aware that fluctuations in the financial markets and other factors may cause declines in the value of your account. There is no guarantee that any particular asset allocation or mix of funds will meet your investment objectives or provide you with a given level of income. Diversification does not ensure a profit or protect against a loss. This webcast is for educational purposes only. We recommend that you consult a tax or financial advisor about your individual situation. Advice services are provided by Vanguard Advisers, Inc., a registered investment advisor. © 2017 The Vanguard Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
Views: 5464 Vanguard
HDV - iShares Core High Dividend ETF HDV buy or sell Buffett read basic
 
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Buffett said: He saw all the stock earnings I think the final value of the investment does not need to see numbers only need to figure out what the business is doing with the most basic information to determine The following is my finishing out of the super basic Hoping to help you get the most out of all stocks with the fastest time maybe we can leave message to discuss like... 1. ask your question 2. Master! Buy and sell? 3. Share your experience for this stock
Views: 58 Buffett Info